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Full text of "Sponsor"

' GENERAL LIBRARY 
10 ROCKEFELLFR PLAZA. I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor57sponno2 






PO 



4 MA 19 9 ^ 

40« a copy • f 10 ■ ymr 



^^ |f^ 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




WHY AUTOS PUT 
$100 MILLION 
INTO AIR MEDIA 



\<-w cai design Im- 
changed auto advertis- 
ing. Detroft, - * - 1 1 i r » «_r 
style to the family, 

<ii\<-- .i l)ip j<il» tO t\ 
Page 27 



The fabulous 

rise of 

Milner Products 

Page 30 

Is your product 
too offensive 
for television? 

Page 36 



Daytime: net 
tv's hottest 
battleground 

Page 38 



THE 

WHEELING 

INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION 
STORY BOARD 



ANNCR: Wheeling is the center 
of one of the fastest growing 
markets in America — the boom- 
ing Upper Ohio Valley . . . 




New I 


ndustry is 


moving 


in!— 


The gi 


j;antic Olin 


-Revere a 


lumi- 


num p 


ant w ill cover 1.100 


icres, 


has already been replanned from 


60,000 


tons to 


180,000 


tons 


yearly 


capacity. 








V^ 



This new plant plus accompany- 
ing power plants, coal mine-, 
and aluminum rolling mills will 
require more than 4,000 new 
employees . . . and attract many 
other "satellite industries." 






Established Industry is Ex- 
panding! — Weirton Steel Div. 
of National Steel Corp. has 
embarked on a vast expansion 
program, creating steady jobs 
for 13,500 employees. 



Weirton will have the world's 
speediest cold reducing tandem 
mill, largest reheating furnaces, 
widest slab yard, largest open 
hearth furnaces in the industry! 



II heeling is meeting the challenge 
— with such new civic improve- 
ments as this beautiful Ohio 
River bridge and expressway 
entry to the heart of the city . . . 





Increasing employment and 
swelling payrolls mean more 
spendable funds- for products 
advertised on WTRF-TV, the 
dominant television station in 
the \\ heeling market . . . 



m 



316,000 watts 

Equipped for network color 



For availabilities and complete coverage information 
—call Bob Ferguson, V. Pres. and Gen. Mgr., 
or Needham Smith, Sales Mgr.- Wheeling Ex- 
change — CEdar 2-7777 - or any George P. 
Hollingbery Co. Representative. 




reaching a market that's reaching new importance! 



• • 




• • 



more women 
listen to WPEN's 

950 CLUB 

than any other 
program in 
Philadelphia 



••••••• 




another reason why WPEN is first in local and national advertisers 



Represented Nationally by GILLPERNA INC. — New York, Chicogo, lot Angtlti. San Frorcsco 



SPONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



4 May 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 18 



wm 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Detroit takes to tv for the "family sell" 

27 How has car design influenced automotive advertising? Fashion-con- 
scious Detroit, selling style to the family, hands the job to television 

Milncr's sales jump 90-fold with air media 

30 Tv, radio and Howard Cohoon, Milner Products Co. president, put across 
Pine-Sol and Perma-Starch in a nine-year slam-bang distribution battle 

Why don't you buy more spot? 

33 Despite complexities of spot buying, agency heads questioned by SPONsok 
at last week's 4A's meeting saw an increase in spot volume for this year 

Is your product taboo on tv? 

36 F** w products are in bad taste says Raymond K. Maneval of Schwerin 
Research, it's the manner of presentation that can offend your audience 

Tv's hottest battleground 

38 Daytime competition between CBS and NBC has helped boost sets-in-use, 
new, live ABC programing in the fall will make it a three-way contest 



FEATURES 



50 Film Chart 

24 19th and Madison 

47 New and Renew 

62 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 New -maker of the Week 

58 Radio Results 

80 Reps at Work 

20 Sponsor Backstage 



76 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
84 Sponsor Speaks 
54 Spot Buys 
84 Ten Second Spots 
18 Timebuyers at Work 
82 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
73 Washington Week 
45 Women's Week 



In Next Week's Issue 

Renaissance of the radio commercial 

Creativit) of radio copy has undergone an upsurge of great vitality. 
What's behind it and what will you pay for a 1957-gradc commercial? 

Monthly tv cost and programing Comparagraph 

Fi itures include average cost by network program types; cost-per- 
thousand for top 10 nighttime and daytime network shows: spot I\ basics 









Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP— Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 

Advertising Staff 

Jane E. Perry 
George Becker 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 

Administrative Staff 

Octavia Engros 

M. Therese McHugh 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 






ED3| 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
1 61 E. Grand Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign $11. Sin- 
gle copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Publisned weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 




MOST EYES ARE ON KTHV 

IN ARKANSAS! 



INC 

ft* 
'Hi St. 
Trt- 
DHici: 
J, Los 
Phone: 
Elm 
Unite" 
I, Sin- 
es !» 

r. 17, 

*«' 

,J(H6 
Hit* 



KTHV is seen, heard, and gets regular viewing response 
throughout MOST of Arkansas! Please study the mail map 
above. Notice that it includes 62 Arkansas counties — notice 
KTHV's penetration to all six surrounding State borders, with 
mail actually being received from viewers in Mississippi, 
Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas! 

With 316,000 watts on Channel 11 and with the tallest antenna 
in the Central South (1756' abo\e average terrain) KTHV 
sells most of Arkansas. 

Your Branham man has all the big KTHV facts. Ask him! 




KTHV 



Channel 11 

LITTLE ROCK 
316,000 Watts 



Henry Clay, Executive Vice President B. G. Robertson, Giticrjl Mjtijger 

AFFILIATED WITH KTHS, LITTLE ROCK AND KWKH, SHREVEPORT 




WBZ has Boston's ear 

-the most! 



WBZ 1st in NSI Boston area 
audience, 6 A.M. to Midnight 

WBZ 1st in Boston total average 
audience, 6 A.M. to Midnight 

WBZ total station audience 
up 25% since November 1956 

WBZ total station audience 48% 
greater than second Boston station 



>*rrr 







(February, 1957 NIELSEN STUDY) 



Sales jump when WBZ whispers in Boston's ear! And, 
with "The Big Plus", the bonus coverage provided by 
WBZA, Springfield, Massachusetts, WBZ's large and 
loyal audience increases to a whopping total of 2,872,870 
radio families throughout New England. Most of these 
people make a habit of keeping their radio dials tuned to 
WBZ+WBZA. 

You talk to customers when you talk to WBZ+WBZA 
listeners. So why not get the selling impact of WBZ+WBZA 
behind your product? Speak your spiel where people will 
hear it . . . and act on it. 

Bill Williamson, WBZ+WBZA Sales Manager, will tell 
you how. Ask your operator for ALgonquin 4-5670, 
Boston. Or call Alexander W. "Bink" Dannenbaum, Jr., 
WBC Vice President— Sales, MUrray Hill 7-0808, in 
New York. 

In Boston . . . and all New England ... no selling cam- 
paign is complete without the WBC stations — 





WBZ • BOSTON 

plus WBZA • SPRINGFIELD 
WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



©o 



RADIO — WBZ + WBZA BOSTON-SPRINGFIELD . . . KDKA PITTSBURGH . . . 
KYW. CLEVELAND . . . WOWO FORT WAYNE . . . WIND. CHICAGO . . . 
KEX. PORTLAND. ORE. 

TELEVISION — WBZ TV. BOSTON ... K DK A-TV . PITTSBURGH ... KVWTV. 
CLEVELAND . . . KPIX. SAN FRANCISCO 

WIND REPRESENTED BY A M RADIO SALES 

KPIX REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY. INC. 

ALL OTHER WBC STATIONS 

REPRESENTED BY PETERS. GRIFFIN. WOODWARD. INC. 



NEWSMAKER 

of the week 



The news: The appointment of ( Inn Irs II. Browei as general 
manage i oj l>lil><> apparently seta »/ rest the issue "I " successor to 
tin- (tiling president Ben Duffy. Brower, who had been executive 
vice president in charge "I creative services, was named on the 
joint recommendation of lhtj]\ and Board Chairman Bruce Barton. 



The newsmaker: Homespun, lank) Charlie Browei has 
created hi- v\av through advertising without being affected in the 
leas) bj the atmosphere and airs "I Madison We. He was describing 
himself rather than i hi- agenc) when he told sponsor three /ears 
igo: "BBDO has no class) front. Some people ma) think oi us as 
countn bumpkins compared to other agencies, hut our clients can 
relax with us." He takes over the rein- ol the nation's Fourth lai 
agenc) with the approval not onl) "I Duff) and Barton bul the 
people who work with him. The warm feeling "I BBDO personnel 
for Brower is unmistakable. Hi- 
fatherlv approach toward BBDO 
writers and artists is as much a re- 
spect for people as it is for the 
i reative process. 

\\ hile Brower has warned of the 
dangers to creative advertising 
through over-emphasis on research, 
he i> in> enem) of research. I he 
danger, he believes, is not that oj 
research squeezing out the creative 
worker hut ol the creative worker 
depending too much on research. 
"The creative man i- always look- 
ing for help, always feeling in- 
secure," Brower said last week. "If 
he leans too much on research, all advertising will look alike: it II 
all be equall) had." But Brower would also like to be known as a 
friend ol research, which he think- has made big contributions. 

Regarding commercials, Brower is convinced the) are getting 
better. Tv . he said, i- learning hov\ to attract people to the adver- 
tising message without getting too gimmicky. "The) are getting 
easier to take."" he said, "or, at [east, that's how I feel." 

The question of a sii<ce--or to Brower ha- not \et been settled. 
There remain- a possibility that none will he appointed. One p 
is that the new plan- hoard set up under the chairmanship ol Robert 
I.. Foreman iwho was made BBDO- filth executive vice president at 
the time the hoard was -el up) has been takinu over some ol the 
functions of Brower's office. While Foreman will continue in charge 
>t all tv-radio activities, he will he relieved of some administrative 
details b) Henninio Tra\ iesas. who was just named head of the 
tv-radio department. Traviesas had been head of Luck) Strike's 
tv-radio activities for seven years. ^ 




0o«'t b€ MOred 

he u4«d to be one of us 

BBDO <irti\t II illiam I'm, 

ili-s, nlirs ,: | ■." tion 

to Brower's appointment 



The tiut^- 
about the 
NEGRO 
MARKET 



^Zp THE FULL STORY 
FROM K-SAY 

The only Northern California 

station selling the entire San 

Francisco, Oakland, Bay Area 

Negro market 

II' of talent in 

the at 

ttionall) i 

• MAGNIFICENT MONTAGUE 

- brought dir. 1 1 t o in WAAF 
Chicago Hi 

results and audiei 
ruficenl 

• RAMON BRUCE 

W \ \ I N( ■ u \ i I • 
• appeal pi reonalitj u 
I lest r.niMu- ami • . b 
i during ln~ broadi 

• SWINGING DEACON 

— The mosl popul u 
appeal i" rsonalit) I > m 
the heavily populate 

and /rirj/,*. an 

Plus OtJb 
Great Negro Stars '. 

TELL IT-SELL IT 

on the NEW 

K-SAY 



10,000 WATTS 



1010 KC 



Stto 

1550 California Street, San Francisco 
1815 Alcatraz Avenue. Berkeley 

WALT CONWAY 

■ 

lionally 

JOHN E PEARSON I COMPANY 



GRANT WRATHALL 



- K-SAY 

* c i ' i ' | ■ 1 1 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SPONSOR 



4 mai 1951 



MORE LIGHT OP 



* Monday- Friday average, Second March Report NT1 



DAYTIM1 



I 




Out of the 38 
sponsored network 
quarter hours 
between 7 a.m. and (> p.m. 
CBS Television 
Avins the biggest 
audiences in 29 . . . 
the second ranking 
network wins in 5 . . . 
the third network in 4 



1 




NEW DATA PROVES AGAIN 

that WNHC-TV, New Haven- 
Hartford, is the dominant sta- 
tion — by an overwhelming 
margin— in a 14-county area, 
covering 896,000 TV hot 
Sign on to sign off, seven days 
a week, WNHC-TV delivers 
average audiences 210% 
greater than top New York 
City station; 244% greater 
than Hartford; 174% greater 
than New Britain. Your KATZ 
man has the proof : ARB, Nov. 
L956; PULSE, Oct. 1956; 
NIELSEN NCS #2, 1956. 





WNHC-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 

Channel 8 

ABC-TV* CBS-TV 
Represented by KATZ 



operated by: Radio and Television Dlv. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 4-6th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM ♦ TV, Philadelphia, Pa./wNBF-AM*FM*TV. Binghamton, N. Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg. Pa. /WFBG-AM • TV. Altoona, Pa. /WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 

National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 

ESPECIALLY IN HARTFORI 




mat lignificant h and ndio 

With inlrrprrtalinn 
in depth lor butj readrrs 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



4 MAY 

C*pyrl|hl IM7 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Detroit's gravitation toward \\ and radio as prime media l<>i selling 1958 
models continaed to gather momentum this week. 

Willi In divisions "I the Big Three manufacturers ahead) committed, these othei . 
|iccis are now in the process "I shaping up: 

• Fdsel. scheduled to make its bow tlii- fall, apparent!) is shoppii t\ 
network Beries (in addition to specials costing about 8350,000 each). 

• The Chrysler Imperial division ma) come through with i series ol ti own. 

• Pontiac is expected i" move into the network picture via the specials cut"- 

• Nash can l>r counted on for tv-radio participation, once it- reorganizal 
have been settled. 

I See What's Behind Detroit's ^l(M) Million \ii Budget, page 27, for what i- n 
this terrific Detroit air romance. 1 



c« iininil ments f< ir the 1 1 imins 



From present indications, Detroit uill spend at least 2595 mure in prime-time net- 
work tv during 1957-58 than in the current season. 

About 10 r f of this increase ma) be credited to higher time and proj I fo- 

rest is from the heart. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE's estimates of Detroit's network h 
son are: 

iALENTCOSI 

$3,000,000 

10,000,000 

2,750,000 





NO. SHOWS 


Buick 




2 


( li«\ rolet 




2 


( Ihrysler Corp. 




1 


Dodge 




2 


DeSoto 




1 


Ford 




4 


GM part-, etc. 




1 


Lincoln-Mercur) 




1 


Oldsmobile 


,') 


specs • 


l'l\ mouth 




2 



1,500,000 
1,000 
5,300,000 
3,400,000 
3,750,000 
2,100,000 
2,350,000 



! IMI COS! 

$2,800,000 
7,500,000 
0,000 
1,600,000 
1. inn. i ii mi 

,, 700,000 
2,100.000 
3300,000 
1,200,000 
3,200,000 



lOTAl 
$5,80 
17,501 

6,10 

3,000 

5,50 



GRAND TOTAL 16 500.000 I 000,000 

Note: Time costs are net to the advertiser. 

See \eu . Wrap-up. page (>2. for li-t of automotive programs.) 



What about automotive spot? Here's how to gauge that: i>m*> the network .ml i- 
Btraightened out, individual-station schedules will get their inning. Good 



The $5.5 million (gross) spread thai Ford is baying on < BS Radio thi* fall 
will have the umbrella title The Ford Road Show. 

If anvhod\ can get awa) from this bombardment, lord figures, he moat I"- deaf. 
Moreover. Ford has added this bit of insurance: I ach of the daih personality irles 

CoUingwood, Arthur Godfrey, Bing Crosby, Rosemarj Cloone) and Edward I!. Murroa will 
be followed bv an announcement to "Listen to the nexl Ford -ho*."* 

\ sidelight on the Ford deal that delight- the competitive networks: Ford's domina- 
tion of the CBS Radio schedule is so scattered that other automotive* will have to 
buy elsewhere. 



SPONSOR 



4 MAY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Time was when Detroit thought only in terms of exclusive identity. 

Now Buick (Ford really blazed the trail) is buying alternate sponsorship in 
Wells Fargo. 

In other words: Like the packaged goods people, the car manufacturers want cir- 
culation, frequency, and minimum risk as well as explicit identification. More and more, 
they are behaving like the makers of a family product. 

NBC TVs healthy pickup in daytime business was a big help in creating a 
favorable margin of 7.8% between the first quarters of 1957 and 1956. 

PIB reports NBC TV's initial 1957 billings as $47,987,966, against $44,495,804 for the 
first three months of 1956. The difference represents roughly $3.5 million, of which $2 mil- 
lion came from daytime. 

PIB's calculations also show: 

Gross first-quarter time charges for the three networks were 8.4% better than 
a year ago. In March alone the upturn amounted to 7.3%. 

Westerns appear to be holding a steady pace on the tv networks. 

At SPONSOR-SCOPE's request, Nielsen supplied these ratings: 

PERIOD NO. WESTERNS AVG. SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
March 1956 7 36.9% 

October 1956 7 41.8% 

March 1957 8 40.0% 

Note: Statistically, the 1.8% difference between the last two averages could be wiped out 
by probable margin of error. 

Nielsen was asked by SPONSOR-SCOPE this week how daily tv viewing and 
radio listening per day have stacked up over the past three years. The answer: 

PERIOD HOME VIEWING RADIO LISTENING 

Jan. 1955 5 hrs., 49 mins. 2 hrs., 31 mins. 

Jan. 1956 6 hrs., 1 min. 2 hrs., 16 mins. 

Jan. 1957 6 hrs., 4 mins. 2 hrs., 12 mins. 

How big a difference in radio listening is created by heat or cold? In short, 
does summer drive 'em away? The answer is that during the afternoons and evenings 
there is no difference. Winter mornings, however, seem to have somewhat of an 
edge. 

In terms of millions of homes per minute, Nielsen shows: 

HOMES 
5.2 
6.6 
6.1 
6.2 
4.0 
4.1 

The radio networks could well go back to exploiting a favorite promotion 
device of the 1930s: citing with pride the number of 100 leading national ad- 
vertisers using the medium. 

According to a SPONSOR-SCOPE check, 45 members of this bluechip list for 
1956 either are now in network radio or were there since 1 January 1957: 

ABC 13 CBS 27 NBC 20 MBS 7 

10 SPONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



PERIOD 


TIME 


July 1956 


Morning, Mon.-Fri. 


Jan. 1957 


Morning, Mon.-Fri. 


July 1956 


Afternoon, Mon.-Fri 


Jan. 1957 


Afternoon, Mon.-Fri 


July 1956 


Nights — 7 days 


Jan. 1957 


Nights — 7 days 



^ 



SPONSOR-SCOPE contuuud 



Amid recent grumbling about spot ami its ;rowth problemt See 5P0NS0R-SC0P1 
21 \pril. page 9), this week was filled with excitemenl oi othei kinds. New bosfaseas , heered 
tlic fraternity, for one thing. For another, ideas ami problem! bobbed up on rarious im- 
portanl fronts. 

In all, these live highlights were noteworthv : 

HIGHLIGHT NO. 1: Kellogg acting on the premise ilut it gol int.. spot h 

loo little ami loo late i- planning to add $.'i million lor daytime Spot to it- l\ budget 

via Burnett* 

I In- target i- kids; the type of programing depends on what K. ivailable 

and acceptable. 

Preferred is a half-hour atrip Monday through Iriday either 1 ■ v t - .. r film) with 
alternate sponsorship a possibility. One taboo: No competition with Mickej Moan 

Dimensions of the campaign: The top 15 markets. 

Kellogg currently is spending between 13 and -I million in network and spot ii 

kels i Superman and Wild Hill Hiekok -hows), making il around ^7 million in ill. 

HIGHLIGHT NO. 2: FCB's Vn Pardoll is asking industry cooperation 

in keeping NCS#2 updated a- to changes in power, frequency, prog] etc. 

Pardoll'a thought is that a standardized form should be the first step. So he'i solicit- 
ing re|>s for suggestions. 

Some reps think (hi- information -hould be channeled through Nielsen. 

HIGHLIGHT NO. 3: The "piggyback" i- meeting mounting objection! 

from tv .stations. 

\- a reminder: A '"piggyback" is a minute commercial which pair- messages for two 
products on the same -trip of film — like the Ted Mate- agency's currenl twin plugs foi M&M 
Candy and Uncle Ben's Rice (both owned by the same firm). 

Prime objection to "piggybacks": Station- feel the) are a device for evading purchase 
of two 20-second spots. 

HIGHLIGHT NO. 4: idam Young is doing a three-part updating on 
radio's "profile" — the first part of which will go to advertisers and agencies this "■■ 

Part I deals with the importance of focusing the ad campaign at local amliem • - 
how stations fit into this marketing concept. 

Part II will appraise the matter of coverage and define \shat tin- spot advertiser should 
look for in facilities. 

Part III will treat with rate structure vis-a-vis cost-per-thousand. 

HIGHLIGHT NO. 5: Mere*- an innovation by a major Madison \\e. rep 

organization that can have l>r«uid repercu-sion- in the field of selling: I be sales develop- 
ment director, like salesmen, now shares in commissions. 

The philosophy behind the move: As a medium becon ipetitive, 

requires more factual support: hence the fellow wh k- up the script i- entitled t.. the 

same consideration as the fellow who spiel- it. 

Lorillard is testing its new mentholated brand — Newport — on the Weal < oa-l. 
Distribution should be national by mid-summer. 

The next wholesale search of film vault- *i!l he tor old ne wared shots. 
F'rudentiaPs forthcoming The 20th Century series will make massive use of men 

library clips in documentary sequences. 

Between S3.5 and S4 million has been appropriated for this mixture of half-hour and 
hour programs on CBS TV. Reach & MrClinton i« the agency. 



SPONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



11 



12 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continue,! 



Like P&G, General Foods will be riding high on daytime tv next season. 

In a radical reversal of its attitude toward daytime tv, General Foods' plans now call for: 

• A cutback to as few as five nighttime network shows, and 

• I he sponsoring of at least nine daytime programs. 

GF's daytime blueprint includes continued sponsorship of the Mickey Mouse Club on 
ABC TV. expansion of its CBS 'J'V commitments, and the addition of four program strips 
on NBC TV. 

The motivations for the switch are these: 

1 I Broader diversification and frequency of network scheduling. 

2) As night networks' costs continue up, daytime tv offers a chance for economical buys. 

General Foods' tv budget remains what it was during the 1956-57 season, but the allo- 
cation will swing from 75% nighttime and 25% daytime to a 50-50 split. 



P&G is in no rush to decide whether it wants to continue its partnership with 
General Foods 9-9:30 on CBS TV Monday nights. It has until 15 May to decide. 

Meantime GF will have to wait in making final fall plans. If P&G elects to pull out, 
General Foods will sponsor Danny Thomas by itself. 

The sales gap between NBC Radio and CBS Radio is closing rapidly. 

How fast the runner-up — NBC Radio — has been galloping can be measured by these 
contrasting figures: 

• In April 1956, CBS Radio was six hours ahead of NBC Radio. 

• This April less than 25 minutes separates the two. 

Source: PIB's reports on sponsored radio. (PIB makes a check on the number of hours 
sponsored on each network the first of the month.) 

No sooner had NBC TV broken down the old taboo about competitive adjacencies 
(the protection is now limited to two or three brands) when another cropped up. It concerns 
product adjacencies. 

For instance: 

• The cigarettes kick up a row any time a mouthwash, dentifrice, breath-sweetening 
gum, or even a digestive aid is put next to them. 

• Cold remedies sizzle if a citrus account is on either side, because Sunkist's copy oc- 
casionally claims therapeutic value. 

The squeeze is not a happy one for NBC TV — particularly on Tuesday nights. The 

cigarettes are so slotted on that night that they can block out a long list of potential sponsors. 

(For details on the new rules on product protection see 2 Feb. SPONSOR-SCOPE, p. 9.) 

Pretty amazing to Madison Ave. is the amount of money that Kraft spends on 
merchandising its Wednesday night show on NBC TV. 
The weekly budget is $5,000. 

Incidentally, the Kraft Theatre goes into its 11th year next week. 

K&E's Max Uhl will unveil a definitive compendium on tv during the agency's 
annual management conclave at Lake Placid 15-18 May. 

Referred to as the "Television Bible," the presentation treats with tv's: 

• General principles in media buying and programing. 

• Audience and merchandising impact. 

• Best methods of approach. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 47; Spot Buys, page 54; News and Idea Wrap-up, page 62; Washington 
Week, page 73; sponsor Hears, page 76; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 82. 

SPONSOR • 4 may 1957 



■■ STA. "A" 15.6° 
■■■■■PUi 

STA. "B" 13.2% 



STA. "C" 8.8% 

■■■1 STA. "D" 5.9% 

■■ STA. "E" 4.5% 

■I STA. "F" 4.3% 

■ STA. "G" 4.1% . 
■ 
IB STA. "IT 3.7% I 

\E STA. "I" 3.6% 



TA. "J" 1.6% , 

? m 

OTHERS 2.6% 




Another Hooper* Run-Away Report From Miami: 

WQAM nets more than twice the daytime 
audience of the runner-up station 

. /// 3 Agree: First it was Hooper . . . then Trendex . . . 
Now PULSE shows WQAM in FIRST PLACE 



Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m. to midnight. Feb. -March, 1957. 



Send for a Blair man . . . or call WQAM. G . ndler 

•7 a.m. -6 p.m. Mori. -Sat.. March-April, 1957. 



WQAM 

Serving all of Southern Florida 
wi/h 5 000 woffs on 560 he 

MIAMI 



Today's Radio for Today's Selling 



TODD STORZ, 
President 



WDGY WHB 


WQAM 


Minneapolis-St. Paul Kansas City 


Miami 


Represented by John Blair & Co. 





KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



IF YOU 








MJJL^l 




(THE MILLIONAIRE) 



SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 
SOLD 




n the past 6 days on WCBS-TV, New York 

n the past 6 days to WGN-TV, Chicago 

n the past 6 days to WFAA-TV, Dallas 

n the past 6 days to' KTLA, Los Angeles 

n the past 6 days to CKLW-TV, Detroit-Windsor 

n the past 6 days to KHQ-TV, Spokane 

n the past 6 days to KLFY-TV, Lafayette, La. 

n 8 Southern markets 

to BLUE PLATE FOODS, New Orleans 



^v 



77as/>/ 




Million-dollar 

March Nielsen of 38.0 just scored by 
the first runs of THE MILLIONAIRE 
. . . 51.3 r r share of audience! 2nd highest 
rating of any dra?na scries on television! 



You'll feel like a million when you ki 
off the biggest ratings in your market with 
IFYOU HADA MILLION-! 

show of thi 1 your MCA TV 

representative today! 




I 



A DON FEDDERSON PRODUCTION OF 39 HALF-HOUR FILM HITS 
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE TO REGIONAL AND LOCAL ADVERTISERS 



mm 



NUMBER 1 ! 



of all film adrtnfure programi 




NO. 1 NATIONALLY (PULSE-FEBRUARY) PLU 
TOP OF THE TOP TEN FIRST RATINGS IN EVERY MARKET 

Look at these first ratings and audience shares! (ARB-Jan. Feb. Mar.) 



#1 in CHICAGO 
#2 in MINNEAPOLIS 
#2 in JACKSONVILLE 
#1 in CHICO 
#5 in ATLANTA 
#5 in LOS ANGELES 
#2 in HARRISBURG 
#3 in STOCKTON 



22.4 38% shore 
173 35% share 
41.3 74% share 
57.3 88% share 
203 54% share 
16.9 19% share 
23.3 54% share 
22.3 49% share 



#6 in CORPUS CHRISTI 31.9 45% share 

#2 in ALBUOUEROUE 



#1 In ST. LOUIS 
#1 in PEORIA 
#2 in SAN ANTONIO 
#4 in BAKERSFIELD 
#7 in OMAHA 
#3 in SCRANTON 
#4 in TULSA 
#8 in BOSTON 
#2 in MEMPHIS 
28.9 61% share 



37.1 

38.0 

31.0 

35.2 



20.7 



263 



75% share 
70% share 
58% share 
67% share 
42% share 
49% share 
48% share 
60% share 
44% share 



ROD CAMERON stars in 39 roaring-with-action 

half-hour adventures srt against the breath-taking Nevada backdrop 

...Las Vegas, Virginia City, Boulder Dam, Reno, Lake Tal 

Mojave Desert. Produced bj REV1 E PRODUCTIONS. 




ALREADY SOLD IN 181 MARKETS 

to these important regional buyers: Retinoids Tobacco Company, 
Lipton Tea, Falstaff Bri wing (72 marh ts), Kroger Supermarh ts, 
Coca-Cola, General Electric, Schlitz Beer, Hamm Brewing, 
Carting R,< icing, Schmidt & Sons Bn <>■< rs, National Bis* uii 
Company, Prina Macaroni, RKO Teleradio, Si;/" Milk Prod 
Gold Bond Bti r . . . plus troops of local stations and advertisers! 



\Check MCA today - be "Top Ten" in your mar! 



DuD@ 




Write, wire, phone your MCA TV Film Representative 

598 Modison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 

(PLaza 9-7500) and principal cities everywhere 



ftw 



Can You 
Top TWs? 











WOW-TV 

6 



CHANNEL 

BLAIR TV, Representative 
FRED EBENER, Sales Manager 



A 
MEREDITH 
STATION 



© 



OMAHA, 
NEBRASKA 






18 



I Timebuye 
at work 




Bob Fountain, Young & Rubicam, New York, all-media buyer for 
General Foods, comments: "Radio is traditionally a highly flexible 
medium used, to a large extent, to saturate a market quickly during 
a short period of time. The negotiation for this time may have to 
be completed in a matter of hours and this requires accurate and 
comprehensive availability infor- 
mation. These availabilities are 
the basis of all purchases and it is 
this starting point from which 
values are projected and conclu- 
sions drawn. Availabilities usual- 
ly include the time period of the 
show and its cost, but all too fre- 
quently ratings are omitted and 
the amount of commercial time 
in the program is seldom shown. 
Amount of commercial time is 
usually a mystery to the adver- 
tiser, remaining in the realm of exclusive station information. Why 
so? This data is a yardstick of station management, and the per- 
formance of our advertising depends on the commercial load car- 
ried by a program. Any indication of commercial time on shows 
would put a new light on the buving and would provide the 
prospective purchaser with another valuable tool for evaluation." 



Art Topol, Donahue & Coe, New York, timebuyer for Kasco Dog 
Food, says: '"The "1" in timebuyers is for telephone discovered by 
Don 'Bell' Ameche which is a constant companion for the harried 
timebuyer. 'F is for the numerous idiosyncrasies of this wonderful 
and fascinating business known commonly as advertising. 'M' is 

for the middlemen called station 
reps who try to mesmerize the 
buyer in favor of his station. 'E' 
is for the economy, efficiency and 
energy that the buyer utilizes on 
the expenditure of the advertiser. 
'B' is for the brides that all good 
secretaries become when they are 
fully trained. 'U' is for the ubiq- 
uity of avails, ratings, cost-per- 
1.000's. paper work, schedules, 
and so forth. '\ ' is for yesterday 
which is the day most buyers usu- 
ally require requested avails. 'E' is for the entertainment and en- 
thusiasm that is a trade mark of advertising people. 'R' is for the 
various ratings that are helpful, confusing and only indicators, not 
the gospel. 'S' is for the stations throughout the country that provide 
the time which buyers use for their advertiser's messages. Put them 
all together — they spell 'timebuyers.' They mean the world to me!" 




SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



EXCLUSIVE ABC 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

KliiiU-IU 




APPOINTS 

BLAIR 




ASSOCIATES 



INC. 



as exclusive national representative effective May 1, 1957 . . . BLAIR offices in 

New York Detroit St. Louis Los Angeles Boston 

Chicago Jacksonville San Francisco Dallas Seattle 



the new KGEO-TV tower 



1386' ABOVE AVERAGE TERRAIN • FULL POWER 100,000 WATTS 



SPONSOR • 4 may 1957 19 



by Joe Csida 



IN THE BILLION DOLLAR 

COLUMBUS, GA. markit 

WRBL 

55% MORE* 

radio homes 
delivered 




*55% MORE THAN STATION "B" 

Day or night monthly — NCS No. 2 
WRBL also leads in day or night weekly, day- 
time weekly, and daytime daily. 



2 2 2 MORE 

TV homes 

WRBL-TV offers 222% 
MORE TV HOMES THAN STATION "B" 

W R D L ■ 1 V ! First Prize 
Winner in promotion of the Ray 
Anthony Show. 

Merchandising and promotion of your 
show on WRBL or WRBL-TV receives 
the attention of the same people who 
won this award as the best in the 
nation. 

WRBL 



AM - FM - TV 



COLUMBUS. GEORGIA 



CALL HOLLINGBERY CO. 









20 









Sponsor 




Agencies should be in show business 

Ever since the first medicine man leaped off the 
tail board of his wagon to pass out the snake 
oil to the crowd his coterie of performers had 
softened up via entertainment, show business 
has been utilized to sell merchandise. And effec- 
tively. The radio-tv departments of agencies, 
large and small, of course, are essentially show 
business wings of their shops. But apart from the 
obvious and vital need for activitj in radio-tv, many agencies have 
also profitably dabbled in other show business areas for their clients. 

Philip Morris, for example, currentlv has a live country music 
show out on the road, playing to thousands and thousands of folks 
and selling plenty of cigarettes. And in recent weeks Young & 
Rubicam and the D'Arcy Agency respectively have inaugurated 
activities in two other key entertainment industry branches. Both 
involve large investments, but open new avenues in advertising. 

Y&R has made a deal with one of the smartest showmen and 
businessmen ever to take a few million dollars from Sam Goldwyn. 
I am talking about a gent I have written about previously, by the 
name of Frank Loesser. Last time I did a piece about the writer 
of such Broadwav hits as "Guys and Dolls" and "Most Happy 
Fella." as a matter of fact, he wired me that he would gladly accept 
my hand in marriage. Since I have no desire to commit bigamy, and 
another eulogy of Mr. Loesser is somewhat beside my present point, 
anyway, I will merely sav that if Frank is involved in the Y&R deal 
it will be great. 

It is a big investment but one which will pay off 

You may be sure that it has already cost Y&R a substantial sum 
of money. And you may be equally sure that Y&R will get their sub- 
stantial sum's worth. For in my own personal dealings with Mr. L. 
I have always found him. as has every one else I've ever known who 
has had to dicker a dicker with him. a hard bargainer, a man who 
insisted on amounts to make you gasp. But also a man who. having 
made you add a few zeros to the check, will break his very back to 
make sure he delivers up to a standard \ ou scarcely dared hope for. 

You can place your bets right now that out of \&R. as a result of 
their deal with LoesseFs Frank Productions. Inc.. will come some 
of the brightest, most powerful sales jingles in all the history of ad- 
vertising. You may depend on seeing exciting innovations in sales 
presentations, spots, program themes and any other phase of the 
agency's activities to which Mr. L. lends his incredible talents. \ &R 
is to be complimented on acquiring Mr. Loesser's services, and 
thanked for blazing another portion of the show business-agency 
trail I'm discussing here. For the proper utilization of music in 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



rU 



AND STILL CHAMPION! 



IT'S THE 
THIRD 
CONSECUTIVE 

YEAR 
WE'VE WON 

BILLBOARD'S 
FIRST PLACE 

AWARD 
IN EVERY 

LAB 
CATEGORY 



All ■ ire more than 

tlu- coveted Mil lb 

in .ill. And \ 
sincere thanks to al! ot you in the TV industl 

iblc. 
At CFI our one desii mm 

omy for our clients by providing compli 

at the greatest speed it with qualn 

takes more than desire to make a winner. We km .v. 
could not have won without the finest equipmi 
the determination to please and dedicated personnel 
comprising the best creative technicians in the work) 

very special thanks to led Hirsch. Lab Superintendent; 

Ted Fogelman, 16mm Su| 
Ed Reichard, Chief Engineer and their r> 



SID SOLOW/l /' 



The CFI Bill' 



1953 CFI won the first place award for quality. 

1954 Three laboratory categories. CFI scored a grand slam" 
winning all 3 first place awards for quality, speed, and economy 

1955 Three laboratory categories. CFI again scored a "grand slam" 
winning all 3 first place awards for quality, speed, and economy 

1956 Seven laboratory categories. CFI scores its third consecutive 
"grand slam" winning all 7 first place awards . . . 

UK. HI si Q( Alll\ PI • \X Hilt 

I \sllsl SERVK t PR 

UK 



CONSOLIDi 



INDUSTRIES 



HOLLYWOOD: 959 SEWARD ST. HOLLYWOOD 9 1441 

NEW YORK: 521 W. 57TH ST. CIRCLE 7 4400 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



21 



KORl audience 
in lonsing 

20 to 1 P°* er 



5000 



uvtw 



WMtt 



_-W\ar. '57 Hooper 
In Lansing Shows 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



7 -.00 a.m.— 
\l noon 

\l noon— 
6:00 p.m- 



Y^ll.S Station B 
26.6 



58.9 
54.6 



32.7 



IAMSIMG 



More listeners than 

all other stations 

heard in 
Lansing combined 

* Ja n. thru Mar. average 
C. E. Hooper, Inc. 



«, . a(> >as sports 

music & 



Represented Nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 



22 



Sponsor backstage continued 



every sense is a vital part of show business and can be an increas- 
ingly vital part of any advertising and merchandising business. 

\\ hub rather naturally takes us to the D'Arcy Agencv-Budweiser 
excursion into still another show business area. I did a SPONSOR 
column well over a year ago timidly proposing that major adver- 
tisers and agencies might consider the idea of finding and develop- 
ing their own stars from scratch, rather than laying several million 
dollars on the line for a performer who has suddenly become hot. 
I said this anent the multi-million dollar Jackie Gleason deal. 

I'm not sure I though I hope to talk to the D'Arcy and Bud peo- 
ple at great length to find out about this I that the agency-sponsor 
talent development program I suggested is what D'Arcy and the 
Budweiser folks have in mind. I do hear that they are "sponsoring" 
a new boy singer named Steve Schulte. They have recorded four 
sides with him, and are having these released by the ABC-Paramount 
record division. 

With talent and proper handling stars can be created 

Recently they paid the line charges to have the lad picked up and 
carried on the NBC TV Tonight show doing two 15-minute spots 
from a brewer's convention in Texas. I understand they are look- 
ing for additional radio and tv time on which to present him. and 
that they are putting the full resources of their field staffs behind 
the promotion of his records. 

If this young man is a talented singer, and the people in charge 
of his development are experienced and intelligent show managers, 
there is no reason in the world why he cannot be built into a tre- 
mendously exciting attraction. If the agency is successful in so 
building him, he should become an exceedingly valuable advertising 
and merchandising weapon for his Budweiser backers — more valu- 
able in that he will be associated with Budweiser from the start. 

There have, of course, been many other occasional examples of 
agencies and advertisers utilizing entertainment in off-beat fashion 
as a powerful merchandising weapon. Some sponsors have bank- 
rolled and distributed tv film series. During the war the Esty 
agency did a remarkable job for Camel cigarettes with star-studded 
live shows playing service camps and bases. 

The appliance and auto makers have presented spectacular live 
shows on tours and at conventions. 

My point, however, is that no single agency has yet considered 
show business and its potential for selling merchandise as a medium 
with which to work fully and continuously in the same sense that 
the agencies work with radio and television. 

It may just be that one of these days a Y&R, or one of its bright 
competitors will set up a vice president in charge of show business 
merchandising, including radio-tv. 

And under him a department which will utilize the finest music 
writing, publishing and exploitation talent available: which will find 
and develop powerhouse performers; which will assemble and put 
into operation show companies on tours, etc. Which, in short, will 
utilize show business" magic in helping to move merchandise. ^ 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



Formula For Sales: 



NCS 



*2X 



PULSE 



_ ACTUAL 
" AUDIENCE 



This is the 29-county area in which 
NIELSEN gives KCMC-TV 25% 
or MORE weekly coverage. 



AREA TELEPULSE (February, 1957) 
of this same area shows KCMC-TV 
clearly dominates this area with an 
audience MORE THAN 2 Vi TIMES 
that of the second station -Providing 

DOMINATE SERVICE 

TO 

117,100 TV HOMES 



TELEPULSE - TOTAL WEEKLY 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE 




KCMC-TV. .49% 

STATION "B" 197o 

STATION "C" \l°7° 

ALL OTHERS 197o 



/// this area there are: 

575,000 PEOPLE 
166,000 HOUSEHOLDS 

$600,000,000 Consumer 

Spendable Income 
$450,000,000 RETAIL SALES 

200,000 FARM POPULATION 



Interconnected 

CBS-ABC 

Texarkana,Tex.-Ark. 



KCMC-TV 



Maximum Power 
100,000 WATTS 
Channel 6 



Represented by Venard, Rintoul and McConnell, Inc. 

WALTER M. WINDSOR, General Manager RICHARD M. PETERS, Commercial M., 



sponsor • 4 m a 1957 



23 



Handy Bookmark Series 




Keep your place 
in Los Angeles 
with KTTV 



24 




49th ant 
Madison 



MFA Mutual fire sale 

Maybe sponsor readers would enjoy 
this memo sent to us by Felix Hen- 
drickson, MFA Mutual supervisor in 
Arkansas. As you know MFA Mutual 
uses many radio and tv stations and 
encourages our agents to be air-active. 
Announcer Eddie Goetze of Radio 
Station KTLO of Mountain Home, 
Arkansas, had one for the public Fri- 
day morning, April 5th when the fire 
department answered a call at the 
home of Hiram Byrd where a flue fire 
had the wall paper ablaze. 

We quote: "We interrupt this pro- 
gram to give you the location of the 
fire. The Mountain Home Fire De- 
partment is answering a call to the 
fire in the Hiram Bvrd residence on 
College Street. THIS FIRE AN- 
NOUNCEMENT IS BROUGHT TO 
YOU, (chuckle . . . now this is a good 
one . . . chuckle, chuckle ... no folks 
this isn't funnv! . . . chuckle) 
THROUGH THE COURTESY OF 
HIRAM BYRD. MFA MUTUAL IN- 
SURANCE AGENCY. And reminding 
you, don't wait until it's too late, see 
your MFA Mutual Insurance Agent 
today. See Hiram Byrd for all your 
insurance needs. I repeat — the loca- 
tion of the fire is at the home of Hiram 
Byrd on College Street." 
W. Judd Wyatt 
director of advertising, 
MFA Mutual Insurance Co. 
Columbia, Mo. 

Convention controversy 

I have just gone through your April 
20 issue and found some things of in- 
terest and some things that I question. 

I agree with some of the points you 
make regarding the NARTB conven- 
tion, in your editorial page, and I say 
the headquarter staff is entitled to a 
pat on the back — but evidently, I did 
not attend the same convention you 
did. It was the biggest — it was well 
organized — it was sober — it was hap- 
py — but I don't think it was the most 
constructive convention, when I stop 
and think of the problems which face 
this industry. 

Editors of publications should help 
lead an industry and I know you fight 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



fen things which strengthen the in- 

dustry, Take anothei g I look al 

t F t i ~. convention and help the industn 
think about how to do better in the 
future. 

\inl maj I mention "This we fighl 
for" I take exception to your point 

linsl private firms doing the work 
in research. Go back ini<> history and 

think about what happened when the 

industr) trie<l to do a job. I am sure 
\( S #2 is the best thai has been done 
tu date and I am sure thai if the bu) - 
er. Beller and research firm, workinc 
with VJRF, gel together, thej can find 
ways of making the research better. 
Edgar Kobak 

Business Consultant. \etc ) oil. 
Salesmen select SPONSOR 

You will undoubtedly be pleased t<> 

learn that our local sale- staff ha- voted 
SPONSOR "The Time Sale-men'- Mosl 
Valuable Magazine.'' This we believe 
i- the reflection of their desire not 
onlj to keep abreast of advertiser and 
agenc) activities, bul to obtain ideas 
which the) ma) use to adapt to local 
situations. 

In liiiht of this high honor accord- 
ed SPONSOR, we wish to obtain sub- 
scriptions for each of them. 

Iu>\ M. Schwartz, advertising 
& sales promotion infer.. 

WBZ & WW/. I 

What about reprints? 

In your very fine publication, you fre- 
quent l\ have articles which we can use 
to advantage in contacting local, re- 
gional and national accounts. Thev 
arc always extremely appreciative of 
this information and frequently it is 
helpful in securing new business. 

The purpose of this letter is to ask 
you if reprints are available on any 
and all articles in vour publication 
and. if so. on what basis may we ob- 
tain them? 

Graham H. Moore, director of sales 

KSBW-TV & KVEC-TV 
Salinas. Calif. 

• krtielea of unusual interest arc reprinted. 
Tear sheets of mosl articles arc available \*iihoui 
rharsr. 

Index needed 

Could you help us? Is sponsor in- 
dexed anywhere? We badly need an 
article index to your \er\ useful pub- 
lication for our library. 
Mary Margaret Smith, librarian 
Brisacher, Wheeler Division 
Cunningham & Walsh. San Francisco 

• SPONSOR is Indexed sttmi emrnellj The 

listings appear in July and January i..ur<. Tear 
sheets of indlees are available. 




When sales are down . . . your slip is 

showing! You just forgot to sell South 

Texas with KONO Radio. Sell 'em up 

down South without a barrel of money . . . 

buy KONO Radio at the lowest cost per 

listener from your H-R or 

Clarke Brown man. 



860 kc 5000 walls 




SAN ANTONIO ,* RADIO 

NOW RATED 

FIRST 

in San Antonio's home 
county by N.C.S. No. 2 

. . . and rated FIRST by local 
advertisers year after year . . . 
for lowest-cost salesmanship 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



25 




3 SALIENT STEPS 








I TttpTouwi/ 



1. Market Power — NCS #2 reaffirms the size 
of this surging market . . . WBTV embraces 77 pop- 
ulous, prosperous counties . . . more than three- 
and-a-half million people controlling four-and-a- 
half billion dollars in effective buying income. 

2. Distribution Power — WBTV stands astride 
one of the two top distribution centers in the entire 
Southeast . . . wholesale volume exceeds a billion 
dollars annually. At almost the geographic center 
of the two Carolinas, Charlotte is the distribution 
capital of the richest area in the South. 

3. Sales Power — This is your great advantage. 
By using WBTV as your one basic unduplicated 
medium, you cover this vast market effectively with 
a low cost-per-thousand and superior sales results. 

Want striking success stories and assistance in 
blue-printing your own? Contact CBS Television 
Spot Sales. 



Jkfkkkwin Standard Broadcasting Compant; 



SPONSOR 




WHAT'S BEHIND 
DETROIT'S $100 MILLION AIR BUDGET? 



This week finds auto advertisers with more than 



$70 million pledged to network television alone 



f^ dramatic switch in the basic me- 
dia thinking of the nation's automobile 
manufacturers is underway. The air 
media, traditional!) considered supple- 
mentary, are toda\ emerging as De- 
troit's basic buy. 

I'his week, with Detroit- media 
shopping season not yet over, there is 
at least $72 million worth of network 
t\ business on the books for 1957-58 
b\ SPONSOR'S estimate — about 2.V , 
more than last season. The $100 mil- 
lion SPONSOR estimates Detroit will 
spend for all forms of air media nun 
surpass automotive expenditures in 



newspapers Detroit's biggesl medium 
in years past. (For a lisl of Detroit's 
net t\ buys to date, see SPI >NS< >R- 
SCOI'K. page 9.) 

Detroit i- apparently buying net- 
work tele\ i»i<'ii tiiM t" 1 arl\ 
.rack at the 1 boii esl availabilities, 
\nd it's buying network t\ like pack- 
aged goods companies with a new em- 
phasis on circulation, frequency and 
spreading the risk. You can take this 
as a straw in the wind, however, a- 
far as the other air media are con- 
cerned: This week Ford made the 
largest single network radio bin in 



-. plunking down *">."> million 
of < BS Radio 
shov - 

\\ hat's behind Detr< - the 

-n alrj the ans - more in 

the realm of automotive n 
than it does in air me. I - - ian- 
ship. Trends in the selling 
evolved i" the point where the 
strengths of the air media dovetail t.>- 
da\ w ith Detroit's 

F01 I '■ broil has lenl 

of sales - It has sw it< bed 

advertising emphasis from old-time 
nuts and bolts cop) t" the thrill of the 



SPONsoi; 



I \I \Y 1951 



27 



A lot of factors may have changed the Motor 
City's mind about tv, a medium it once regarded 
as "fine for selling soap — but not autos" 



ride and the sense of master) thai 
comes with a car responding to the 
slightest touch. It has found tv the 
effective \\a\ t<> dramatize such ap- 
peals; it can virtually give the viewer 
at home a demonstration ride. Detroit 
has also turned to styling cars for the 
feminine taste, and television has 
proved to be the medium that reaches 
more women than any other. 

All of the following have played a 
role in making 1957 the biggest auto- 
motive year in air media: 

Auto design: An increasing em- 
phasis is placed on stvle instead of 
consumer need. The passenger car in- 
dustry thrives on creating "obsoles- 
cence" through design rather than 
through motor wear. Its economy de- 
pends on car owners trading in every 
year or two regardless of how many 
thousand miles are left in their "old 
crates." There is little doubt that 
Chrysler Corp., which only a few sea- 
sons ago was in real trouble, has 
roared back through this year's ultra- 
modern styling. Smallest of the Big 
Three, it has scored the most striking 
gains in 1957. with first quarter sales 
of $1.1 billion, a high-water mark in 
its corporate history and a 55% gain 
over the same period a year ago. There 
also is little doubt that Chrysler's 
hea\y use of tv ( Lawrence Welk, Shoiv- 
er of Stars, Groucho Marx, etc.) 
played a major role in getting its styl- 
ing message through to the public. 

The American woman: Increasing 
emphasis on high-fashion advertising. 
This trend goes hand-in-hand with 
auto design, since much of the de- 
sign is aimed at the distaff side. In a 
speech he will make on 7 May to the 
Kansas Cit\ Women's Chamber of 
Commerce, George W. Walker, vice 
president and director of styling for 
Ford, will reveal the woman's influence 
on auto styling and sales. "Their de- 
cision is paramount in selection of a 
car's color," Walker told sponsor. 
Automotive colors often reflect trends 
in fashions and home decorating. The 
"jeweled" look of instrument panels 
are slanted at the ladies; power seats, 
power brakes and power steering are 
all adaptable to the "feminine touch." 



Even power windows have been de- 
signed so the woman operator won't 
damage her fingernail. 

Todav, woman's role in bu\ ing has 
changed to the point where it is com- 
mon practice for auto salesmen to take 
their own wives along on demonstra- 
tions. While the salesman talks to the 
prospect, his wife talks to the prospect's 
wife. Compare this technique with the 
auto television commercial of today 
and how effectively it uses the female 
personality — Lincoln-Mercury's Julia 



Meade. Chrysler's Mar\ Costa. Chevro- 
let's Dinah Shore. They are not the 
"Jayne Mansfield types"' with appeal 
for men only, but rather high-fashion 
"ladies' ladies." Women listen when 
the) talk. 

But women are not the sole key to 
car sales. "More and more, children 
are influencing automobile purchases," 
says Ernest Dichter, Ph.D., president 
of Institute for Motivational Research. 
"We have noticed, in the course of 
testing television commercials for J. 
Walter Thompson, the importance that 
children attach to vitality and drama in 
commercials for new autos. Ford's 
retractable hard top is a good example 
of this vitality and dramatic appeal. 
Children's reactions to this kind of 
thing move upward in the family hier- 



WHO'S WHO IN AUTOMOTIVE TV/RADIO BUYINi 



CAR BRAND 



Plymouth 



De Soto 



Dodge 



Dodge Trucks 



Chrysler 



Chevrolet 



Pontiac 



Bukk 



Oldsmobile 



Cadillac 



CMC Trucks 



■ Ford (cars 
and trucks) 



Mercury 



Lincoln 



Edsel 



Nash & Hudsoi 



Studebaker 
Packard 



COMPANY AD 



L. T. Hagopian 

dir. adv. & sain prom. 

6334 Lynch K 1 Detroit 3 



James L. Wichert 
dir. adv. & sales mgr. 
6000 Wyoming, Detroit 3 



A. C. Thomson adv. mgr 
Wendell D. (Pete) Moon 
dir. adv. & sales prom. 
7900 Joseph Campau Ave. 
Detroit 11 



W. D. Moore dir. adv.-mer 
A. C. Thomson adv. mgr. 
W. L. Kessinger asst. 
21500 Mound Rd.. 
Detroit 31 



Burton R. Durkee dir. ad 
& sales prom. & H. L 
Ault adv. mgr. 12,200 E 
Jefferson Ave., Detroit 



W. G. (Bill) Power 
GM Bldg., Detroit 2 



B. B. Kimball 
Pontiac 11, Mich. 



Paul Holt 

Hamilton Ave., Flint 2 

Mich. 



L. F. Carlson dir. of sdv 
Townsend St., Lansing 21 
Mich. 



W. T. LaRue merch. mgr, 
2860 Clark Ave., Detro 
32 



H. T. DeHart 

660 South Blvd.. East 

Pontiac, Mich. 



Henry M. Jackson v. p. & 

supv. Ford car 

W. G. Moore v. p. & supv. 

Ford truck 

3000 Schaefer Rd., Dear 

born, Mich. 



R. J. Fisher, adv. & sales 
prom. mgr. 3000 Schaefer 
Rd„ Dearborn, Mich. 



J. J. Seregny 

3000 Schaefer Rd.. 

Dearborn, Mich. 



E. E. Foi adv. mgr. 
3000 Schaefer Rd., Dear 
born, Mich. 



Fred W. Adams dir. ad 
& roerch., 14250 Plymouth 
Rd., Detxoit 32. E. B. Bro 
gan, adv. mgr. Rambler 
A. D. Gage adv. mgr 
Nash. Hudson & Met 
ropolitan 



S. A. Skillman gen. sal< 
mgr.. 635 So. Main, South 
Bend. Ind. 



■■ ■ 

AGENCY 



N. W. Ayer & Son 

4)00 I'm. . I.-. ..i Bldg. 
Detroit 26, Mich. 



BBOO 

1800 Penobscot Bldg., 
Detroit 



Crant Adv., Inc. 

2900 Guardian Bldg., 
Detroit 



Ross Roy, Inc. 

2751 E. Jefferson Ave., 
Detroit 7. Mich. 



McCann-Erickson 

3546 Penobscot Bldg., De 
troll. 



Campbell-Ewald Co 

CM Bldg., Detroit 



MacManus, John & 
Adams, Inc. 

Bloomfield Hills Mich. 



Kudner Agency, Inc. 

575 Madison Ave., 
New York City 



D. P. Brother & Co. 
CM Bldg., Detroit 



MacManus, John & 
Adams, Inc. 

Bloomfield Hills. Mich 



Kudner Agency, Inc. 

575 Madison Ave., New 
York City 



| Walter Thompson 

2130 Buhl Bldg.. Detroit 



Kenyon & Eckhardt 

1500 Penobscot Bldg., 
Detroit 



Young & Rubicam 

1600 Penobscot Bldg., 
Detroit 



Foote, Cone & 
Belding 

1060 National Bank Bldg 
Detroit 



Ceyer Adv., Inc. 

14250 Plvmouth Rd., 
Del roil 



Benton & Bowles 
444 Madison Ave, New 

York Chv 



ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 



w'm. T. Lowe supv. ser. 
warren Abrams radio & I' 
-erv. rep., Detroit 



R. E. Anderson gen. mgr. 
John McKee acct. supv. 



M. B. Calher a.e. 
W. A. Hammond 
media dir. 



W. H. Cerstenberger v.p 
& acct. supv. 
Robt. C. Lyon a.e. 



F. W. Ovcresch.. v.p. & 
acct. group head 
Robt. M. Ellis a.e. 



Colin Campbell -r. v.p. & 
gen. a.e., Philip L. Mc- 
Hugh v.p. radio & tv 



Hovey Hagerman sr. v.p. 



Neve Richards 



Sheldon Moyer v p. & 

ass't. mgr. 

\ . L. Corradi. a.e. 



Chas. F. Adams v.p. 



J. w. Millard 



Donaldson B. Thorburn 
v.p. & supv. radio & tv 



D. J. Cillespie. v.p. ( acct. 
-upv . Richard T. O'Riley 
v.p. & sr. a.e. W. C. Mar- 
tin vp. & a.e. 



A. P. Butler v.p. & acct. 
sup*.. H. E. Beard a.e.. 
J R. Bracken. Jr. a.e.. 
T. R Mavnard. Jr. it. 



Bruce Miller 
Albert Remington 



J. F. Henry v.p. & a.e. 
E. J. Rogers a-M. a.e. 



TIMEBUVER 



I New York I Helen Hart- 
wig & Richard Biinbury 



L. \veinrich media Mipv 
W. B. Cruuse 



James A. Brown 



Carl E. Ha-sel v p. I 
media dir 



Kelso Taeger media dir. 
w m. J. Davis ass't. 
media dir. 



Carl Georgi v.p. & media 
dir. 



( ha-. N. Campbell 
media dir. 



John Mar-ich. Ann Gardi- 
ner. Marge Scanlon 



Uatts U acker media dir. 
Jack waUh 



Elmer H . Frorhlich 
v.p. dir. of media 



John Marsich. Ann 
Gardiner 



Ralph Bachman media dir. 
i Detroit 1. Tom Glynn. 
Dorolhv Thornton > \e 
York l 



Brendan Baldwin media 
-up. i\r» York I. Don C 

Miller sr. v.p.. I. Ken 

nedv 



C. V Nnon 
R. C Holbrook 



Robt. Hussey. media dir. 
Genevieve Lemper cnief 
limebuver (Chicago) 



J. R. Ti-livk) Detroit 
media dir. 



Janir^ Black accl. supv 
Frank Slephan a.e. 



Richard McCo<*y 



SOURCE: Tills di 



lied for 8PONBOB by William II. CartHTight. manager of Edward Petry &■ 






Copy switch from nuts 'n* bolts to style fits tv e 



ra 



Tin- old emphasis on mechanii >l supei i 
orit) i- refhx i ■! in the \\ illys Knighl ad, 
uppei t mlii. I oda) 's can feature d( sign 
.1- i'< idenci il I ■ % (lux sler i oi p's fabi ii 
photo ii i ight, l'\ the high-fashion shot oi 
.1 Men urj below . and 1 > v the t lldsmobile 
picture with plenty oi woman-appeal al 
Iowa i ight. I \ • ommen ials feature such 
personalities as Julia Meade and Marj 
• oata i" emphasize the new slant al 
Hoiin ii as .i purchasing powei jusl as i ai 
salesmen todaj take theii wives along on 
demonstration rides to spui their Bales 





WlLLYft-KNICHI S/ \ 



' 




arch) and have a direct influence on 
buying decisions, especiallv when par- 
ents have no strong brand preference. 
"While women and children must In- 
recognized as important factor-."" Dr. 
Dichter continued, "advertisers tnusl 
not overlook the fact that tin- man in 
the famil) seek- satisfactions for him- 
BeH in an increasingly frustrating 
world over which he has little control. 
He derives satisfaction not onl) from 
the power of his car but also from its 
responsiveness. The Feeling that this 
instrument does, after all. re-pond in- 
stantl) to his touch uives him a sense 
of master)."' I Most ride demonstra- 
tion via t\ commercials certain!) con- 
vex this mastery-of-motion feeling.) 
" I he successful appeal to the car buyer 
will use all these famil) needs, weaving 
them into a commercial which will act 
effectivel) for mother, father, chil- 
dren. ' \\ ith close to '20 programing 
hours a week slated for t\ next fall. 
auto manufacturers will have a chance 
to do just that. 

Prestige: Cars are social climbers, 
too. Ever) auto compan) is trying to 

push its own make a little higher up in 



Motordom - social register. \\ hen su< - 
cessful, it i- reflected in greatei public 
acceptance and increased sales. There 
have been cases ol auto- width have 
been on the market for years, which 
are median icall) excellent, hut which 
ha\e never made the grade in public 
prestige. Sponsorship of a good t\ 
show and it- identit) with the sponsoi 
has been found effective in building 
this feeling of prestig 

"" Automobile advertising seems to 
reap particular benefits from program 
association, says Leonard Kudisch, 
executive vice president of Schwerin 
Research Corp. "lor example, com- 
mercials for one make had no effec- 
tiveness gain when tested in a partici- 
pating -how. bul gol seven percent of 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Current buying at auto companies and 
agencies indicates a S 1 00 million year 
for air media, its biggest ever. This 
fall, night net tv will find cars ad- 
vertised practically across the board. 
A change in Detroit thinking is respon- 
sible for tv becoming a basic medium. 



the audience to switch to the I 
when tested on im whii h the 

advertise! had been sponsorii 
long time. Uong with this, 
brani e of i "pv points m is than 

tw ii .■ as high on the - 

Schwerin Resea - ' • it i\ «- 

\l- isure i- a test in which v i< 
i ho k. before and afti 

■■ ial. which make produi t t) 
like to win. and the change in i h 
i- noted. I "i autos, the "hVr i- a sub- 
stantial toward the i - 
deal the winner can mak< 

In general, Schwerin R< » in h found 
in summing up all te-t- in the 
thai 54 r < m| i ar commen ial- i 
tic ant it 
le changing t-> the advert 

brand. "I hat i- below the overall 

for conii 'i all field-."' 

Kudisch admit-. "It i- 
for example. t.> swa) women's '■ 

es in tl • autv product fit ; ' 
hut it nevertheless shows that a lot "f 
automobile commen ials are prodn 
suits." 



New marketing knowledge: 
I Please turn to /«/_• 77 



In- 



SPONSOR 



4 xtAY 1957 



29 




■I 



m mmmmw 



>0»|. 




:h,Jid Milner Proilurt-' -uccess is the know-how of Howard S. Cohoon. 1.. president and Gordon Best Advertising Agency. Shown exam- 
ining sales promotion material with Cohoon are Frank F. Morr, agency v.p., and account executive and Gordon Best, r., agency president 



THE FABULOUS RISE OF MILN! 

Sales of a pine oil cleanser and, later, a synthetic starch 
went up 90-fold in nine years. The prime media: tv and radio 



C«very once in a while some little- 
known company or product rockets 
across the advertising firmament leav- 
ing a fiery trail of record-breaking 
sales in its wake. 

The sight of this blazing success is 
usually like a shot of Benzadrine to 
admen, who, after shaking off the ef- 
fects of after-lunch Martinis and hum- 
blj repledging their faith in advertis- 
ing, will eagerly ask: Who (or what) 
did it? 

( )ne of these rocketing successes is the 
Milner Products Co. of Jackson, Miss., 
makers of Pine-Sol and Perma Starch. 
During its nine-year slam-bang history, 



30 



Milner increased its sales from a start- 
ing point of $77,000 to what is pre- 
dicted to be (and what will likely be) 
$7 million in 1957. To those interested 
in mathematics, that's a 90- fold jump 
or a 9,000' , increase, depending on 
how you like to figure these things. It's 
also about 40' { above 1956. 

Who (or what) did it? Tv, radio 
and Howard Cohoon — though not nec- 
essarily in that order. 

Cohoon is the president of Milner 
Products. He took over tbe reins of the 
company after a rising land still ris- 
ing) young southern industrialist by 
the name of R. E. Dumas Milner 



bought it in 1948 and today, obviously, 
is damn glad he did. At the time Mil- 
ner bought it, the firm went under the 
name of Magnolia Chemical Co. and 
was a local janitorial supply house 
selling a pine-oil disinfectant. 

Cohoon, with the aid of Gordon Best 
Advertising, took this janitor's disin- 
fectant, turned it into a grocery prod- 
uct, named it Pine-Sol. advertised it 
aggressively and punched through to 
national distribution in about five \ ears. 

Though Cohoon and the agency 
started off with newspaper advertising, 
the air media quickly showed a su- 
perior sales-influencing ability. Con- 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



Il 



Bidering the nature of the product 

i combination household cleanse] . 
disinfectant and deodorant it i not 
surprising. The air media nave shown 
time and again their effectiveness in 
selling this and similar type products, 
notabl) soap. 

Cohoon feels the explanation for air 
media's superioritj and he's got con- 
sumer research studies to hack it up 
i~ .1- follows: "While l><>th Pine-Sol and 
Perma Starch provide benefits ti> the 
ii^i-r. when either one is used the home- 
maker is not not dressed at her best. 
She is not entertained, she i- not beau- 
tified. In brief, Pine-Sol and Perma 
Starch are not glamorous products. 

"Since this is so we cannot expe< I 
there will be much, if any, innate de- 
sire on the part ol women t<> expend 
the effort t<> reali 1 ) read and find out 
about »ur product. So they are natu- 
rals for advertising l>\ the spoken word 

the forte of radio and t\. Resides, 

we gel the added advantage <>f the en- 
thusiasm, the salesmanship and the 
persuasiveness of a g 1 salesman." 

I5ut the clincher is thi>: " \t least 
for our products we have found thai 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Milncr Products will spend $1.25 mil 
lion on advertising during this year, 
90°o in spot tv, spot and network 
radio. The know-how and aggressive 
advertising made a pine oil cleanser 
and a synthetic starch the leaders 
in their respective fields of endeavor. 

pel sonalized Belling a< i omplishes the 
desired result." 
This \eai Milnei will Bpend 90' I ol 

it- ad budget On BpOl t\ and -pot and 

network radio. This budget will total 
about 1 1 .25 million, up in mi K 50' I 
from last year, with an additional 
(250,000 for sales promotion. Tin- 
share ol advertising to estimated Bales 
is thus about I!!' , . Interestingly 
enough, this is identical to the share 
reported for soaps, polishes and de- 
tergents this J car in a -in \ e\ made b) 
the W \ in January. While Pine-Sol 
and Perma Starch do not quite fit into 
the soap-polish-detergenl category, the 
two Milncr products are probabl) 

closest to il than an\ othei , 

The hea\ \ ratio of ad monies to aii 



ntl) well al 
budget. In l'>>V iIh • 
m I" 

the two in me i 
ceived the lit • until I i 

\\ iih the pin 'i in 

. there -u ■ t . h i 

• in-.- ol the i" ed to den 
produi i and its pn 
Starch ii parativel) 1 1 

thetic and one stan hing, the label tells 
housewives, will last ihn i t>> 

1 5 washings. 

So last yeai Milner plunked ~>2' < of 
it- ad dollars on t\ at 
lli i — \ eai the figures 
I he -hair f"i radio, however, h 
' "I n - real res the medium. 

lie explain-: 

"I \ en though Pine-Sol doe- not 

benefit as mu< h fi t isu il sell • 

i .in-.- the produi i does not lend itself 
as well t" demonstration, it 

omical for our him to bu) t\ for 
two pi oducts than one. I hi- i- 
of the t\ package announcement ; 



IIODUCTS 




Television: Milner uses minutes within web 
t\ -how ~ not sold nationally in -mailer mar- 
ket-. Shows bought into include "NBC Mati- 
nee:" (IBS T\ '- "Ilon-epartv." I shown above) 



Radio: Winner of Milner's household hints 
contest sews button on Robert Q. Lewis' 

jacket. Lewi-" CBS Radio -how and \B< 
Radio's "Breakfast Club" help promote the 
contest. Milner buys Eve minute- of each 




Milncr spends 90% of its $1.25 million ad 
budget on spot tv plus spot and network radio 



commonl) available. B\ and large, the 
discount for a maximum announce- 
ment package is twice the discount of 
the minimum package so that it be- 
comes pure economics to buy tv for 
both products. Were it not for this 
fact, we undoubtedK would be using 
more of our Pine-Sol budget on radio."' 

Another economic argument here, 
Cohoon says, is that Milner is able to 
use tv during its cheapest time periods 
— meaning daytime, of course, since 
the firm seeks a female audience. 

Milner's economical tiinebuying has 



Principal owner of Milner Products is R. E. 
Duma- Milner. young Southern industrialist, 
who bought firm in 1948 for $48,000. Milner 
i- the largest General Motors dealer in the 
U. S., owns two hotels, a radio station, is 
constructing office buildings, a shopping center 




collared the firm an average tv cost- 
per-1,000 of 58c. On radio, the aver- 
age has been running about 95c. 

Tv schedules average about 000 an- 
nouncements per week on 59 stations 
in 56 markets. This gives the two prod- 
ucts about 23 million gross impressions 
per week. Milner uses minutes where 
it can. but also 20-seconds and I.D.'s. 

In his search for minutes. Cohoon. 
who spends about half his time on the 
road and handles a considerable 
amount of the timebuying chores him- 
self, has corralled a number of the 
longer announcements within daytime 
tv network shows. This is particularly 
true on smaller stations, many of whom 
are fed network shows on a sustaining 
basis and sell the time locally. Among 
these spot-in-network buys are minutes 
in the Arthur Godfrey, Art Linkletter. 
Garrv Moore and Bob Crosby shows 
on CBS TV and Queen for a Day and 
NBC Matinee on NBC TV. 

Carrying the brunt of radio adver- 
tising are five minute segments on the 
Robert Q. Lewis show on CBS Radio 
Saturday mornings and Breakfast Club 
on ABC Radio Monday mornings. 
Spot radio is used in four markets 
where Milner isn't using tv both be- 
cause it provides a continuing yard- 
stick of radio efficiency and because 
the stations' personalities have some- 
thing extra on the ball. Also used is 
WJQS. Jackson, Miss., which has been 
bought for an exceptionally good rea- 
son: Milner himself owns it. 

The web radio shows are the adver- 
tising spearhead of an intriguing and 
successful sales promotion operation. 
This is the Mrs. Homemaker's Forum 
contest, which is promoted only on 
radio. To quote a publicity release 
about the Forum: "This organization, 
sponsored by Milner Products, invites, 
collates and disseminates household 
hints to ease the work load of home- 
makers the nation over and rewards 
enterprising housewives for sending in 
their practical household hints with 
cash prizes and Florida vacations." 

But that's only part of it. The hint- 
are collected in a column and syndi- 
cated in about 4,000 newspapers. Spe- 
cial columns are also supplied to re- 
tailers who use them in ads and an 
encyclopedia of these hints has been 
published. The hints collected are not 



onl) aboul Pine-Sol and Penna Starch, 
it should be pointed out. but each col- 
umn has one item about the Milner 
brands tucked awa\ unobtrusively. 

Last year the Forum received 750.- 
000 hints plus a Pine-Sol or Perma 
Starch label during contest time, which 
is the first three months of the year. 
This year the total is expected to be 
well over a million. Each week during 
the contest nine winners receive $5. At 
the end of the contest. 40 housewives 
and their husbands are awarded Flor- 
ida vacations. This year, for the first 
time, four retailers, four salesmen for 
brokers and one broker were also given 
Florida vacations for the best mer- 
chandising support. 

One of the most interesting aspects 
of the Forum, which has been in exist- 
ence for three \ears. is that the sending 
of hints started out as a. spontaneous 
affair and turned into a contest later. 

There is little else in the Milner 
story that is spontaneous, however. It 
is a story about people who knew their 
business but were also willing to take 
a chance. The measure of that know- 
how is the fact that Pine-Sol and 
Perma Starch are the only nationally- 
distributed brands of their type and 
are far and away the sales leaders in 
their respective fields. It is notable 
that Perma Starch did not get off the 
ground until Cohoon took it over. And 
it is also notable that before Dumas 
Milner took over that small Jackson. 
Miss., chemical firm for $48,000, pine 
oil interests in Mississippi, which is 
the biggest producing area of pine oil, 
had tried to interest P&G, Colgate and 
Lever Bros, in marketing a pine oil 
product without success. At present 
Milner Products is the biggest user of 
the stuff in the world. 

As a matter of fact, when Dumas 
Milner first took over Magnolia Chemi- 
cal he wasn't sure how pine oil could 
be marketed though, to be sure, this 
canny, young industrialist I he was 
onl) 31 at the time) had some inkling 
of its potential. When Cohoon was 
persuaded to come in as general man- 
ager, he wasn't sure, either, how to sell 
it. Cohoon s considerable experience in 
the soap business provided him a\ it h 
ideas on how to find out and he trav- 
eled around the South for a while 
talking to retailers and brokers. The 
end result was the decision to make 
a household cleanser out of an institu- 
tional disinfectant and fight to get shelf 
space next to other cleansers. ^ 




H 

One highlight "I heavily-attended lA'a sessions was address bj Professoi Frey, who's conducting \N V- 



SPONSOR asked at the 4A's meeting 



WHY DON'T YOU BUY MORE SPOT? 

Marketing strategy, not cost of lian<lliii<; *|>ot. dictates amounl 

recommended to client, saj beads <>1 ad agencies questioned 



_^ w ill II SI I rill It SPRINGS, W. VA. 
\^nul(l spot t\ and radio gel a larger 
(hunk of the advertising dollar? I? 
spot more expensive to handle than 
other media? Doc- this mitigate 
against spot? 

I.a-t week, in the premature heal 
of White Sulphur Springs, SPONSOR 
put these questions to agencj man- 
agement while 600 members of the 
! \ s were gathered at The Greenbriei 
for their annual idea exchange. 

For a three-da) respite, at least. 
competition between agencies w,i« 
relegated to golf links and bridge 
tournaments and in this relaxed at- 
mosphere management executives of 
agencies ranging from under $] mil- 
lion in billing to well over $200 mil- 
lion concerned themselves with prob- 
lems common to all. 

One such problem, although not 
actual!) on the agenda, is the relative 
profitability of the various media. It's 



a subject that ma) come under < losei 
scrutin) within the next yeai as the" 
findings of the W \ *s stud) ol agenc) 
sei \ ices begin t" ernei ge 

In his 27 \pi il address t" the I \ - 
Professor Vlberl Frey, who's conduct- 
ing the \\ \ study, said that the hx us 
of his -in \ c\ w ill be upon the i • 
of agenc) services. Agencies, who feel 
the) must justify their 15*/J commis- 
sion, are studying more closel) than 
r' ei before their cost ol i >pei ation as 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Spurred by ANA study of agency ser- 
vices, members of 4A s are studying 
agency cost of operating, including 
cost of handling different media. Most 
find tv programing department a bigger 
cost factor than spot buying, feel 
client needs dictate media decisions. 



well as the cost ol the) fur' 

II. .w do Bpot t\ and 
Up under this SCTUtin) ? \nd what 

effect, if an) . does this 1 

fling ha\e upon the dolla 
into thes< 

sponso mred thes 

vi ith heads of a broad < i - n of 

B from - 
headquartered in W » J 

W alter I hompson. BB1 K ' I 

to outside-New i 

ild Advertising in \ 
Tatham-Laird in Ch 
com & San Francis 

Lindse) v\ Co. in Ri< hmond, 
Idler. Neal and Battle in Atlanta. Curl 
I Denvei Set 'iam. 

Louis v\ Brorb) . Chi< 

I he-' - lie of the concl - 

emerging from sponsor's sun 

• I \.-r\ one "f tl nen inter- 



SPONSOR 



1 \m 1951 



33 



Cost of handling media varies with type of client, 
size of agency, methods of buying, say agency heads 



viewed pointed to an increased share 
of the agent) s hilling in spot during 
L956 compared with 1955 and pre- 
dicted further growth during this year. 

• Most agencies do cost-accounting 
l>\ clients rather than by media. In 
that manner, they feel, they achieve a 
better balance of service for each 
client without being prejudicial in 
terms of the cost of handling different 
media. 

• In most agencies as much as a 
25', fluctuation in spot billing one 
way or the other would not affect the 
agency's overhead in terms of per- 
sonnel on staff to handle spot. 

• The relative profitability of han- 
dling spot tv and radio varies widely 
depending upon the size and geo- 
graphic extent of a campaign. Thus 
a long-term saturation spot campaign 
may be cheaper for the agency to 
handle than a one-shot network buy. 

• The expense of handling spot, in 
giant air agencies particularly, is often 
less than the high cost of maintaining 
a fully staffed programing department 
for network buys. 

• Criteria totally unrelated to profit- 
ability for the agency and stemming 
rather from the nature of the spot 
media usually dictate agency media 
recommendations to clients. 

According to top agencymen, the ra- 
dio and tv stations themselves as well 
as their reps hold the trump card on 
making spot a more appealing buy. 
It's up to them to cut through the 



paperwork maze which adds to agenc) 
overhead in placing spot campaigns, 
and more important, to make spot 
more competitive with network aud 
thus a better buy for clients. 

Here's how top agency executives 
analyze their handling of the spot 
media today : 

► Can spot become a better buy? 
"Spot isn't the perfect medium for 
every client or every advertising objec- 
tive," said Bryan Houston, chairman 
of the board of Bryan Houston. "Fre- 
quently availabilities are tight. Sta- 
tions tend to jam in too many com- 
mercials in top-rated time. So you 
end up with a choice of squeezing in 
20"s or 10's among a batch of other 
commercials or moving into second- 
rate time periods." 

Another major factor to mitigate 
against greater use of spot is the 
number of new network segmentation 
plans vying for sponsor dollars. 

"No network can take the place of 
a good popular local personality in 
persuasiveness," says Houston. "But 
once such a personality becomes suc- 
cessful, he sometimes allows his show 
to be overloaded with commercials. 
On that score and in terms of product 
exclusivity the networks give better 
protection." 

Two top executives from Southern 
agencies, discussing their spot tv strat- 
egy during an afternoon respite, pointed 
out that the continued growth of tv has 
made the handling of spot less costly 



than in the early days of the medium. 

"We've been using tv for our clients 
since 1948, and today spot accounts 
for about one-third of our total bill- 
ing," Dan W. Lindsey, Jr., president 
of Lindsey & Co., Richmond, Va., told 
sponsor. "But until about a year ago. 
spot tv was very unprofitable for the 
agency because of the high cost of 
production. As tv accounts have 
grown, the medium became profitable 
for us." 

"As you use more markets you can 
amortize the cost of film and produc- 
tion." said William W. Neal, partner 
of Liller. Neal & Battle, Atlanta. 

"The only trouble is that local tv 
stations are programing more and 
more film, and don't maintain full-time 
live crews. So you have to pay any- 
where from $5 to $75 extra if \ou 
want to have a crew there for live 
commercials." 

The Lindsey agency's largest spot 
advertiser, the James G. Gill Co.. a 
regional coffee brand, uses syndicated 
half-hour shows. Says Lindsey. "Today 
you don't have to go to film to insure 
good commercials. Local tv stations 
are doing an increasingly good job 
with their live announcers and their 
technical crews. And stations and 
media reps both are doing a better job 
these days of selling against print." 

► Hon: costly is spot for the agency? 
That is probably one of the toughest 
questions for an agency to determine 
with any accuracy. Mel Brorbv, presi- 
dent of Louis. Needham & Brorbv and 
current chairman of the 4A's, made 
such a survey a couple of years ago 
but finds that these figures are con- 
stantlv changing ones. Furthermore. 



Mel Brorbv, senior v.p. of Needham, Louis 
& Brorby. Chicago, newly elected chairman 
of 4A's, did media cost-accounting study 




Dave Danforth • 1>. BBDO exec. v.p. and v.p. of 4A's, urged the 400 4A's members attend- 
ing convention to cooperate with ANA survey on agency services and compensation being con- 
ducted by Prof. Albert Frey, professor of advertising and marketing at Dartmouth University 




iii different agencies the i i r i » -~- <>l 
demarcation between spot and network 
\. iiliin the media department varj . 

•|m our shop the same buyers handle 
spot and network, depending "ii t !»<■ 
client," Dave Danforth, executive v.p. 
,,i' BBDO, told sponsor between Sat- 
urday morning sessions .ii the l\> 
convention. '"It would be difficult to 
determine ( 1 « > w much it costs the 
agenc) in terms of man-hours. \ tar 
greatei cost-determining factor is the 

distribution of the client's | lucl and 

the number of markets the media 
department lias to consider for a par- 
ticular spot campaign. \t anj rate, I 
know that the percentage ol spot we ve 
been using has been increasing in rela- 
tion to over-all billing and that goes 
for radio in the |>a-t year as well. 1 

Norman Strouse, president of J. 
Walter Thompson, and one of the 
speakers at the convention, feels that 
the s|)ol media have dune a good job 

of making spot easier to buy. "Of 

course, each medium dictates a certain 
amount of overhead. For instance, we 

have special held men. producers, 

under Norm \arne\. who travel to 
local markets to supervise our clients 
spot activity." This overhead is justi- 
fied and amortized through the targe 
proportion of JWT spot hilling. 

Just as media organization varies 
from agenc\ to agencv. so does the 
COSt of handling individual media. In 
the case of San Francisco's Guild. Bas- 
com & Bonfigli it's network relations 
that dictated the recent addition of a 
top-level media executive, Reggie 
Schuebel, as head of the New York ex- 
tension of agency's media department. 

"Our main reason for this step was 
for closer network contact in New 
York, where network bins open up." 

Bays Walter Guild, chairman of the 
hoard of GB&B. 

Bart Cummings, president of Comp- 
ton, whose agenc) employs 640 people 
to handle over $70 million in hillings. 
- - continued growth of agenc) over- 
head apart from the handling of spot 
t\ and radio as agencies sen ice more 
and more of their clients" needs. '"Our 
marketing department, for instance, 
includes 16 men this year," (about 
four more than last \ear at this time). 

"W e don't charge clients for this 
service, at the same time we continue 
to make greater demands on our media 
men. For instance, each huver sends a 
report on his spot schedules to Frank 
Kemp i. media director I and to the 
account executive each month. And if 




SPONSOR interviewed lA'a memben I wiont "I 

HOW AGENCY HEADS LOOK AT SPOT 

Agencies have noted an increased share of total billing in spot 
^ in 1956 compared with L955, and anticipate that spot's 
ma\ rise furthei this year. Buying hinges on availabilitii 

well as client need, since u'" M | time periods are -till jammed. 



Cost of handling spot does not altei in direct proportion with 
spot hilling. Certain overhead and man-hours of work remain 
fixed throughout 2.V, fluctuations in Bpol buyii I ;e billing 
in saturation spread in man) markets eventual!) amortizes cost 



Size and extent of campaign affects cost ol placing it. Ihu- 
saturation buying foi long-term commitments can be ch< 
for agenc) to handle than single t\ bu) on one-shot 
Program department i- biggest overhead in large ail 



Wiser sales strateg) on part of local stations could i 

more competitive with network. - ■ v men. I hev recom- 

mend bettei product protection, more competitive pricing, better 
availabilities choice, bettei service from station 






we see no changes in this schedule, we 

BO hack and ask him why. The medium 

requires constant reviewing and im- 
proving of schedules, and that - the 

agencv 's job. 

\t the Tvl! cocktail part) toward 
the end of the I V- convention, 
Epstein, v.p. and treasurer, and 
Killeen, president of Fitzgerald Vgenc) 
in New Oilcan-, discussed I ost ai - 
counting hv media. 

"1 don't reallv believe that tin- could 
be done accurately," Epstein told 

SPONSOR. "But even if it could, I'm 

not sure it would he wise. Just sup- 
pose, for the saki of argument, that 
we found out that radio was more 
expensive for the agencv to handle 
than some other media, for in- 



stant if I tried tO keep this 

information confidential, it would 
likelv to seep tl ind it would 

ssai ilv prejudice our media n • 
mmendations. This woul 
an agent v '- primar) aim of it 
effective and 

This agent j . too, has m in- 

proportion of its • si 
v IJ million billings go into spot i 
and tv in the past two. 

"'I think people tend to forget that 
the greatest sing c) overht 

since the advent of tv i- the t\ pro- 
department," \rt Iatham. 
president of Tatham-Laini, whose 
• v bills in excess of v 2" million. 
told SPONSOR. "I think this more than 
balances the i osl of handling spot ^ 



SPONSOR 



4 may 195" 






It's not the product that offends viewers, says 

Raymond K. Maneval of Schwerin Research, 
but rather the manner in which you present it 



IS YOUR 

< 

PRODUCT 

TABOO 
FOR TV? 



uJ " \<>u feel your product is too per- 
sonal to be discussed in the family liv- 
ing room? 

Not too many years ago manufac- 
turers of deodorants, toilet tissues, 
beer and the radio networks felt the 
same way. Hut our experience at 
Schwerin in testing the public's reac- 
tion to "taboo"' products was that of- 
fending an audience depends more on 
the manner of presentation than on the 
product itself. 

Today television clients are still feel- 
ing their way along where personal 
and sensitive products are concerned. 
Many have learned to use the medium 
effectively and without offense. Others 
may still be standing on the threshold 
wondering whether they can sell brands 
and yet not shock the audience. 

Some recent results of Schwerin 
tests should help orient you if yours is 
a ticklish product to talk about. And 
there may be a moral or two here for 
the advertiser no matter what his prod- 
uct. This is what we found in testing 
tv commercials for three brands of 
toilet tissue. 

• Only 4' ! of the audience felt that 
this product should not be advertised 
on tv no matter what the presentation. 

• A mood approach (associating the 
product with certain ideas, softness, 
gentleness, a baby's skin) was inoffen- 
sive to a great majority of the viewers. 

• A straight sell on audio stressing 
specific product features caused 21 '< 
of the audience to think the commer- 
cial was in bad taste. 

• A radio commercial for another 
toilet tissue was found in bad taste by 
2.V , of the audience because both a 
man and a woman discussed the quali- 
ties of the tissue. 

The results of these tests (shown in 
the chart at right I indicate a good rule 
ol thumb when dealing with "sensi- 
tive"' products: When in doubt use 
mood rather than logic. The logical 
sell, unless care is taken, has a ten- 
dency to draw attention to the features 
of the product that made it "sensitive" 
in the first place. 

The taboo against commercials for 
women s underwear has been success- 



fully and tastefully breached on both 
t\ and radio. Bra and girdle commer- 
cials that present fullv clothed models 
presumably wearing the garments have 
received very high good taste scores. 
The problem of demonstrating the 
garment in action on tv was solved 
simpl) bj eliminating the model, a la 
Topper, so that the girdle or bra is 
worn b\ an invisible ectoplasmic 
woman. 

\ pretest of tv commercials for two 
undergarment manufacturers revealed 
that 21' i found an early approach to 
the demonstration problem in bad 
taste. Onlv ~' '< found the commercial 
offensive when the "Topper"" approach 
was used l achieved by photographing 
the garment on a model eompletelv 
clothed in a tightfitting black outfit 
against a black background). 

In this case presenting the finished 
product ( what the undergarment does 
for the appearance I and showing the 
garment alone in action left a bit for 
the imagination. Rather than demon- 
strating the product graphically and 
perhaps offensively — it was a success- 
ful selling technique. 

An advertiser for one of the presum- 
ably "sensitive" products — deodorant 
soap — jumped in where angels fear to 
tread. He made the point that his 
product gives the user a clean re- 
freshed feeling by showing a lithe 
young ladv in a bathtub scene that 
would have done justice to He Mille 
depicting revelry in pagan Rome. The 
taste score on this commercial was 
quite good: onh 69? of the women 
respondents thought the commercial in 
bad taste. Surprising however was the 
male reaction — twice as manv of the 
men objected! 

The twist which forcibly makes the 
point that it is the manner of presenta- 
tion which offends your audience is 
provided In two commercials for a 
eompletelv innocuous product — a 
beautv preparation. In the first com- 
mercial, on extremelj sultry model, 
reclining on the floor delivers the sales 
message. Her voice outdoes Mae West 
at her most eloquentlv suggestive. By 



Schwerin test audience isn't squeamish about most commercials (.see chart) 



SPONSOR 



4 -vm 1957 



Percent of audience offended varied with theme in commercials tested 

TOILET TISSUE UNDERGARMENTS 




Tv baby story: this approach get a 
in I. Product soft .1- baby's -kin 



Brand C 




21% 



Tv straight sell: product quali- 
tir- were stressed; strength, softness 




Tv bridal story: also mood, theme 
i- soft .1- .i bride's satin wedding gown 



Brand D 




25% 



Radio straight sell: - '" --■ d prod- 
act qualities. Man ind woman speak 




Tv straight sell: 

Nil 1: 



Commercial B 







21% 



Tv straight sell: 
act fi 



tin- second commercial, the same over- 
heated model has gotten as far as the 
couch. Still reclining she delivers the 
cop) while fending <>fT the advances of 
an equal!) damp male. 

Vudience reaction was dramatic: 
87' < of those questioned tall women 
ami perhaps less prudish than men I 
thought the second commercial u;i- 
"too sexj to be shown in the home." 
The first commercial was considered 
"too sensual and in bad taste" bj <'!i>'< 
of those questioned. \nd yet this prod- 
act is one a girl scout ran bu) without 
a blush! 

Networks and advertisers have come 
along wa\ since the delicate period 
of the L930's and earl) 1940's. Then, 
in their de-ire to be discreet, the radio- 
men bent over backwards in refusing 
air time to "questionable" products. 

We found evidence of this bending- 
over-backwardness in 1°U'> when we 
wen- asked to test an underarm de- 
odorant commercial used on a popular 
radio program. OnK 7'< of the polled 
audience thought this "discreet" de- 
odorant commercial in had taste. Two 



vears later in a test run on a beet tele- 
vision commercial, exactlv the -ante 
response was achie^ ed: onlj 7' . ob- 
jected, i The majoi il\ "I this gTOUp 

objected to the sale and use of 
and so were ne\ er potential custon 

It was "1>\ ious from this that net- 
work and sponsor caution rather than 
public opinion had branded i ertain 
products .i- somehow "offensive in 
themseh es. I hinking w as rei ised ac- 
cording!) and the emphasis placed on 
the specific commercial and whether 
it- presentation was or wasn't in good 
taste. 

Schwerin's testing in this field leads 
to these conclusions aboul good and 
had taste in t\ and radio: ! Pec 
attitudes aboul what i- suitable for 



AUTHOR: i; lymond K. 
• i«-n t 
R .irrh. 
i the widi 
ithered bj SR< 
in thf- tr-tin:: • ■)' \ari>-.l 
t\ and rjilin commi 




advertisii ttremel) liberal; 

lapses from _• I tasti 

< >tT~j > i i n ur "I .i specific element in the 

offending 

iel\ on mood than on l"_i. ii 

iiiL: a "deli' ate" product : 

product ■ on 

cause) the) must tread lightly, ar<- not 

the priraar) offenders of \i<-w 

bilities; and e the question of 

tastefulrtess lies in the proi 

emotion] it i- not eas) t'- - 

situation thai will rul> t- 
people the w i 

|| is a from our t- - 

"sensitive" produi ts have been ' 
fulh ted on television, and thai 

not prevent brand seD 
tive demonstration. rtion 

tste exists as mon iblem in 

other areas. In commercials that 
di.w n the i ompetition and tbi 

imen ial that elicit- the 
damning audience remark. "This • 
menial was an in-ult to my intelli- 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 






TV'S HOTTEST BATTLEGROUND 

Daytime, scene of intense CBS-NBC competition, may see upsurge 

in fall sets-in-use as ABC readies aggressive programing-sales strategy 



I he most significant development in 
the fall network television picture may 
turn out to be the maturing of an al- 
most-stepchild — daytime tv. The big 
battleground, in fact, for next season 
is daytime. It is now in the focus 
of intense concentration by all three 
networks and of reawakened interest 
among advertisers — some of them en- 
tirely foreign to the davtime scene. 

These are some of the signs of fer- 
ment : 

• Clients and agencies are matching 
the interest of the networks with their 
own reevaluation of daytime. Auto- 
motives and cigarettes, never heavy 
regular davtime clients, are eyeing the 
housewife audience as marketing strat- 
egy swings to recognition of women 



as prime sales targets for products once 
thought of as male-oriented. (See arti- 
cle page 27 this issue for some of 
the factors underlying the shift of the 
automotives to the air media, including 
the major role of women in automobile 
choice today. I 

• Red hot competition from NBC. 
following its extensive revamp of day- 
time programing, has CBS TV busy 
moving to counter. One step: the hir- 
ing for the first time in recent network 
history of an outside firm to do ex- 
ploitation ( Brandt Associates ) . 

• Into this already hot competitive 
situation steps ABC TV next fall with 
its first extensive roster of daytime 
shows, building back from the re- 
vamped Mickey Mouse Club, which 



is now slotted in the late afternoon. 
Following ABC TV's success in 
nighttime this season, the big question 
only time can answer is how well the 
newcomer can do against two estab- 
lished networks already in an audience 
race. Of key interest: (1) whether 
ABC TV will chip away at the audience 
already established or whether its en- 
try will raise total sets-in-use during 
the daytime: (2l whether the new 
lower daytime price set by ABC TV 
will eventually influence the other nets. 

Impact of ABC TV: Programing ex- 
ecutives from all three networks agree 
that the da\time audience is far from 
saturated todav. Thev feel that good. 




^imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimmmiiiiiiiiiiimmmnmiiimiiiiiiiiii miiniiiiii mini in mum lllllllllllllimii 

ABC'S FALL PROGRAMING STRATEGY 

• At presstime. ABC TV's programing chiefs were in a 
budget meeting about fall daytime plans. Six shows being 
tentatively considered for kine in the 3:00-5:00 p.m. strip 
for October are: What Makes You Tick I Roy Windsor)! 
audience participation: Lucky Lady i Walt Framer I . audi- 
ence participation: Parlay I Bill Birch I . quiz: The Man in 
Your Life I Irving Mansfield!, new type; What's the \ame 
of That Tune I Jesse Martini, musical game: Guest of 
Honor l Howard Blake i . interview: all live half-hour shows. 



Stripping former nighttime prop- 
erties like Our Miss Brooks i above) 
< BS T\ 2 -.00-2 :30p.m. has set pattern 
foi NBC TV's Comedj Time 5:00 p.m. 



*n\/ 



Stronger participation shows like 
Queen foraDaj helped build NBC TV's after- 
noon lineup. Network's emphasis upon "happi- 
ness and fun" -lm\\~. rather than soap <>pera> 



38 




rtrons programing on a third network 
ma\ increase viewing interest, boost 

M-t-.-in-11-r and do i rl.it i\ elj little -plin- 

tering of the existing artwork audi- 
ence. 

oilic Treyz, v.p. in charge <>f VBC 
I \ . points out that \BC T\ affiliates 
in multi-station markets now have a 
substantial share of the total audience 
for their local programing. "Tins 
shows that there's ;• read) audience 
that's ripe for our network program- 
ing, without necessaril) taking away 

larjje chunks from the other two net- 
works. On the contrary, our entr) into 
the 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. period is likeK to 

boost sets-in-use during that time. It's 

been the pattern in t\ in the pasl that 
additional strong network program- 
ing in a particular time period Imilt 
that period's total viewing appeal." 

As the amount of daytime program- 
ing has increased over the past few 
\ears. total sets-in-use have indeed also 
climbed gradually. From 19.9 in 1954 
sets-in-use have gone to 22.5 in 1957. 
While thi- is less than three points in 
three \ears it represents a percentage 
increase of about 12' '< as well as a 
substantial growth in the number of 
homes due to sale of tv sets over the 
three years. 

"We expect to get the existing audi- 
ence reached by our affiliates now and 
then some. " says Tre\z. 

In the Eastern Standard Time zones, 
however. ABC T\ "s new programing 
block will be up against such stiff com- 
petition as NBC TV's top-rated Quern 
for a Day and a batch of steady-rated 
CBS 1 \ soaps. Considering the strong 
lead-in to this popular programing 
that CBS TV has developed prior to 
the 3:00-5:00 p.m. block, and the im- 
provement contemplated in that 2:30- 
3:00 p.m. trouble spot In NBC TV, 
\l!< l\ know- it faces tough compe- 
tition. Its strategy is built around 
video tape and "counter-programing" 

to reach younger audience groups. 

'"Our new daytime programing will 
be on "clock-time, which ui\es us a 
big advantage in the Central Time area 
particularly, where the bulk of daytime 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Intensified CBS TV-NBC TV daytime 
competition plus entry of ABC into 
afternoon programing may boost sets- 
in-use, say network programing heads. 
Early advertiser interest in daytime 
for fall may indicate maturing of medi- 
um. Price structures are changing. 



viewing occurs," [Yeyz told sponsor. 

B\ u-in^ it- \ ideo tapi tem and 
feeding the Central and I'.i. ifi< I 
/one- on clock time from < hit 
\B(. I\ will I"- getting it- nen shows 
to the stations in those areas al times 

when the competition fi the othei 

two network- i- less formidable. In 
other words, \l!< l\ - new shows h ill 
be up against local programing and 
early-afternoon feeds from < BS l\ 
and NBC I \ in those areas ■ •! the 
country which contribute the lai 
audience proportionate!) to t\. 

"We anticipate that clearances will 



of Is hoe I 

ihe new pi 

the .ti.ii I, feature 

v dl . . .ii-i-i ..f live half houi propei • 

Kines >>f the-.- shows are |>rii 

nighl now Pn . ji una w ill in. lode 

Glamor (,n\. in win. h 

the looks ..f women in front "f the 

v iewers inti \ mm 

VBt I \ does not plan to l-rii 
soap operas, but m dl < on< enlrate on 
Bhows with appeal t. 
to < ountei the othei two net* 
' \rtu /<• - ontinued next /-• 



CBS-NBC NOW IN CLOSE DAYTIME RACE 

(.hart -lion - Nielw n .. 

for the week) f..r the Brsl and second Februar) 19 

period. Percentage changes .i" based on ! 



NBC 



CBS 



RATING CHANCE 1MOW 



««TIK 



10:00-10:30 a.m. Home 



3.0 



36 Gam \b. 



7 6 



10:30-11:00 a.m. 



3.0 



25 Codfre 



9.1 



11:00-1 1:30 a.m. Price Is Right 7.0 133 



9 3 16 



1 1:30-1 1:45 a.m. Truth or Cons. 8.2 173 Strike It Rich 80 



36 



11:45-Noon 



8.2 • 173 Valiant I ad> 



6 7 



34 



Noon-i2:30 Tic Tac Dough 9.6 41 Love of Lih 



8 8 



26 



12:30-1 2:45 p.m. It Could Be You 9-0 -34 Srch for Tore 10 9 22 



12:45-1:00 p.m. 



9 



34 Guiding I ishl " * 



19 



1:30-2:00 p.m. „,,| programed 



Turns 8 



21 



2:00-2:30 p.m. not programed 



MissBrooks 7 4 l 



2:30-3:00 p.m. 



•nn- r.rnit 



7.9 



9 9 



13 



3:00-3:30 p.m. Matine 



9.1 



57 I 



9 4 



19 



3:30-4:00 p.m. 



9.1 57 



7 6 



22 



4:00-4:15 p.m. Queen for Da] 102 104 Brighter D 9 4 22 



4:15-4:30 p.m. 



4:30-4:45 p.m. 



12.8 



83 



* 



10 2 



14 



13.8 



14' I ,j_,. of \i 



9 9 



25 



4:45-5:00 p.m. Modern Rom. 9.8 -14- 



9 9 



25 



5:00-5:30 p.m. t..meil\ Time 12*3 -146 aot programed 



*\Y 



ilf-hmir LI- 



SPONSOR 



4 MAY 1957 



TV'S HOTTEST BATTLEGROUND . „n,inued . . 



"which have an older-age audience pal- 
tern in that time period. Bays Treyz. 

Daytime pricing: This is the year of 
evolution in daytime price structures. 
I lie pattern which tv had inherited 
from radio days, that is pricing day- 
time at a "C rate (or half the night- 
time i ale I. is being modified. 

When ABC TV announced its plans 
for expanding daytime programing 
hours to 3:00-5:00 p.m. on weekdaxs. 
it also announced a "D" rate, that is 
one-third of the nighttime rate. The 
move, based on the fact that daytime 
sets-in-use do not measure up to 50' < 
of nighttime, is important in the sales 
strategy of the network. 

Both CBS TV and NBC TV maintain 
that they intend to stick to the "C" 
rate and feel it is justifiable both in 
terms of advertiser success and low 
daytime cost-per-1.000. I Daytime cost- 
per-1.000 per commercial minute aver- 
aged SI. 03 compared with $3.25 for 
nighttime in January-February 1957, 
according to Nielsen.) Both CBS TV 
and NBC TV, however, are announcing 
a "D" rate for early morning starting 
this spring. In the case of CBS TV the 
new, lowered rate has applied to the 
7:00-9:00 a.m. period since 10 March 
1957. 

"This move to a "D" rate in early 
morning is in line with the rate struc- 
ture of individual stations and doesn't 
affect our pricing of the 10:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. day," says Bill Hyland. CBS 
I \ v.p. in charge of sales administra- 
tion. 

Says Bill Sargent, director of NBC 
TV "THT" programs: "We will main- 
tain the Class "C" rate in daytime ex- 
cept 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. which will be 
Class "D" as of 1 June. Some of our 
daytime programing has been so suc- 
cessful we should probably have raised 
rates." 

NBC TV separates "THT," that is 
Today. Home. Tonight, from its day- 
time programing and sales strategy. 
Thus a forthcoming change in the way 
participations in Today and Home will 
be sold will not affect the daytime sales 
strategy. 

"With those two shows we're in a 
service show area, not entertainment. 
-n we don't look on them as mass-audi- 
ence getters," says Mort Weiner, NBC 
TV v.p. in charge of daytime. "On 
the other hand, our 11:00 a.m. to 5:30 
p.m. lineup today is strictly entertain- 
ment intended to get mass viewing." 



Daytime programing: In terms of 
programing costs, daytime shows con- 
tinue to be extremely reasonable. It's 
generally agreed that if $35,000 is to 
be taken as an average cost for a night- 
time half-hour show, a daytime half- 
hour costs some $5,000 or less. 

In fact, daytime show costs have 
risen more slowly than nighttime ex- 
cept in the case of such network-pro- 
duced "experiments in quality" as 
NBC TV's Matinee, which features top 
talent in serious one-hour drama. 

The emphasis in daytime program- 
ing continues to be on games and par- 
ticipation programing, musical shows 
and a handful of soap operas ( all but 
one of them on CBS TV ) . 

"We got on the 'happiness-and-fun" 
kick around October 1955 to pull up 
our ratings, which were sagging pretl\ 
sadly in some spots at that time." says 
NBC TV's Mort Weiner. 

Since that time NBC TV has un- 
loaded most of its soap operas, with 
the exception of Modern Romances, a 
4:45-5:00 p.m. dramatic strip which 
tells one self-contained storv each 
week. Into the weak middle of the 
afternoon NBC TV put Matinee, to 
cut into CBS TV's lead provided by 
Houseparty 2:30-3:00 p.m. Within a 
month the 3:00-4:00 p.m. ratings 
showed a 26'v improvement. 

When NBC TV began shoring up its 
afternoon schedule back in October 
1955, its 3:00-6:00 p.m. programing 
was getting less than a 25' < share of 
the audience. CBS TV, on the other 
hand, had a strong lineup starting with 
Houseparty at 2:30 p.m. which gave 
the network a good audience carry over 
for the rest of the afternoon. 

Matinee helped break up this "CBS 
TV viewing pattern" a little, but the 
network still faced the problem of the 
2:30 to 3:00 p.m. lead-in and the hour 
and a half following the live drama. 
New shows added in the past vear to 
build NBC TV's late afternoon were 
Queen for a Day and Comedy Time. 

Comedy Time was NBC TV's answer 
to a new problem stemming from ABC 
TV's Mickey Mouse Club, 5:00-6:00 
p.m. which began clobbering the 
ratings of the other two networks from 
November 1955 onward. 

"We found out that over four mil- 
lion women watched t\ between 5 and 
5:30 p.m. even though there \\as no 
adult programing on at that time. 
says Carl Lindeman Jr., director of 
NBC TV daytime programing. "So we 
picked Comedy Time as a show for 



that period which might get adults 
and teen-agers too." 

Daytime -> In -d tiling : In daytime, 
block scheduling has been even more 
important than during nighttime. 
Clever schedule strateg\ frequentlv 
compensates for low-cost productions. 

lor instance, in 1956. \BC TV de- 
cided that the Home show kept the 
morning lineup from getting off the 
ground. After a slow start at 10:00 
a.m. with Ding Dong School and Ernie 
Kovacs, the network used to take a 
ratings dive to 3.0 w ith the Home show 
against Godfrey's 11.1 and Strike It 
Rich's 12.5. By simply moving Home 
to 10:00 a.m. and following it up with 
livelier game and variety programing, 
NBC TV pulled up its ratings neck and 
neck with the same CBS TV competi- 
tion it had had previously. 

NBC TVs afternoon scheduling 
strategy ran into strong counter- 
punches from CBS TV. When NBC TV 
moved in Matinee, it still faced an up- 
hill battle against CBS TV's strong 
lead-in. Houseparty, which precedes 
Matinee b\ half an hour. So NBC TV 
put in Tennessee Ernie at 2:30 p.m. 
to whittle awav Houseparty s ratings. 
CBS TV's ratings stayed high and CBS 
TV increased its edge by putting Miss 
Brooks in at 2:00, thus getting a lead 
where NBC TV has no network pro- 
graming. 

How does CBS TV look at daytime? 
Sa\s Oscar Katz. v.p. in charge of 
CBS TV daytime programs: "Daytime 
tv is moving from a one-network medi- 
um. Presumably . with ABC TV it can 
become a three-network medium. One 
or two years ago we had no daytime 
competition. Now it"s at a peak. Dur- 
ing a period of transition like this one 
we must be readv to make changes." 

If there are major programing 
changes in the offing for fall. CBS TV 
isn't read) to announce them. Its 
long-time trouble period. 7:00 to 9:00 
a.m. where CBS TV bucks Garroway, 
has undergone a number of facelifts 
this \ear as last. Currently. CBS TV is 
programing Jimmy Dean with country 
music between 7:00 and 8:00. followed 
by Captain Kangaroo for the kiddies. 

'"In those time periods where compe- 
tition has increased, sets-in-use have 
increased too," Katz told SPONSOR. "In 
the most competitive times. 11:00 a.m. 
to 1:00 p.m. and 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. 
there's been a 1<>'< increase in sets in 
use over last year." ^ 



40 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 




-^ \(& 






v 



I 





\ ^ 





' \G> 




QS&\ 



II*- 



lr<&\ 




They laughed when we sa Qfi^> 




They laughed when we si: 




They laughti 





pwn at th -^r(S>-! 




ifoen we sat down at the piano, but . . . 



. . beyond the blues horizon waits a wonderful day for WDSU listeners. 




Our repertoire takes New Orleanians far beyond the ear-wearying 




confines of rock-n-roll monotony into the wide open world of varied 




programming . . . varied to match the changing mood of a 24-hour audience. 



\ en i and i ieu i jot /• omen m 
advertising and wives oj admen 



Women's week 



l\"~ Convention: \ record numbei of wives joined top-level 
igencymen .it t h< - Greenbrier in White Sulphui Springs, W . va. 
last weekend for the annual lA's convention, - >-27 \pril. 

\ special program for ladies was planned under the chairmanship 
of \h~. Roberl D. Holbrook, wife of t *< n 1 1 [ »t « m Advertising's chair- 
man of the board. However, a number of the women accompanied 
their husbands ti> the business sessions. Tin- session with Dr. 
William Mt'im in»«'r i see below) was particularl) pertinenl foi wives 
concerned aboul the high pressure of the agenc) business. 

In tin* know: Wives "I admen who sometimes env) "careei 
women" in broadcasting for their interesting experiences, should 
drop a line to Madge Cooper, program director and directoi ol 
women's activities foi \\ \ll!\. Marion, Ohio. Here's how Madge 
sums up her in years plus as radio personality on the station's Ovei 
the Coffee Cups show : 

"One reason I wanted to work in a radio station was thai I liked 
being where news was coming in. How has that worked out? I left 
15 minutes before the bells started ringing for Pearl Harbor. I was 
in church when the Low Countries were invaded. I was driving 
across Iowa when the) went into Russia . . . and if the) hadn't 
warned us in advance, I wouldn't have been around for the end ol 
the war. In spite of all this, I love radio!" 

Motivation for car ownership: If you think you're buying a 
car for transportation, you're sadl) mistaken, according to a ( hicago 
Tribune stud) . 

Transportation ranks fourth in the list of eight reasons for cat 

ownership. Other reasons are: 
*'l. To acquire and demonstrate participation in society. 

2. lo extend one's life boundaries. 

3. lo acquire a sense ol power. 
I. to accomplish transportation. 

5. I'i> feel pride in -kill and mastery. 

(>. lo assert adult prerogatives and capabilities. 

7. To demonstrate status. 

!!. \s an outlet for aggression." 

Mental health of execs: In his speech at the I \ - convention, Dr. 
William Menninger suggested thai executives leam to '"make a rich 
life and not just a rich living." 

"Advertising i- a high pressure business," he said, "'with the ex- 
ecutive frequently in the middle between bis client-' pn ssu - □ tin- 
one hand and his creative ideas on the other. Some authorities have 
given figures to indicate thai the average age of advertising men who 
died in 1956 was 57.9 years— 12 years younger than men in other 
business at the time of their deaths." 



i 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 




IheNcISpot! 



KOSI in Denver 



r[ M 



.1 point lo KOSI 
js Denver s top independent 
st.ition Hooper |jn March 

14 6AM 193PM Pulse 
Feb 15 5 all d-i. 
Ratings continue to climb as 
proof ot KOSI i ever-rising 
popularity 



KOBY in San Francisco . . . 



"tfl 







KOBY • 

top with Feb March » 
Hoopcratings of 17 8 •' 
25 5 P M Saturday 29 3 and 
Sundayv 33 8' Ncilscn j. 
■ OBY at the numl 
independent all day KOBY 
operates full ' full 

time' Its 10000 watts ■ 
the most powerful indep 
station covering the entire 



See Forjoe 

for these KEY 

radio buys! 



d-America 
dcasting Co. 

vill*. Mist. WGVM 
1 In Hooper 
ond Nitlsen! 



15 



Radio Chicago 

WSS § 

Chicago's Busiest Radio Station! 



Yes, busy . . . busy . . . busy . . . adding new advertisers, 
receiving renewals from old advertisers, and all because of 
its fabulously phenomenal new programming which has 
captured the listeners of Chicagoland. This 50,000 watt 
shocker can turn any client's cold cash register into a 
steam-heated one! 




Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc. Stations: 

Radio Memphis I Radio Boston I Radio Baltimore 
WMPS WCOP WCAO 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



L6 



SPONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



'./> listing "/ ' h'tnxn 

in the advertising anil brondentt fitUtt 



NEW AND RENEW 



NEW ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 

SPONSOR AGENCY 



General Foods-Perkins Div, Chi 
Ccncral Foods Perkins Div. Chi 
R. | Reynolds. Winston-Salem 
Warner-Lambert. NY 
Warner-Lambert, NY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, itart. duration 



FC&B. Chi 
FC&B. Ch, 
Esty. NY 
SSC&B. NY 
SSC&B. NY 



CBS 57 Cjpt Kjnuiroo Tu 8 40 8 4$ im 14 Mi, II .. 

CBS 122 Opt Kangaroo Sj 9 35 9 40 im 4 Mi, 12 .kt 

NBC Bob Cummmgs Tu 9 JO- 10 pm 24 '. 

NBC Restless Cun MlliOpn 

NBC Tic Tjc Dough. tH Th 7 30 8 pm 12 V. 



RENEWED ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 

SPONSOR AGENCY STATIONS 



American Home Products. NY 

Colgate-Palmolive. NY 

General Electric. Bridgeport. Conn 

General Mills. Minneapolis 

Procter & Gamble. Cin 

Ralston Purina. St. Louis 



Bates. NY 
Bryan Houston. 
Y&R, NY 
DFS. NY 
Compton. NY 
CB&B. 



NY 



SF 



CBS 153 

CBS 153 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 

ABC 



PROGRAM, time, »tort, duration 

D Edwards Tu Th 6 45 7 7 1 5 7 30 pm 30 Apr 5: -• 

Big Payoff M F 3 3 30 pm ; I Apr 52 wks 

Cheyenne alt Tu 7 30-8 30 pm fall 52 wks 

Wyatt Earp. alt Tu 8 30 9 pm tall 52 wks 

Wyatf Earp; alt Tu 8 30 9 pm fall 52 wki 

Bold journey. M 8 30-9 pm July 52 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME FORMER AFFILIATION NEW AFFILIATION 

Ccrald Adlcr NBC. NY. coordinator talent & program contract operations California National Productions London European profram dir 

Floyde E. Beaston WNBQ. Chi. sis mgr Storer Broadcasting Chi midwest ty sis mgr 

Richard L. Bevington VVKRC, Cin. acct exec WBRC. Birmingham gen mgr 

Willard Block NBC Tv Net, NY. sis CBS Tv Film Sales NY acct e«ec 

Nathan Brook KNBX. Seattle, commercial sis mgr 

William S. Dallmann WRCV. Phila. local sis mgr Same sis mgr 

Van Bcurcn W. DeVries WGR-TV. Buff, program dir Same, stn mgr 

Lee Ellis KFSD-TV. San Diego, produccr-dir KFSD San Diego, program dir 

Marc Frederic Tee Vce Co. gen mgr S<recncraft Enterprises LA vp & gen mgr 

Philip George KVAL-TV. Eugene. Ore. varied Same, coordinator local sis 

George Cray WLW. Cin. gen sis mgr WLW-D Dayton gen mgr 

Richard F. Hess CBS Radio Spot Sales. NY, dir research CBS Radio Net. NY asst to vp chg stn admin 

Phil Hillman Roy Durstine. SF. acct exec KNX-CPRN Hy. dir sis promotion & advtng 

Ceorge Holland Army Counter-intelligence. Japan. Korea WBAL-TV. Bait, acct exec 

Carl Horwich Gerald. John & Asso. NY. acct exec WOV NY sis 

Eric Jensen WLW-D, Dayton, gen mgr Croslcy Broadcasting. Cm admin asst to vp chg tv 

Frank C King Ceorge P Hollingbcrry LA sis devel 

Paul E. Lucas WTIC. Hartford, asst program mgr Same, program mgr 

Harold C. Lund Westinghouse Broadcasting. Pitts, vp Same, member board 

Walter McNiff K&E. SF. regional mgr & acct super TvB SF. mgr 

William C. Moody KIMA-TV. Yakima, Wash, commercial prod mgr KEPR Radio & Tv. Pasco-Kcnncwick Richland Wash p- 

dir 

Edward C O'Berst CBS Radio Net. NY. asst dir rescarch-stn rep unit CBS Radio Spot Sales. NY. dir research 

Richard C. Ricker NBC. Chi. acct exec WNBQ Chi sis mgr 

Donald M. Ross KNX-CPRN, Hy. gen sis mgr Coldcn West Enterprises vp & gen mgr 

Robert T. Schlinkcrt WKRC-TV. Cm. asst gen mgr & gen sis mgr WBRC TV Birmingham gen mgr 

Harold W Waddell WRCV. Phila. dir sis Same stn mgr 

Maurie Webster KNX-CPRN. Hy. dir operations Same, gen sis mgr 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

I Blan van Urk 
A. B. Brooke 
Merlin E Carlock 
Robert A. Conn 
Phil Dcxhcimcr 

Ransom P Dunnell 

James S. Hauck 
Roger Hutzcnlaub 
Thomas E. Kniest 
Jesse Lowen 
Tom McCann 
Laura Wood Miller 
James Edward Muse 

William C. Pank 

O C Ritch 

Stephen M. Salonites _ 

Donald J. Sauers 

Paul R. Smith 

John H. Wilson |r 

Philip L. Worcester 

Cordon George Zellner 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Calkins & Holden. NY. vp & chm plans board 
Lexington Herald. Ky. asst to city editor 
Calkins & Holden. NY. vp & copy dir 
Official Film', rep covering Pcnn. Clevc. Bait. Wash 
KFXM. San Bernardino. Cal. pres & gen mgr 
H. B Humphrey. Alley & Richards NY. chg r-fv 
H B Humphrey. Alley & Richards, Boston, chg mktng 
Y&R. NY. r-tv research 
KXOK St Louis, radio sis 
.WMAZ. Macon. Ca 
KING. Seattle, acct exec 



Best & Co. NY. dir promotion & publicity 
WCEM-TV. Quincy. III. commercial 
Calkins & Holden. NY. vp 



Chamber of Commerce. Bakcrsfield. public relations dir 
B&B. NY. media 

Ceyer. NY. creative exec 

Calkins & Holden. NY vp & creative dir 

Crant. NY. acct exec 

KYW. Cleve. program & production mgr 
WATV. Newark. N|. acct exec 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, exec vp & admin dir organization 

VanSanf. Dugdalc. Bait acct cicc public relations div 

Same, vice chm board 

Edward Robinson Phila. vp chg sis & new business 

Raymond R. Morgan Hy. acct 

Same, also vp 

Same also vp 

Same, spot coordinating unit-media depf 

Katz St Louis radio sis 

Katz. NY. promotion-research depf 

Mill.' J oeck & Hartung Staftle. asst ace I 

Kennedy. Walker 6 Woolen Beverly Hills ace 

Katz St Louis, tv sis 

Same, senior vp 

Gucnn lohnsfonc lcffr.es LA dir public relations 

Katz NY tv sis devel 

Vic Maitland. Pitts vp & creative dir 

Same, pres 

Same. Detroit, dir merch O sis promotion 

F&S&R. Cleve mgr r-fv-film dept 

Katz. NY tv sis 



P 



SPONSOR 



4 MAY l 1 )",, 



Follow-the-leader is a great game — for children. Grown-ups who play it 
are mere lacklusters and lardbottoms. Especially in the business world. No doubt about it. 

can be a perfectly respectable mackerel simply by swimming along alter your fellow-m; 
erel. But it's a whole lot more exhilarating to make your tidy buck by bucking the tide. 

That goes for our business as well as yours. Traditionally in the TV film 
syndication field, you're supposed to make your big deals first. Get off your production nut! 
Go after a network sale! No soap? (Or cereals, or cigarettes? ) Then make your pitch for the 
giant regional deals. Only after that can you afford to sell smaller regional, or local, sp 
That's the going theory. And that's where we part company with all the other macki 

In our book, the local, regional and spot advertiser is strictly a fir 
class citizen who needs, wants and rates first crack at first-class syndicated TV film produ 

With this mad, impetuous notion, we sent our new syndicated submarine- 
adventure series, "The Silent Service," down the ways. We aimed it straight at non-network 
advertisers. And in only 24 days, we not only matched the heady dollar i if a major net- 

work deal, we topped it. Our biggest regional deal involved just four markets. We 
nut — and the biggest part of our potential still stretches out way ahead of us like a sunlit 

The syndication market a secondary on NP would notice. Prime 

syndicated TV film properties for local, regional and spot advertis ly — thai s 

idea of a big deal. And it's working just fine. NBC TELEVISION T ILMo 

a division of CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS 



TELEPULSE 



RATINGS: TOP SPOl 





















Rank 

DM 


Patf 
rank 


Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 

Period 1-7 March 1957 

TITLE, SYNDICATOR, SHOW TYPE 


Average 
ratings 


7-STATI0N 
MARKETS 


5-STA. 
MARKET 


4-STATION MARKETS 


3-STATI0l'i 


NY. 


LA. 


S. Fran. 


r, . _ Seattle- 
Boston Chicago Detroit Milw. Mnpls. Phlla. Tacoma Wash. 


Atlanta 1 


1 


1 


Highway Patrol (M) 

ZIV 


22.6 


13.9 

wrca-tv 
T :1111pm 


15.0 

kttv 
9:00pm 


19.9 

kron-tv 
6:30pm 


20.9 10.0 18.9 11.2 13.7 19.8 19.7 17.3 

wbz-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv wcau-tv komo-tv wtop-tv 
10:30pm 8:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 


21.5 

waga-tv 
7:30pm 


2 


4 


Sheriff of Cochise (W) 

NTA 


20.6 


5.3 

wabd 

7 :30pm 


16.2 

kron-tv 
6:30pm 


28.7 17.5 17.9 10.5 17.2 26.9 10.5 

wnac-tv wnbq wwj-tv wtmj-tv wo king-tv wrc-tv 
6:00pm 7:30pm 7:00pm 10 :30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 


12.5 

wsb-ti 

7 :00pm 


3 


2 


State Trooper (A) 

MCA 


20.4 


4.5 

wor-tv 
9:00pm 


8.2 

khj-tv 

8:00pm 


10.2 

kgo-tv 
10 :00pm 


21.7 18.9 14.2 10.5 

wnac-tv wnbq kstp tv WTCv-tv 
10:80pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 


20.9 

waga-tv 
7:00pm 


4 


5 


Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal (D) 

MCA 


20.0 


7.5 

km 
9:00pm 


12.9 

kpix 
7:00pm 


18.9 11.2 12.7 21.2 10.9 

wnbq wxyz-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv 
10:00pm 10:30pm 8:00pm 7:30pm 


15.4 

wsb-tv 
10:30pm 


5 


3 


Death Valley Days (W) 

PACI Fl C BORAX 


19.8 


10.2 

wrca-tv 

r :00pm 




15.2 10.7 22.9 8.5 18.9 

wnbq wwj-tv weeo-tv wm tv komo-tv 
9:30pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 9:00pm 


16.0 ll 

ww] -a wbpfl 
6:30pm 7:(H 


6 


7 


Superman (A) 

FLAMI NGO 


18.2 


8.0 

wabc-tv 

fi :00pm 


6.9 

kttv 

7 :00pm 


9.2 

kgo-tv 
6 :00pm 


23.5 12.8 9.8 10.8 17.5 26.5 20.0 16.5 

wnac-tv wgn-tv wxyz-tv wlti-tv wceo-tv wcau-tv king-tv wrc-tv 
6:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:0Opm 4:30pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


22.2 2)1 

wsb-tv wbB 
7:00pm 7:iH 


7 


8 


Science Fiction Theater (SF) 

Zl V 


17.9 


9.2 

wrca-tv 

7:00pm 


13.0 

kttv 
7:00pm 


19.0 

kron-tv 
7:00pm 


19.4 10.2 10.2 7.9 8.5 8.9 22.0 9.7 

wbz-tv wnbq wxyz-tv wtmj-tv kmgm-tv wfil-tv king-tv wmal-tv 
7:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 11:00pm 8:30pm 10:30pm 10 :00pm 6:00pm 


18.0 ll 

waga-tv wtH 
7:00pm 10 1 


8 




Men of Annapolis (A) 

Z 1 V 


17.7 


13.2 

knxt 
7:00pm 


14.7 

kpix 
10:30pm 


10.2 13.2 16.2 20.5 13.7 

wgn-tv wlsn-tv weeo-tv komo-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 9:00pm 4:00pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 


1!| 

in A 

10 J 


8 




Badge 714 (M) 

NBC FILM 


17.7 


3.8 

wpix 

8:30pm 


13.3 

kttv 
7 :30pm 


19.2 

kpix 
9:00pm 


21.8 10.9 23.4 10.9 17.8 12.2 

wnac-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv kstp-tv king-tv wttg 
6:30pm 8:00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm fi :00pm 7:00pm 


24.2 11 

wsb-tv wll 
7:00pm 7:1 


10 


8 


Annie Oakley (W) 

CBS FILM 


17.5 


6.8 

wabc-tv 
6:00pm 


7.7 

kabc 
6:00pm 


7.2 

kgo-tv 
6:00pm 


24.5 20.9 10.8 17.9 20.7 20.2 21.0 13.5 

wnac-tv wbbm-tv wxyz-tv wtmj-tv wceo-tv wcau-tv king-tv wtop-tv 
5:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 5:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


14.8 lj 

wlw-a wbl E 

6:00pm '■> \ t. 


Rank 

INW 


Part* 


Top 10 shews in 4 to 9 markets 


1 




Life of Riley (C) 

NBC Fl LH 


20.7 


18.0 

kttv 
8:30pm 


24.3 

kron-tv 
7:00pm 


17.7 12.4 31.2 

wrbq kstp-tv king-tv 
6:00pm 6:00pm 7:30pm 




2 




Doug. Fairbanks Presents (D) 

ABO FILM 


20.3 


12.3 

wrca-tv 

10:30pm 


2.1 

kgo-tv 

1:30pm 


16.2 

wtmj-tv 
9:30pm 


12.4 

wsb-tv 
7:00pm 


3 




Esso Golden Playhouse (D) 

OFFICIAL FILM 


18.2 






17.9 16.9 9.7 

wbz-tv wcau-tv wrc-tv 
7:00pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 


1! 

w 

7 1 


4 




Last of the Mohicans (A) 

TPA 


17.2 


6.4 

BTCB 

7 IN 


14.9 

kpix 

fi :30pm 


24.2 

king-tv 
6 :00pm 


4 
wll 


5 


4 


Count of Monte Cristo (A) 

TPA 


16.7 


1.7 

wabd 

8:30pm 


4.9 

kttv 
5:00pm 




31.0 8.3 7.7 11.0 

wnac-tv wbkb cklw-tv wtop-b 
8:30m 4:00pm 7:00pm 6:30pm 




6 




1 Led Three Lives (A) 

ZIV 


15.4 


2.3 

wpix 
8:00pm 


11.4 

kttv 

8 im 




21.4 6.7 

wnac-tv wgn-tv 
7:30pm 9:30pm 


1 

Hi 


7 


8 


Code Three (M) 

ABC FILM 


14.7 


13.0 

kttv 
9:30pm 


17.5 

kron-tv 
10:80pm 


8.2 12.9 10.5 20.6 13.9 

wxyz-tv wlsn-tv wrcv-tv king-tv wtop-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 




8 


6 


Patti Page (Mu) 

SCREEN GEMS 


14.6 


6.0 

webs ti 
6 :15pm 




15.3 5.6 10.0 

wnac-tv wwj-tv wimj-tv 
7:15pm 11:15pm 10:00pm 




9 




Crunch & Des (A) 

NBC FILM 


14.2 






26.2 9.0 

wnac-tv wttg-tv 

v iii 0:30pm 


1 

U 

10 


10 


9 


Jungle jim (A) 

SCREEN GEMS 


13.9 


4.9 

wabc-tv 
6:00pm 


9.3 

kttv 
6:00pm 




7.7 15.7 13.8 

wnbq, wxyz-tv wmal-tv 
1:00pm 2:30pm 6:00pm 






Shoo 
myit 
dies 
an 


r type symbols: (A) adventure: (C) comedy; (D) drama: (Doe 
err: (Mu) muilcal; (8) sport; (SF) Science Fiction; (W) V 
ed. H or.. Vt hr. A hr. length, telecast In four or more m 
inwelfhled average of Individual market ratings listed abov 


I documentary 
Western. Filn 
arkets. Trie 
:. Blank spa 


: (K) kids: <M> 
a listed are syn- 
average ratine Is 
ce Indicate* film 


not 1 
mitnll 
syndi 
aiiutb 


roadcasl in this market 1-7 March. While network shows are fstrl 

to another in the markets in which they are shown, this Is true to mud 

;ated shows. TTni should be borne in mind when analyzing rating trends 

er In this chart. •Refers to last month's charL If blank, shew was not 


v stable M \ 
i lesser ext# 
from one is 
rated at all 



LM SHOWS 



• ON MARKETS 



r*)umbui St. L. 



7 31.9 27.5 

. t> kwk-lt 

3npm 10 00pm 

9 28.9 15.5 

. u k«.l if 

>pm 10 30pm 



30.2 

kid ir 
9 30pm 



23.2 

ksd-tf 
9 30pm 



5 32.0 31.9 

t wbns If k«k it 
9 30pra 9:30pm 



18.3 12.8 



wbns If 
I Mpn 



ksd-ti 

I iopn 



16.0 

ksdtT 
10:00pm 



f 25.2 



23.2 



I 21.3 

wbns-tf kv»k 
(:00pm 6 OOp 



: 



2-STATION MARKETS 



Blrm Charlttt* D»y1»n Now Or Prtvldtnca 



30.0 39.8 45.8 29.5 

nhrc If WhlO If «iliu li «J»r If 

00pm 9:00pm 10 :00pm 10:30pm 



45.8 25.8 

Hi, IV «|» ,1 

10 BOum l" 10pm 



27.5 

Hlim Iv 
7:00pm 



30.8 

■bTC tv 

■ now 



34.8 39.5 



WfalO iv 

: DOpm 



LI pn 



25.3 62.5 



29.5 24.8 



wibt 
9:30pm 



wbtf 
8 :0©pm 



v..l>u Iv 
10:30pm 



wpro-tf 
T :00pm 



60.3 8.8 

ulitv >»hv .1 
8:00pm 1 



14.8 

wjar-tf 



33.8 30.3 26.3 14.3 

wbtf «hlr> If wdlU-t? wjir-tr 
5:30pm 6:00pm 5:00pm 6:00pm 



27.3 53.5 188 38.5 22.3 



wbrc-tT 

itlpm 



wbtr whr-d wdsu-tT wpro tr 
: 00pm 10:30pm 10:00pm : 



25.0 31.8 



whtv 

3 DOpm 



1 1'lll 



20.8 

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in mpm 



34.3 



20.3 
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21.3 17.3 29.3 15.3 

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6 00pm 






24.3 



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18.9 16.0 

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: 10pm 1" 30pm 



15.0 18.2 



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kuk-tv 
5:00pm 



60.3 

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9:00pm 



5.9 

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41.3 17.5 



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10:30pm 



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; "hi, mi 



19.5 

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26.8 

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29.3 



rXher than top 10. Classification u to number of stations In 

own. Pulse determines number by measuring which stail'His 

Ted by homes In the metropolitan area of a rlreo market 

ion Itself may be outside metropolitan area of the market 



,v^;.^ w 



uP Gill-Perna is now 

National Representative for 

WTVP Decatur, III. 
Bringing Top 

O Programs to a Billion 
Dollar Market 



only wtvp delivers 

c:ade a coverage of 

illinois 2 in 1" 

decatur-springfield 

MARKET 




51 



MRS. TYLER 

ISA 
COMMERCIAL 

MINUTE 
IMPRESSION 




ND AN ADVERTISER BUYS 
VER 26 MILLION OF THEM 
A SINGLE WEEK WITH JUST 
IVE UNITS OF CBS RADIO'S 
DAYTIME DRAMA! 



Put it another way: an advertiser reach 
over 8 million different Mrs. Tylers (and 
their families) each more than three times 
a week with solid, one-minute impressions 
each time. At just about the lowest cost- 
per-thousand available in any medium. 
Today -with so much money going into 
once-a-week or once-a-month advertising - 
it makes good sense to extend and insure 
your budget with this kind of frequency 
and reach. And it makes most sense to fit 
your message into identifiable programs 
with a beginning and an end -specific 
dramas to tune to every day. 
That's why you find companies that sell 
low-cost, high-turnover products, compa- 
nies like Colgate-Palmolive, General Foods 
and Lever Brothers, all buying (and re- 
buying) daytime drama on CBS Radio. 



FREQUENCY YOU CAN AFFORD AND NEED. . THE CDS RADIO NETWORK 







a iimiii!i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mm': 

I WTOX I 



100ofl^ AT TSJ 

personality station de luxe 
in WILMINGTON 

YOUR BIG 
BARGAIN 

station covering the millions 
in the rich Delaware Valley 

ask your Walker man about 
the "Timekeeper Show" 6:00- 
9:00 A.M. 

for results that count and can 
be counted use 



WTGIX 



Wilmington, Dcla. 
1290 on the dial 

|lO?oJ~"'S| 

II I II minium mi III! 



National and regional spot buys 
in work noic or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



54 



TV & RADIO BUYS 

Kasco Mills, Waverly, New York, is entering about 60 tv markets 
to promote its dog food. Campaign will start 6 May and run for 
seven weeks; schedule will resume in the fall. There'll be minute 
and 20-seconds in daytime with the number of announcements per 
week varying from market to market. In radio. daUime minutes will 
be bought in a number of rural areas to supplement tv with minutes 
slotted in daytime hours. Film commercials on tv. and e.t.'s on 
radio, will feature a talking dog. Objective: women's audience. 
Buying is completed. Buyer: Art Topol. Agencj : Donahue & Coe, 
New York. 

Nehi Corp., Columbus, Ga.. is expanding its use of spot tv and 
radio throughout the country. The earlv Mav schedule will run 
indefinitely. Tv minutes, 20's and I.D.'s have been requested for 
nighttime hours, to reach a general audience. The number of an- 
nouncements per w r eek varies from market to market. On radio, 
minute spots have been requested for daytime hours, for a women's 
audience. Commercials are on film and e.t.'s. Bming is almost com- 
pleted. Buyer: Genevieve Schubert. Agency: Compton, New York. 

TV BUYS 

Esso Standard Oil Co., is buying in about 28 tv markets in the South 
to promote its Flit. The campaign begins in late Mav for 15 weeks. 
Minute films will be scheduled during daytime hours. Frequencv is 
limited; about three per week in each market. Buying is not com- 
pleted. Buyer: Jay Schoenfeld. Agency: McCann-Erickson. N. Y. 

RADIO BUYS 

Trans World Airlines, Inc., Kansas City. Mo., is buying a sched- 
ule in major markets (for domestic travel). Six-week campaign 
starts shortly. Announcements will be placed around-the-clock with 
a heavy weekend schedule; the advertiser seeks a wide general audi- 
ence. Average number of announcements per Aveek in each market 
v\ill be 30. Minute commercials will consist of a 40-second e.t. fea- 
turing a celebrity and a 20-second live tag. Buying is completed. 
Buyer: Paul Clark. Agency: Foote. Cone & Belding. New York. 

Pomatex Co., Inc., New York, is buying announcements for its 
hair preparation in major markets in New England. New York. 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Michigan. Illinois. Ohio and West Vir- 
ginia, its major areas of distribution. Campaign will sell the product 
as a hair protector against water and sun: schedule in each market 
will begin with warm weather. Minute live announcements will be 
slotted primarily 7-9 a.m. and 5-7 p.m.. to reach both men and 
women. Average number of announcements per week in each market 
will be 12. Buying has just started. Buyer: Jack Cunningham. 
Agency: R. T. O'Connell. New York. 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 




mnwMrBninnra 



built your 

TELEPHONE 



. . . and 



WW J -TV 



80 years ago, the first 
telephone switch- 
boards were operated 
by boys. 




BELL TELEPHONE men and women, working together 

to bring people together, treated a faith that produced 
today's fast, dependable telephone servi. • 
WWJ-TV. with its 10 years of leadership and emphafl 
quality, has given Detroiters another well-founded faith - 
faith that dialing Channel 4 always provides the 
television. 

SEEING IS BELIEVING to the great WWJ-TV aud 
—a priceless advantage to every advertiser. 



Today, Michigan Bell telephone operators 
put through Long Distance calls in 80 sec- 
onds, on an average. More than half of 
Michigan Bell's customers can dial some of 
their own Long Distance calls — to places 
as far away as Boston and San Francisco — 
even faster. 



Tenth Anniversary Year 




- ON WWJ 
- -*d t oprrofd bf Tf» C*f- 
Nolionol Representatives Pcfcrs, Gfffin, WexxJword. Inc. 



SPONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



55 




That wonderful sound of WBC's local programs is no 
accident. Il takes a wide-awake, aggressive organization 
to corral the best disc jockeys in every market . . . fire up 
the mobile units, beep phones and tape recorders that 
make < m-t he-scene news come alive . . . produce local 



public service programs that capture national i 
On top of this, there's the expert programming 
ance each station gets from WBC group adv 
programming that makes WBC stations th<| 
listened-to in their areas. 




SERVICE 



w; 



El 




I»W 1ST 



hi want to know how little it costs to put the 

mi! difference on WBC Radio to work for you if 

int proof that no selling campaign is complete 

the WBC stations call A. W. "Bunk" Dannen- 

iWBC V.P.-Sales, at MUrray Hill 7-0808, N.Y. 



WESTINGHOUSE 
BROADCASTING 
COMPANY, INC. 



BOSTON 

PITTSBURGH 

FORT WATNC WOWO 
CHICAGO 

PORU«Sf 

BOSTON . 

M 

SAN SBXHCIV ) 

: S..*-i 

Another WBC frl 

Pwe*v Grrffcn *o---r« > 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



RADIO RESULTS 



MACARONI PRODUCTS 

SPONSOR: Gooch Milling Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Rose bushes are selling macaroni 
these days through a special radio offer made by Gooch 
Milling. Lincoln. Neb., which resulted in movement of $15,- 
060 worth of Gooch products (flour, spaghetti, macaroni, 
etc.). Each package of Gooch products carries Red Circle 
points which are redeemable in merchandise. KMA's Mon- 
day-through-Saturday morning program, Farmer's Wife 
with Florence Falk. broadcast an offer of a free rose bush to 
those who sent in 40 Red Circle points on 1 April only. The 
offer was made on 30 March and by 5 April, a total of 3.012 
orders for the rose bushes had been counted. Gooch Mill- 
ing estimates that a customer spends about $5.00 to amass 
40 points which means that the number of orders received 
represents $15,060 in sales. Wallace Closner. sales and 
advertising promotion manager for Gooch, stated that the 
campaign brought results far beyond the firm's expectations. 

KM \. Shenandoah, Iowa PURCHASE: Participations 



CANNED VEGETABLES 

SPONSOR: Butter-Kernel Canned Vega AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Radio enabled this sponsor to win 
its long-standing battle to gain an important new outlet for 
its products. For years, Butter-Kernel Canned Vegetables 
had been attempting to gain distribution in the 14 Still- 
man's Supermarkets in Minneapolis. All efforts failed re- 
peatedly until soon after Butter-Kernel became a sponsor of 
station WCCO's Housewives' Protective League with Allen 
Gray. Success came with an initial order from Stillman's 
for 25 cases of Butter-Kernel products. The first was fol- 
lowed by another order for 100 cases and then another still, 
this time for 125 cases. Now Butter-Kernel products have 
a firmly established distribution in all 14 Stillman's mar- 
kets. George Stillman. when asked to explain the super- 
markets' final acceptance of the products, reported that 
"we had to stock Butter-Kernel because of the public de- 
mand created by Allen Grav"s broadcasts on WCCO." 



WCCO, Minneapolis-St Paul 



PURCHASE: Housewives' 

Protective League 



PAINT 

SPONSOR: National Paint Co. AGENCY: Tilds & Cantz 

Capsule case history: This advertiser's use of spot radio 
during the firm's normally slow season resulted in a 20% 
sales increase for 1956 over the same period in 1955. Na- 
tional Paint deliberately scheduled its campaign for Septem- 
ber and October, the slow 7 months for paint sales, in order 
to measure radio's effectiveness in presenting a new adver- 
tising and selling approach for paint products. Three Los 
Angeles radio stations were used in the campaign, including 
KBIG. The impact of the campaign was evident not only 
in the sales increase but also in the results of a survey con- 
ducted by Tilds & Cantz among all paint dealers and paint- 
ing contractors in southern California. A total of 65% of 
the respondents said they either had heard National's com- 
mercials themselves or had learned from customers that the 
firm's message reached them via radio. KBIG was the sta- 
tion mentioned most often during the Tilds & Cantz survey. 

KBIG, Hollywood PURCHASE: Announcements 



FISH 

SPONSOR: Cannarella's Fish Market AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Cannarella Fish Market credits 
radio advertising with causing the heaviest volume of sales 
for a single day in the market's history. On this particular 
day, a Saturday, the sponsor used station WOIC as its only 
advertising medium. Cannarella's bought 10 20-second an- 
nouncements, aired at various times during WOIC s Satur- 
day morning schedule. The total cost for the 10 announce- 
ments was $20. R. E. Floyd, owner of the market, stated 
that Canarella's had anticipated moving approximately 100 
pounds of fish as a result of its commercials. Instead, 600 
pounds were sold during the day with demand finally out- 
stripping supply. Flovd estimates that over 400 customers 
entered the market during the course of the day. a record 
number. The radio advertising expenditure not only gave 
Cannarella s a sales increase but also brought in many new 
customers who had heard the market's announcements. 

WOIC. Columbia, S. C. PURCHASE: Announcements 



58 



SPONSOR 



1 mw 195*3 




Top-drawer advertisers buy 
WGN-radio in Chicago 

You're in good company when you join the nation's smart' 
time-buyers who confidently select WGN to sell millions of 
dollars worth of goods for top-drawer clients. 

1957 promises exciting new programming to make \Y( rN's 
policy of high quality at low cost even more attractive to you. 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



59 




60 



PL 


s 


A > * 






\pgr-, '^^\ 


SPONSOR 


• 


4 may 1957 




Like sire. ..like son 

Among thoroughbreds, prized qualities are handed down from father to son. 
In radio and television, too, championship can be transmitted within a family. 

WKY radio is one of America's great pioneer stations. WKY-TV quickly 
achieved dominance in Oklahoma television. Now the same experience, -kills. 
and resources have been extended throughout the WKY Television System, 

creating stations that clearly lead in their communities. Experience proves: 
In thoroughbreds and in television advertising, it pays to choose a championship line. 



THE WKY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. 



WKY-TV Oklahoma City 
WKY Radio Oklahoma City 
WSFA-TV Montgomery 
WTVT Tampa-St. Petersburg 

Represented by the Katz Agency 




SPONSOR 



4 MAY 1957 



61 




The big city half of Minnesota, 
we mean. You can woo the 
Minneapolis-St. Paul Market with 
a million and a half "please buy" 
letters. Or you can spread your 
budget thin on half a dozen 
runner-up stations. But for 
immediate sales impact, you've 
got to reach Minn where she 
listens— on WLOL. 

WLOL'S Big 5 disc jockeys give 
you the quickest, most 
responsive, block-by block 
coverage in the big Twin Cities 
orbit. Add WLOL'S unparalleled 
out-of-home audience and you'll 
see why more advertisers sell 
more products on WLOL than on 
any other independent station in 
this market. 





MINNEAPOLIS 



ST. PAUL 



1330 on your dial 5000 watts 

LARRY BENTSON, President 
Wayne "Red" Williams, Mgr., Joe Floyd, V.P. 



PULSE PROVES WLOL 

STATION IN THE 
NORTHWEST 

BUY IN THE 

TWIN CITIES 



represented by AAA Radio Sales 




News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

There'll be at least 13 program 
series sponsored by automotives 
on nighttime network tv this fall. 
Shows breakdown as follows: 

Sunday — Lincoln-Mercury (Ed Sul- 
livan), Chevrolet {Chevy Hour) 

Monday - - Dodge-Plymouth (Top 
Tunes & New Talent), Buick (Wells 
Fargo). Ford (Crisis) 
Tuesday — none as yet 
Wednesday — none as yet 
Thursday — Chevrolet (Pat Boone). 
Ford {Tennessee Ernie Ford), Chrys- 
ler (Climax), De Soto (Groucho 
Marx) 

Friday — Plymouth (Date With the 
Angels). Buick I show to be selected). 
Ford (Zane Grey) 

Saturday — Dodge I Laurence Welk ) 
Added to these will be: nine specials 
for Oldsmobile ( six Jerry Leuis Shoivs, 
two Dean Martin Shows and the Acad- 
emy Awards telecast) ; five Desi Arnaz 
specials for Ford; for General Motors. 
Wide Wide World series on Sunday 
afternoons and for the Chrysler model, 
a show to be selected. 

(See "What's Behind Detroit's $100 
million Air Budget?" page 27; and 
SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 9, for esti- 
mate of automotive tv network com- 
mittments. I 

The Tea Council is upping its ad 
budget by 80% — and will spend 
$1.8 million for consumer adver- 



tising this year. Here's where the 
money will go: 

• Largest share to "restore hot tea 
advertising to its former level of ef- 
fectiveness." 

• To expand market-by-market cov- 
erage to 18 cities by Fall (now 12 
basic markets are used I . 

• S600.000 to promote iced tea 
during the summer via spot radio in 
29 markets. I See Spot Buys for further 
information on this saturation cam- 
paign.) 

American Toy Promotion will ex- 
pand its tv coverage at Christmas to 
include 25 key markets, five more than 
were used in 1956. . . . General Foods' 

Perkins division is adding another 
flavor to its Kool-Aid line. The new 
soft drink powder, Golden Nectar, will 
be promoted via radio and tv in the 
late spring and summer months. 

People in the news: Roger Greene 

has been elected vice president in 
charge of advertising for Philip Mor- 
ris. Other new v.p.'s for the tobacco 
firm include: Andrew C. Britton. 
manufacturing, and Walter N. Me- 
Fadden, purchasing. . . . R. W. 
Moore, Sr., has relinquished his of- 
fice as president of Canada Dry to 
become chairman of the board. His 
son, Roy W. Moore, Jr., has been 
elected president. . . . L. F. Carlson, 
director of advertising for Oldsmobile. 



02 




KOMO-TV (Seattle) dancers on rooftop 

kick off promotion {or hydroplane race tele- 
cast as viewers "ii street watch via L10- 
inch lens i>n remote truck two Mocks awa> 



TIMEBUYERS attending WWVA, Wheeling, 
W. Va., presentation in New York include (1 
to r) Marie Scotto. Joan Rutman (Grey). Bob 
Boulward (Houston), Sally Reynolds (L&N) 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



eli i iiil in retire undei the I lenei .il 
Motors retirement plan this week. . . . 
Harr) L. Vuli is the nevi advertis 
in^ manage] foi Chrj Bier. \ u 1 1 fill- 
ilir vacanc) created l>\ the retirement 
of John II. Caron. 

AGENCIES 

( urrenl issue of Grej Matter (put 
out 1»\ Grej Vdvertisina) rebuts 
recent claims bj some researchers 
thai the consumer is developing ;i 
hard shell against hard sell. 

Rather than mentalhj tuning-out a 
commercial, Grej Matter Bays, "The 
American public lias demonstrated 
that, conscious!} or subconsciously, it 
wants to be exposed to advertising 
probabl) as eagerl) as advertisers want 
tn |iin\ ide the exposure." 

Theme is thai the consumer looks 
to advertising to lei him know about 

new product- and then to help him 
pick tin >~« • he wants and tell him lm« 

In use them. 

Harbourmaster, new starter for 
l»e\ nolds Tobacco on CBS TV next 
Fall, was the brain-child of the tv de- 
partment at F.st\. The "eastern", which 
u sea series using the New England 
-i line as background, was con- 
ceived 1>\ Sam Northcross, assistant to 
the president Northcross then looked 
around for a packager and finalrj se- 
lected Ziv fudges picked for 

the National Vdvertising Agencv 
Network's 1 ( ).»7 Creative Awards 
contest of radio and t\ campaigns in- 
clude: Howard H. Bell, NARTB; 
James E. Kovach, WHC & \\ RC-TV, 
W. Norman Reed. WW DC & W W'DC- 
IM: and Tliomas B. Jones, W TOI'-TN 
— all of Washington, I). C. Wards will 
be announced at the Network's annual 
convention at Sun Valle) in June. 

Personnel changes: Basil W. Mat- 
thews has been appointed v.p. and 
.il.. mnt supervisor at RulhrautT & 
Ryan. . . . Robert E. Field has joined 
MacManus, John & Adam- as assistant 
unt executive. . . . John I). 
< arew, Jr., is now- research director 
at Zimmer, Keller & Calvert. . . . Dik 
^. Twedt lias joined Leo Burnett's 
Chicago office as an account executive. 
. . . Edward P. Heath moves to Ted 
Bates as an account executive. . . . 
James W. McFarland and Charles 
R. Schwab have joined the market- 
ing and research department of Ketch- 
urn. MacLeod & Grove, Pittsburgh. 




Folks are in /W with ^A^^A^-DG^ 

1st in total audience— 1st in quarter hour wins— Washington, D.C. 

• PULSE: January-February. 1957 REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR 1 COMPANY 




£ DAV/S 



mind the uranium, Charlie, wait 'til you hear tchal's happening a; H PTR. 



SPONSOR 



4 MAY 195' 



63 



-^r" 




248,898 Telephone 

Stations 




In the Centra! Ohio area there are 
248,898 telephone stations — that means 
our folks like to talk but they like to 
listen when the message is carried by 
WBNS Radio. And these listeners have 
$2,739,749,000 to spend. They and Pulse 
place us first in any Monday-thru-Friday 
quarter-hour, day or night. 
Ask John Blair. 

WBNS RADIO 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Spring has sprung 
in Providence, R. I. 




• afternoon audience 
grows 324% 

• morning audience 
grows 297% 

WICE is how either first or second in 
audience in 16 daytime quarter hours. 

... in just 6 months of Elliot 
programming 

Source: C. E. Hooper, Jan.-March 1957 



The ELLIOT STATIONS W 

great independents • good neighbors jf tim ELLIOT, President 



Akron. Ohio - WCUE / WICE - Providence, R. 
National Representatives The John E. Pearson Co. 




. . . Henry G. Fownes, Jr., v.p. in 
charge of the New York office of Mac- 
Manus. John & Adams, has heen pro- 
moted to the administrative commit- 
tee. . . . William A. Baumert, for- 
merl) a partner in Frank Baumert 
Co.. has joined Paris & Peart as an 
account executive and Joseph Pend- 
ergast has moved over to P&P as a 
marketing account executive. . . . H. 
K. (Ken) Jones has been made di- 
rector of marketing and research at 
Griswold-Eshleman. . . . Robert W. 
Hoebee is now an account executive 
at J. M. Hickerson. Inc. . . . John R. 
Burrill has joined the William Schal- 
ler Co. as a member of the client serv- 
ice staff. . . . L. C Hopper has been 
named account supervisor at Dix & 
Eaton. . . . Sherman Slade has been 
appointed executive vice president of 
the Mayers Division of Cunningham & 
Walsh. Mayers moves over from Dan 
B. Miner Co. 

New agency v.p.'s: Ben Gedalecia, 

v.p. in charge of research : Ralph H. 
Major, Jr.. v.p. in charge of public 
relations and Henry J. Payne — all at 
BBDO. . . . Harold D. Frazee, as v.p. 
and account supervisor at Bryan 
Houston. 

Sylvester (Pat) Weaver's new of- 
fices for his Program Service are lo- 
cated at 430 Park Ave.. New York. 
Telephone: PL 8-0139. . . . Caples 
Co.'s New York offices are now at 10 
East 40th St. . . . Agency name 
change: Thomas & Delehanty is now 
Thomas & Douglas. 

New agency appointments : BBDO 

for Western Airlines. . . . MacManus, 
John & Adams for Minnesota Min- 
ing & Manufacturing Co.'s new chemi- 
cal product division. . . . Stromberg- 
er, LaVene, McKenzie for Buitoni 
Foods advertising in 11 Western states. 

J. M. Mathes, one of the earliest 
boosters of radio among New York ad 
men. died this week. 

NETWORKS 

Of the 100 leading national ad- 
vertisers (in 1956), 45 are cur- 
rently using network radio. Here's 
the list: 
P&G 

General Motors 
Colgate-Palmolive 
General Foods 
General Electric 

[Please turn to page 68) 



64 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 






■ 



WSK 



^Jbk^-A 



;F*4'^» 



^JLi '1 






M 

/-5-A 



the more you compare programming, 
ratings, coverage, or costs per 
thousand — the more you'll prefer 

WAVE Radio 
WAVE-TV 



LOUISVILLE 



NBC AFFILIATES 



NBC SPOT SALES, EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 






i 

■ 



' 



\ 



There's more fo Florida! 

To be sun-, living is easy , . . so eat ■ that 6, k to I orida 

annually. More important, during 1956 2,800 neu (ami ■ ••' moved 

here to Inc. Keeping pace, 287 neu industrial plants set up simp in the 

first nine months oj the year alone. 

There's Jacksonville, for instance 

...huh of a $1,660,000,000 market u here population has in, r. 

faster than the national average. . . where more than SO stories oj neti 
insurance buildings have pone up. . . where 600 manufacturing enteri 
pour out products from paper haps to diesel locomotives. Is one industrialist 
put it. "/ should have moved my plant to Jacksom die much sooner. 

f*/lff FF tMmMmw'm f capsules the market foi you, covering 

277,000 television families in (>7 counties the equivalent ■ oj all 

the tv homes in Florida." In the metropolitan Jacksonville area measured 
hy ARB, powerful WMBR-TV delivers five and a half tunes the aiei. 
total-week audience of its competition'. 




Channel t, Jacksonville WMIilHN 
Operated by The Washington Post Broadcast Division 
Represented by CBS Television v 



um 




m 

i V 



Chrysler Corp. 

Ford 

\m<ii<an Home Products 
General Mills 
Gillette 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Lever Brothers 
Bristol-Myers 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco 
Pillsbury Mills 
Kellogg 
RCA 

Standard Brands 

Swift 

E. I. DuPont de Nemours 

Quaker Oats 

Armour & Co. 

Sterling Drug 

P. Lorillard 

Scott Paper 

Coca-Cola 

Miles Labs. 

National Biscuit 

Warner-Lambert 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco 

Firestone Tire & Rubber 

S. C. Johnson & Son 

Nestle 

American Motors 

Corn Products 

Joseph Schlitz Brewing 

Studebaker-Packard 

Texas Co. 
Reynolds Metals 
Best Foods 
Chesebrough-Pond's 
Norwich Pharmacal 
Doubleday & Co. 
Atlantis Sales Corp. 
Admiral Corp. 

(See SPONSOR-SCOPE, page 10, 



for a breakdown bj individual net- 
works of the leading national advertis- 
ers using radio.) 

"Trade your mirror for a win- 
dow" was the advice Louis Haus- 
man, CBS v.p. for advertising and 
promotion, gave the American 
Women in Radio and Television 
at their Convention last week. 

Hausman told the professional wo- 
men that they have "lost touch" with 
the average American woman, and that 
they are "too independent, too secure, 
too individual and too broad in inter- 
est" to be like or to understand her. 

He suggested that AWRTs experts 
on the average woman should "seek 
out their subject in her native habitat" 
—supermarkets, churches, in low- 
priced cars, resorts and dresses, etc. 

New appointments: Dean Shaflf- 

ner, latest ABC staffer to make the 
trek over to NBC, will join NBC TV 
on 20 May as director of sales plan- 
ning. Shaffner was v.p. in charge of 
sales development and research for 
ABC Radio. . . . Chalmers Dale has 
been appointed assistant manager of 
the film services department at CBS 
TV. . . . E. Charles Straus has been 
assigned to the newly-created post of 
director of talent and casting at CBS 
TV, Hollywood. ... A. Rohert Bona- 
gura has joined the sales staff at CBS 




"If it weren't for us KRIZ Phoenix 
account executives, you air person- 
alities would be permanently sus- 
taining." 



or. 



Radio. . . . Louis J. Riggio, whilom 
partner in Hilton & Riggio, has gone 
with CBS Radio as a special consultant 
on sales development. . . . Louis M. 
Marey has resigned as director of sales 
development and presentations at NBC 
TV to join Sylvester I Pat I Weaver's 
new Program Service in an executive 
sales capacity. 

Network program notes: Walter 
Winchell will return to ABC TV next 
fall in a new series. Format will pre- 
sent Winchell as a storyteller and will 
dramatize fictionalized versions of 
news stories. Time slot for the pro- 
grams has not been set as yet. . . . 
Giant Step l CBS-TV I which is being 
dropped by General Mills on 29 May. 
1. rings the 1956-57 season's quiz show 
casualty list up to eight so far. . . . 
Those Whiting Girls will be back on 
television this summer taking over the 
Monday night 9-9:30 spot on CBS TV 
for General Foods and P&G. 




RADIO STATIONS 

Riding the radio comeback trail, 
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 
has appointed a national radio 
sales manager, Perry B. Bascom. 
Bascom has been eastern sales 
manager for WBC since June 
I 956. 

\\ estinghouse radio stations include: 
WBZ-WBZA, Boston and Springfield; 
KDKA. Pittsburgh; KYW, Cleveland, 
WOWO. Fort Wayne; WIND, Chica- 
go; and KEX, Portland, Ore. 

"Radio will he no worse than sec- 
ond best" in agency billings in the 
West In 1902— was the prediction of 
Kevin Sweeney. RAB president, in an 
address before the Western States Ad- 
vertising Agency Association conven- 
tion last week. 

Sweeney also predicted that the se- 
lection of specific times announcements 
are to run will become "the responsi- 
bility of radio stations" just as the 
page on which advertisements are to 
run is now principally the responsi- 
bility of individual newspapers. 

WWVA, Wheeling-Steubenville. in a 
presentation to New York timebuyers 
last week, hit hard at competing media. 
Theme: "no newspaper, magazine or 
tv station can match WWVA's pene- 
tration" in its area. . . . WVNJ, New- 
ark, which switched to "Great Albums 
of Music"" format last January, finds 
the new programing has increased its 
audience, upped the Hooper rating and 
brought in more national advertisers. 
The new format, which does not use 
disk jockey personalities, can be par- 
tially measured by requests for 
\\ \ NJ's programing booklets — 30.000 
to date. 

WTL, St. Louis, has become an ABC 
affiliate. . . . WITH, Baltimore, will 
carry the Brooklyn Dodger night 
games with Melody Club Wines spon- 
soring. . . . KXXL. Monterey. Calif- 
is now KIDD. 

Notes on people: Ed Paul is now 

national sales manager at W F.RE. 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



Cleveland. . . . Jim Coryell has joined 
the sales staff al vVQAM, Miami. . , . 
George llobkiik is now program <li- 
rectoi i"i K-AC1 . I!i\ erside, Calif. .. . 
It«»l> l.lo\«l has been named produc- 
tion manager Foi KNX-CPRN, Los \n- 
geles. . . knit Burkhaii has joined 
\\u\\l. Miami, a- program director. 
. . . Robert C Burris has been a|>- 
pointed general managei <>l KSAN, 
San Francisco. 

TV STATIONS 

I h< Corinthian Broadcasting 
Corp. has been Bet up to manage 

the J. II. Wbitne) A Co. t\ and 
radio stations. 

These include: KOTV, Tulsa; 
KG1 I TV, Galveston; WISH & \\ Ml 
l\. Indianapolis; an. I \\ \\l. & 
\\ WI.-IA. Fort Worth. 

Directors and officers of Corinthian 
include three partners of J. II. \\ hitne) 
8 Co.: Walter Y Tha\er. chairman <>f 
the hoard: ('. \\ rede I'elei >me\ er. 

president; and Robert F. Bryan, sec- 
retary -treasurer. 

Corinthian's basic purpose, Peters- 
meyer said, will he to provide an ex- 

( han-e of ideas anion" its stations. 
Day-to-da) operation will remain un- 
der the direction of the local managers. 
Petersmeyer will have a small stalT of 

no more than seven people in New 
^tork whose function will he to stimu- 
late idea- rather than dictate policy 
from the home office. 

\- president, Petersmeyer, who has 
been directing the alTairs of KOTV, 
Inc.. from lulsa, will now make his 

headquarters in New i oik. 

General managers of the Corinthian 
Stations will serve on the policy com- 
mittee of which Petersmeyer will be 
chairman. 

Other ke\ appointments at Corinthi- 
an are: George G. Jacobs, director of 
engineering; Charles II. Smith, direc- 
tor of research: and Johnston F. Nor- 
throp, assistant to the president. 

Tv applications: Between 22 and 27 
April one construction permit was 
granted, three applications for new sta- 
tions were filed and one new station 
took to the air. 

Construction permit went to W HDH. 
Inc. for Channel i. Boston, permit al- 
lows 65.2 kw visual. 

Applications were made h\ : Cv Blu- 
menthal. Arlington, Va. for Channel 
2. Terre Haute. Ind.. 100 kw visual, 
with tower 990 feet above average ter- 



rain, plant 1483,622 

cost -i. 'mi. i; Marvin Ki 

( I i tela .i~i iii-. New ^ "ik. N "> 

foi t hannel 7, Si < loud Mum.. 1.8 kw 
\ isual, h iih towei I l<> feel abov< i 

i.i rain, plant |90, 1 26, yeai Ij opei 
ating i osl $1 17,500; and Mali o 
atres, Memphis, l"i < hannel I 1 1, < !ol 
umbus, 0., 23.] ku visual, with towei 
208 feel above averagi terrain, plant 
1131 ,597, j earl} opei ating cosl I 
000. 

New station on the ail h as WSOl 
TV, Charlotte, N. C, < hannel 9, affili- 
ated with NBC TV, also some \l'>< I \ 

-how 9. 

W MlO. ( 1 1 1 < ago, in i onna t ion h ith 

\m thwestei n I niversit) is pet il 

tng on a six-week symposium !"i coloi 
t\ starting _' I June-. . . . Plane for 
merging \\ <.K. Corp. I WCI! \\l & 
TV, Buffalo) into Transcontinenl I < lie 
vision Corp. I W Rl M l'\ . Rochester, 
Y i. and ")<)'r owner ol Shenandoah 
Vallej Broadcasting) have been ap- 
proved l>\ stockholders ol both firms. 

\\ WL-TV, New Orleans, will lake to 
the air on I Vugusl as an inter< ••nun i- 
ed primai \ affiliate ol CBS l\. . . . 



K \IW I \ . I 

roduced in 
with nine ol the . luthern ' 

fornia univ< i Shad 

days ii \\ < I \ . 

Pulse 
ratii 
Ii - a sinj l< station i 

I OCUS Oil pel -on.ilitii - : I ,< in g . 

Bowe i- the new produi lion 

al Wll* I \. Hartford, < onn. . 

(.< orge Rice ill take •(•• 

directoi and ^ ale Roe 
tional spot sales Foi Ki .< > I \ 

San I Robert <>. Pax- 

son has been appointed sales mar 

••I K I IN. Omaha 

Reorganization ol the manage- 
ment of Southland Industries 

(\\n\i fl WOAI-TV, Mn \n- 

t mi i<> ) wink- out this wayi 

HiiLih llallf. |i .. new < bainnan of 
the board ; lame- \|. ( Raines, ; 
and general mana 
i \ . vice president and tn 
Charles L. [effers, vice president; 
Howard IJ. I!i am h, se< retar) . ITi< 



it's KSAN in San Francisco 

PROVEN MOST POPULAR WITH NE6R0 LISTENERS A 
YEAR AFTER YEAR* >•«««•« 



Is Your 
Best Buy... 
Because 



1m 



Goes Where 
280,000 



KSAN 

SAN HtANOSCO \ 



\ Where 



fc\ Negro 
/Market 



Listeners 

specific proof of all KSAN claims to fame, 
contact Stars National, Tracy Moore, or 

WRITE, WIRE, PHONE KSAN 

1111 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, MA 1-8171 



SPONSOR 



4 M \Y l ( ).-)7 



69 



* 



Montgomery's No.l 

(says Hooper) is 

WRMA 

Serving 200,000 Negroes 

Oct.-Nov. 1956 Hooper 
Av. share 7AM-6PM 

WRMA 27.6% 

Second station, 21.4% 

'Signed oft 4:4SPM during survey 

Exclusive Market 

The only Negro station 

in a Central Alabama 

area with 53% Negro population 

WRMA 

Montgomery, Ala. 

i Judd Sparling, Commercial Manager 

Joseph Hershey McGillvra, 

National Representatives 



WWRL NEW YORK CITY 







C/V 



rVW^L 



'Gregory Wheatle 
305 Convent Ave. 
New York, N.Y. 

WWRL S PERSONALITIES SELL 
more merchandise for sponsors by: 
Delivering the largest NEGRO 
AUDIENCE for your product. . . . 
Supporting your schedule with a 
barrage of CONSUMER ADS. . . . 

MERCHANDISING CREWS work 
full time in Supermarkets and drug 
stores for you. . . . FREE. . . . 
LOW SELLING COST of 12c per 

thousand. . . . 

call or write 



Woodside 77, New York City 
Tel — DEfender 5-1600 



- BEST FOR NEGRO PROGRAMS 



FILM 

Station bartering of time for pro- 
graming, while not a big factor in 
film sales, has given rise to at least one 
firm dealing solely in that kind of 
business. 

Name of the firm is Time Merchants. 
Inc., which boasts a lavish suite in 
New York City's Plaza Hotel and is 
headed by Richard Rosenblatt. Among 
those connected with the firm who are 
known in the broadcasting business are 
Harry Maizlish, former president of 
KFWB, Los Angeles, who heads up 
West Coast operations and William 
Weintraub, Jr.. in charge of the East- 
ern office. 

The firm is about nine months old 
and Rosenblatt claims he has orders 
for time from agencies and advertisers 
totaling no less than $10 million. Based 
on past performance, he said, he ex- 
pects to place about 25' < of that figure. 

Rosenblatt describes TMI as an 
agent for film distributors seeking to 
unload time they acquired from sta- 
tions in exchange for programing. He 
says about 75' '< of the deals are made 
with features and the remainder for 
s\ ndicated film. 

The TMI chief was understandablv 
cagey about releasing names of cli- 
ents who have bought time through 
him but he said that one of the biggest 
air advertisers in the business will 
"test" the use of bartered time with a 
budget of about $50,000 during the 
summer — that is, the advertiser will 
see if the time periods he has request- 
ed can be delivered. 

Rosenblatt franklv admits pattern- 
ing his operation after that of Mattv 
Fox. who sold RKO features to stations 
in return for time that was turned over 
to International Latex. 

Rosenblatt's deals van in nature but 
a 15% commission on the time placed 
is common. In some cases, it is under- 
stood, he buys the time from distribu- 
tors and then resells it at whatever 
price he can get from advertisers. 

Is bartered time worth it? Rosen- 
blatt maintains the advertiser can get 
bartered time at from 33 to 50' < of 
the station's earned rate, including 
package discounts. 

One of the biggest small market 
regional deals in recent years was 
pulled off bv Gross-Krasne with the 
sale of The 0. Henry Playhouse to 

Faultless Starch Co. in 42 markets. 
Ii\e of these areas were described 



as "prime" markets and the others as 
secondary. First airing is slated for 
2 May. ' 

The new sale lifts the total of mar- 
kets sold for the show to 187. 

Two king-size feature film sales 

have been recently announced. 

The MGM library has been sold to 
WNAC-TV, Boston, for an estimated 
$2 million while AAP has sold its 
Warner Bros, package to WREC-TV, 
Memphis, for a reported $1 million. 

FINANCIAL 

Following are first quarter reports 
for some of the major air media 
users. 

Chrysler sales rose to $1,150,723,712 
as against #742.349.267 for the first 
(juarter of 1956. Net earnings went 
up 3729* to $46,545,521 as compared 
h. $10,905,722. 

General Motors sales were up to 
$3,076,974,030 compared to $3,064.- 
582.957 in the first quarter of 1956. 
Earnings, however, were down with 
$261,357,742 as against $285,593,355. 

Westinghouse Eleetric Corp.'s re- 
covery is noted in record sales of 
$475,686,000 for the first nuarter of 
1957. Last vear's sales were $225,366,- 
000. Net earnings went to $14,198,000 
in contrast to the $18,575,000 loss dur- 
ing the same period in 1956. Loss was 
due to prolonged strike. 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merril Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 



70 



Tues. 


Tues. 


Net 


Stock 23 April 


30 April 


Change 


\ eio York Stork Exchange 




AB-PT 23% 


23 1 ;; 


+ % 


AT&T 177 :( , 


177% 




\\i'o 6% 


6% 




CBS "A" 34% 


34 


- % 


Columbia Pic. 17% 


17-, 


+ % 


1 of u '- 19% 


18% 


- % 


Paramount 34- 


;;■- 




RCA 33% 


36% 


+3H 


Storer l'H T s 


27% 


-1* 


JOili-Fox -2<rw 


27% 


+ 1% 


Warner Br<>~. ii\ 


24 


+ % 


Westinghouse 59% 


59' s 


- % 


American Slock Exchange 




Ulied Artists \% 


3% 


+ M 


( ',&( . Super 's 


' B 




DuMonl Labs. •">', 


5 


- % 


Guild Films 3% 




- % 


\T\ 8% 


8% 


+ % 


SPONSOR 


• 4 MAI 


• 1957 




air THE MIWLE WEST 
rut PEOPLE CALLED / 




Near the peak of the big snow storm 'March 25 over 400 
calls came into the KFAB newsroom Most of the calls were 
from Superintendents and Principals of schools throughout 
the area. They asked KFAB to get No school today in- 
formation to some 400 000 school children in Nebrosko and 
Western Iowa The same service was rendered to business 
firms and factories, many of which closed for the day. 
Whether it's in the field of Public Service or service to the 
advertiser, KFAB produces results unmatched by any other 
media. 

Get the full story on the new KFAB from Peters Griffin and 
Woodward or get the facts from KFAB Sales Manager. 
E. R. Morrison. 




GRADE 8 CONTOURS 



76,701 MORE TV HOMES 

From PITTSBURGH to HARRISBURQ 



ARB proves you get 76,701 more TV 
homes when you buy WFBG-TV, Altoona, 
in combination with Pittsburgh — the best 
combination of stations in the area ! Less 
waste, less duplication, more mileage for 
your TV dollar. ARB proves— from sign 
on to sign off, seven days a week— 
WFBG-TV delivers average ratings 30.1% 
greater than Johnstown; 71.4% more 
quarter-hour firsts. Ask BLAIR to show 
you the ARB Altoona Coverage Study, 
March 1956; and ARB, November 1956. 




WFBG-TV 

ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 



ONLY BASIC CBS-TV STATION SERVING THE AREA 




Channel 10 
ABC-TV • NBC-TV 

Represented by BLAIR-TV 



operated by: Radio and Television Dlv. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM <TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM »TV, Blnghamton, N. Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa./wFBG-AM .TV, Altoona, Pa./WNHC-AM • FM »TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 
National Sales Office, 4-85 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 



72 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



C«*rrl|ht IM7 
»P0N»OR PUBLICATIONS INC 



it haft happening in I irmm 

that affect* tioiu 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



4 may Of considerable significance to advertisers in general i- 1 1 ■ • I . S, Supreme 

Court's agreement this week to decide whether .1 parodj <ii i copyrighted »<>ik 
violates the copyright la\\-. 

Parodies are common in commercial jin I p to now, 1 1 j * - lowi 

have invested the copyright owner with complete control ovei .rk. 

The case coming before the top tribunal began when Loew's, In cted to ! 

Benny's parody of the motion picture Gaslight. \ I 5. I ourl of Vppeals' ruling upheld 
Loew's ((intention thai a parody or burlesque i- no different from ani other copy* 
right infringement. 

The high court will listen to arguments when it reconvenes in the fill. 

This week's hearings on independent program packagers maj not be the I < < 

network study committee's last such attempt to gel information from reluctant 
of the t\ industry . 

The wording of th»> FCC announcement of the Bubpoenas indicated thai oth< 
follow- even though it appeared that producers of film -Imw- were the particular thorn 

in the side of the committee's chairman. Dean Roscoe Barrow. 



The FCC is convinced that its present multiple ownership rales ;ire ;t -ullii ienl 
safeguard against monopoly and thus is granting another h station to a network. 

So the FCC told Sen. Thomas Hennings (D, Mo. . who. .m_< -red l>\ i! ■ 
men! of St Louis channel 11 to CBS over Beveral competitors, directed a roster 
questions at the commission. 

Senator Hennings sought to draw a parallel l>\ a question along this line: 

Aren't the networks, now being studied for possible violation of anti-trust law*, 
in a similar position to motion picture people when th< FO d< Ferred UW 
for broadcast facilities on the ground they were Mill under anti-trusi indictment? 

Rejoined the FCC: There's no similarity whatever. The networks haven't been con- 
victed of anything, and investigations aren't to be equated with convictioi 

The FCC has set 3 June as the deadline for the submission <>t arguments on 
its decision to substitute the Craven plan for the t>. table of allocations. 

After polishing up the Craven plan and adopting it b) a I -3 vote, the FCl 
so-called rulemaking proceeding-. 

To the Craven plan have been added specific protections to uhf. 

No applications for vbf drop-ins will l>e entertained that are within 75 mile- 
of a uhf transmitter, unless there is ahead] a ^ lit thai dose. Or, if the principal 
served by a u is not getting service already hom two or i 

The FCC will have a complete analysis <»t dear channd and tkywave prw 

ings for the commission to consider on 22 May. 

In revealing this to this week's Senate daytime hearii g, FO general counsel Warren 
Baker said daytime must he considered an issue in thi 

Arguments will he heard 3 June on the FCl 's proposed ban on tv translator -t..- 
tioii9 in anv place where a regular tv station is operating. 

The FCC's reason: Translators might retard development of local tv service. 



4 may 1957 



73 



GETTING THE MOST Fl 



k 



Snagged" by a 
Faulty Film Situation ? 

If so, you've a right to be "hopping mad" — 
especially if picture "smog," inflexible film pres- 
entations and high operating costs are blocking 
your progress. Better do something about it. 



<£*## 




**#J| 



74 




JR FILM DOLLAR... 



#"*## 




Can You Answer 



to all 



these Questions? 

1. Does your present film equipment give you a snow- 
free picture, approaching the live quality that adver- 
tisers want ? 



2. Does it assure low operating cost at the same time? 

3. Does your film system provide for varied program 
fare to hold viewer interest ? 



— If your answer is "no" to any of these questions, 
let us show you how to plan your system to get 
these desired advantages. See your RCA Broadcast 
Representative. Have him acquaint you with RCA's 
comprehensive TV Film Facilities — for getting bet- 
ter pictures and lower operating costs for both 
Color and Monochrome. 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, N J 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Ltd , Montreal 





ONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



75 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



4 MAY Current luncheon-lable wisecracking about a Madison Avenue agency with a habit 

bponsor^uca™™ iNo. of ,,u > in " * em at th e P^k and seeing the ratings droop: 

"Well, there's another one that got the kiss of death." 



One of the biggest unpaid bundles left on an agency's doorstep by a tv ad- 
vertiser involves the Roto Broil Corp. and Product Services, Inc. 

Roto Broil, a PSI client, filed a voluntary petition for an arrangement. 
The debtor's schedule of liabilities listed PSI as creditor in the amount of S275.132. 
Roto proposes to pay 100% of the claims over five years. 



To Madison Avenue the prize question of the week was the one that a woman stock- 
holder tossed to E. H. Little, Colgate chairman-president: 

"Why, Mr. Little, do you fire so many presidents?" 

Little's explanation was that he didn't fire them without talking it over with members 
i >f his executive committee. 



Suddenly the adverb "suddenly" is becoming a fixation with copywriters. 

Plymouth was the first big enthusiast with "Suddenly. It's 1960." Now there's "Sud- 
denly soap is old fashioned" (Dove). "Suddenly . . . everybody's more efficient" (Sound 
Scriber), even "Suddenly it's the Hi Lo's" (singers). 

Suddenly, meantime, Plymouth has abandoned "suddenlv." 



Add rea«ons why tv program costs continue to soar: The salaries of freelance 
directors on the big dramatic shows have caught up with the stagehands' cut. 

Practically all the hour dramas are now directed by a tight circle of freelancers whose 
base pay runs around $2,000 per show. 



Here's one of the niftiest pieces of tit-for-tat in a long time: 

A top agency man left his alma mater to go with one of its clients as ad manager. 
The client thereupon said, in effect. "Get rid of your agency stock: you can't serve two mas- 
ters at the same time." 

Confronted with this, the agency made a cash settlement with its alumnu< pretty much 
at fire-sale prices. 

Last chapter: The agency's billings from that client somehow have dropped 
from $12 million to $5 million. 

This week's award for fancy steering goes to the Madison Avenue agency which, 
while making a show pitch to a client, was told another agency already had suggested 
the same program series. 

The spokesman for the pitching agency paused but a second, then stalled: 

"Oh, we're not sure this show is the right thing for you. The stars look good, but the 

format is sort of weak. 

"Now — the same producer's got a show two of our clients had to drop a year ago, even 

though it rated very well. Let's come back and talk about that show in a week." 

76 SPONSOR • 4 MAY 195 



DETROIT'S AIR SPLURGE 

[Continued from page 29) 

,-nl studies into whal motivates 
buj i are. < me r« enl stud) 
bj Social Research, Inc. for 7 he ( 'hi- 
■ I ribune, titled "' Automobiles: 
\\ h.ii I hej VIean I" \mci u ans, i ites 
the following motivations l"i cat own- 
ership: I 1 • 1 o acquire and demon- 
strate I'.uiH ipation in societ) ; (2) I o 
extend one's life boundai ies : (3) I o 
acquire a sense "I powei ; (4) I <> ac- 
< omplish transportation ; (5) I o feel 
pride "I -kill and mastei y; (6) I o 
it adull prerogatives and capa- 
bilities; I 7 i To demonstrate status; 
Vs .in outlet for aggression. 
I .. i ate] to -in h a w ide \ ai ietj "I 
motivations, mam advertising themes 
cannot stand alone. Jusl the theme of 
dependability and durability appeals 
onl) to the most reserved people, the 
Tribune stud) showed. Jusl stressing 
economy i reates a "cheap" reputation, 
lu-t safet) appeals onl) to people with 
extreme fears. "Cars thai are narrow- 
ly defined, says this report, "either 
because "I extreme features or single- 
minded advertising definite!) limit 
themselves. \ car can sell itself t<> 
different people b) presenting different 
facets ol it- pereonalit) . 

In the earl) days of automotive ad- 
vertising, the single-minded ad theme 
ua- mechanical. Hove) Hagerman, 
new a.e. for Pontiac at MacManus, 
John & Vdams, writing in a recenl is- 
sue ol lutomotive \ews, recalls the 
copywriting battle between Chevrolet 
ami Plymouth at the time when Plym- 
outh switched to all-steel bodies. "We 
took the aggressive," says Hagerman, 
who was then writing for Chevrolet, 
"and ran ads saying: 'Steel \l<me Is 
Not Enough.' ' Plymouth replied b) 
sending an entourage around the coun- 
try with an elephant which would walk 
on the tops of it- cars to demonstrate 
he strength of construction. Chevro- 
then ran an ad which said: "If 
Your Elephant Wants to Ride on Top. 
It's Ml Right With Chevrolet." 

While durabilit) and horsepower 
ind roadabilit) still pla\ their part in 
mto advertising today, there i- no 
onger the single-minded devotion to 
"nuts and bolts." St) le was bound to 
nter the picture, even discounting the 
lanting of ads toward women, luto- 
lotirc \eus recently quoted a Detroit 
desman as saying: "I spend more 
une in m\ car than I do in m\ living 



America's most 

copied radio station! 




ART GOW SHOW 

PAT GAY SHOW 

DENVER AT NIGHT 

STARR YELLAND'S PARTY LINE 

KLZ-Radio is proud of the opportunity to make this 
contribution . . . making Radio even a better buy 
than ever! 

KLZ is mU than 

a radio station 
KLZ is a selling force! 



CBS 
IN DENVER 




KATZ 

REPRESENTED 



PONSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



77 



room. When I bu) an automobile, up- 
holster) and interior trim are mighty 
important items." As for exterior 
trim, its current importance is reflect- 
ed in the battle between steel and 
aluminum companies to supply it to 
auto companies. 

What has shifted emphasis from 
"nuts and bolts" to styling? "Psycho- 
logically, Americans are reaching for 
new esthetic and luxury levels in their 
purchases," explains Dr. Dichter, of 
the Institute for Motivational Research. 
"Prosperih lui-~ satisfied the utilih 



needs of many American families. 
Higher prices of cars have created a 
»uilt feeling which must be eliminated 
b) appeals directed at cultural and 
emotional needs. Distinctions in col- 
or, line, appurtenances become more 
important than the actual mechanics 
of the car. Appeals to status and pres- 
tige help assuage guilt feelings con- 
cerning the price." 

More advertising dollars: Discon- 
tinuance of factory-dealer advertis- 
ing co-op funds frees motor companies 
from obligation of sharing the pot with 



COVERAGE 



for 



WBIR-TV covers more than 
50 prosperous counties in 
East Tennessee, Kentucky 
and North Carolina. 





HEIGHT 



WBIR-TV's antenna tow- 
ers 991 feet above the 
average terrain. 



for 



POWER 

WBIR-TV is one of the 
nation's most powerful sta- 
tions operating on a full 
316,000 watts. 



CALL YOUR KATZ MAN 
for availabilities 




WBIR-TY 

Serving Tennessee's 2nd Market 

noniLLElfl. 

CHANNEL I U 




local dealers. While dealer media re- 
quests are still considered, the adver- 
tising strategy and final decisions on 
where it is spent lie with the factory 
and its agency. This could have played 
a part in this year's television buving 
which already exceeds the 857 mil- 
lion spent in 1956 by about $15 mil- 
lion. 

New buying strategy: There are 
signs in Detroit of a departure in con- 
cept, and some companies are starting 
to buy "the medium that could only 
sell soap" like the soap companies do. 
This is pointed up by some buvs I Ford 
and Buick, for example) where they 
will share shows with alternate spon- 
sors or even participate. "Safety" and 
cost-per-1,000 appear to be getting 
more consideration. 

All of these factors have perhaps 
played some role in the heavy net t\ 
buj ing. Some of them may have in- 
fluenced the Ford radio buy on CBS. 
One thing that surely underlies it all 
is that 1057 will be a highly competi- 
tive year in the passenger car business. 
In May. Studebaker is coming out with 
an economy model — not a midget, but 
a full-size, standard model — to sell at 
$1776 list. This fall, the new Edsel 



tf* POWER 
^LUMBER 
AGRICULTURE^ 



;2te 



.S- 



£ ^Gfi, 



Sfico. 



Are 



°k& 



'No 
KlCH 



L +RG 



Jre 8o n - 



Est 



Go;v 



Ce Of Cr 



RT 



ClTy 



ar 8es, 



an<] 



Ni 



5<h 



"^rfc 






of 

2nd 



^eo. 



°<-<hy 



^cifj c 



C BS \odio 

5,000 WATrS-l280KC 



EUGENE. OREGON 

HSAA/r MOR£ FACTS P 

-COA/rACr WSED £ CO. 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 



will entei the field. Meanwhile Ford 
i- engaged in it- perennial Btruggle to 
top Chevrolet, while Plymouth la out 
aftei both "I them. Once all t\ shows 
are bought, it is reasonable t" believe 
ihat the auto companies will turn theii 
attention i<» spol t\. spol radio, and 
quite possibl) I" more network radio. 
\BC Radio reports it- Spring business 
in. in auto advertisers al aboul $520,- 

000 net. 

\\ hile automoti\ e spol acl i\ ii\ has 

nol been too hea^ j .1- \ et this \ eat . ii 

uusl be remembered thai the hoped- 

foi Spring upsurge in new car sales 

has not developed either, although all 

the Big I line IkhI a good firsl quartei . 

Pontiac used a fairl) heavy schedule 

uliii spol in Februar) and March. 

Hdsmohile i- hitting some markets 

1 Spring 1 .ulin and l\ campaign. 

[I \ Thesaurus' Laurence II <•//, radio 

iackage i- heing sponsored In Dodge 

1 nd Dodge dealer- in aboul 62 mar- 

Ford Institutional i- aboul ti> 
tart a 6-week radio campaign. The 
raditional use of spol In Detroit has 
Iwa) - followed a 60' . Autumn and 
• »', Spring pattern with the remain- 
rig 10'. scattered through the year. 
What of the other media? The Bu- 



1 eau ol \d\ ertising Vmei \. w - 

paper Publishers Vss lorta 

passengei 1 at ad> ertisin 
papers ofl 18.1 ' I laal yeai froi 
($126 million in 1955; (103 million 
in 1956 1. Publishers Information Bu- 
reau reports thai magazines 
farm and Sundaj supplements 
ceived $6,56 I. .">.'! I in Januai j and I 1 
ruarj this yeai .1- againsl -."..I II,] 18 
for the co] responding month- in I • 

a drop uf aboul $1.5 million. 

Perhaps some ol this monej i- be 
ing re-directed into aii media, particu- 
lai U into those telr\ ision buys for fall. 
Perhaps -till more w ill go to radio and 
spol radio and spol t\ . Bui it does nol 
mean thai broadcasters 1 an be com- 
placent aboul their grow ing good foi 
tune. I he auto indust 1 j like it- ow n 
product is a highK mobile one Flexi- 
bility in advertising is one of the things 
it was sti i\ ing foi when it dropped its 
factory-dealer co-op funds. \n<l now 
it has thai flexibility. 

\- foi the print media, they 1 annol 
be expected to accepl a I..-- in adver- 
tising revenue without a battle. The 
newspaper- have already joined in .1 
drive to counter the inroads made bj 
television. That i- apparent from the 



it \ \ r \ 

■ ■ i 

in. I vehi • trill hard!) 

-111. I! 

hard thi 

in win. h the) 1 \ 11t11.1l 

. lush it\ 1- threatened the 1 

. 0I01 teli I 1 • 

I In- Saturday I 
nearl) v '» million worth 

vertiaii Lij 

Look, in .11 1 . - '. million. 

How w ill the) t 

swer ma) lie in the cum 

/ he Gallaghei />'< 7 

sen ice f.>r advertising and puhlial 
utives published in \> rw N ..1 . 
Bernard P. Callaghi • I P01 trail 
ol .1 ( ompetitoi in ["rouble* 1 - the 
title of tin- report, 

w 1 ile-: "\.-w and \ igorous - 

promotion campaigns In the n 
are in order. Strong point-: l.i- 
memor) impai 1 ..f the printed ad; 

audited 1 in illation : Bound advert 
readership research; varied edit 

product-. . . . / .' ifwuld 

lx- made to •» , ll automoti\ 
an the value 0} magazine advertis- 
ing." ^ 



TV lit Bie&vio- 
otQj i nland Ca£I{jo > au€u 





u 



■ 





•Baau^MBa-TVa^ui^ 



Poul H. Roymer Co., Notional Representative 



SfcNSOR • 4 MAY 1957 



79 



INVEST 




DlDLARS 



WHERE THEY BRING 
LARGER DIVIDENDS 



The latest NIELSEN SURVEY proves 
that KTBS-TV, CHANNEL 3 gives you 
more .... more TV homes .... 
reaches more of these TV homes 
MONTHLY and WEEKLY .... de- 
livers more for your money. 

316,400 HOMES in KTBS-TV AREA 
give you a bonus of 31,900 homes over 
Sta'ion B, according to A. C. Nielsen 
Co., world's largest statistical and 
ratirg organization. 

157,980 TELEVISION HOMES in 
KTBS-TV AREA, a bonus of 13,120 
over Station B, is shown by the Nielsen 
Survey. 

136,860 HOMES REACHED MONTH- 
LY by KTBS-TV, a bonus of 6,740 over 
Station B, proven by Nielsen. 

131,870 HOMES REACHED WEEKLY 
by KTBS-TV, a bonus of 5,120 over 
Station B is shown by Nielsen. 

KTBS-TV with its maximum power is 
the place to be ... . there's more 
to see on Channel 3 . . . . and more 
people see itl 



KTBS*7l/ 

CHANNEL 



SHREVEP0RT 
LOUISIANA 

E. NEWTON WRAY, President & Gen. Mgr. 

NBC and ABC 




Represented by 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



i 



Reps at work 




Howard (Mac) McFadden, NBC Radio Spot Sales, thinks that 
"some agencies are still setting up spot schedules by a national 
formula, rather than on the basis of individual markets. A Wednes- 
day-Thursday-Fridav schedule for a food advertiser in many markets 
is fine — but elsewhere its effectiveness max he lost because the peak 
shopping day in one market is 
not necessarily the same as the 
next." Mac points out that spot 
radio can't he scheduled 1>\ a rigid 
formula. Flexibility is its keynote; 
the selection of markets is left to 
the advertiser, who uses only those 
which he needs. "He may hit 
hard with saturation for a short 
period or establish product or 
service identification through long- 
er association with a personality 
or program. He knows his adver- 
tising message and product impression can reach everyone, every- 
where, every time of day and day of week. Starting and quitting 
times, food and department store hours, automobile traffic peaks and 
other important factors vary from market to market. No magic 
formula can give the right answer for all markets, hut vour spot 
sales rep can — especially if he has an active research department." 



Raymond F. Henze, Jr., John H. Pearson. Inc.. New York, com- 
ments: "Many clients are missing a large potential buying audience 
by using an outmoded theorv of market selection. Frequently ad- 
vertisers will choose cities for a campaign based upon their ranking 
as a Standard Metropolitan Area. This method of evaluation 

doesn't consider a station s total 
coverage. There are a number of 
situations where a tv station is lo- 
cated in a small city but actually 
covers several nearby small cities 
all adding up to a very substantia 
market. These areas frequently 
have a total population much 
greater than some cities or areas 
ranking high in SMA. The SMA 
will always be inaccurate for tv. 
\( cording to the Bureau of the 
Budget, an SMA is an integrated 
social and economic unit with considerable contact between the cen- 
tral citv and the remainder of the metropolitan area. But the impor- 
tant common bond is tv coverage which applies to smaller citv groups 
a- well as the Standard Metropolitan Area. A ranking method based 
upon the number of tv homes within a station's sphere of influence 
must be developed for buying accuracy and full advertising impact. 




80 



SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 




In the first rating taken since the station went on the air — 

WRAL-TV WALKS OFF WITH 24 OUT OF 32 TOP SHOWS 



It always looks easy for a champion! The Tar Heel- of North Carolina walked <»ll with the national 
basketball championship. \nd WRAL-TV walked off with the Februarj WW> taken in R 
jusl weeks alter it went on the air. 

WRAL-TV has proved itself to be the mosl importanl television station in this pari ol the South. 
ARB says it has twice the Raleigh-area audience as the next station copping 24 of the top 32 shows. 

And watch the next ratings! 



PICK A CHAMPION TO WIN! 




CHANNEL 



clinic 



H-R Representatives, Inc. 



RALEIGH 



P 



NORTH CAROLINA 



fONSOR • 4 MAY 1951 



81 




There's Only One! 

Of course, we know there is more 
than one radio station in the 
West... but the truth is, there's 
only ONE that covers the West... 
best! And you need only one to 
reach — and sell — the entire West- 
ern Market! 

COVERAGE — Only one, KOA-Radio, 
covers the big Western Market like the 
big Western sky . ..reaching 3'2 million 
Westerners in 302 counties of 12 states! 

POWER — Only one, KOA-Radio, has 
the big. 50,000-watt "voice of the West" 
that Westerners have relied on for 
over 32 years! 

ACCEPTANCE — Only one, KOA- 
Radio, by "personalizing" its program- 
ming to suit Western tastes... along 
with a fine lineup of NBC programs, 
has established and maintained audi- 
ence leadership throughout the West. 

VALUE — Only one. KOA-Radio, is 
the buy that best delivers more for 
each advertising dollar spent, day and 
night, seven days a week. 

BONUS — Only one, KOA-Radio, 
reaches and delivers the huge summer 
audience of 12' ^ million tourists who 
vacation an average of 8.8 days in the 
Rocky Mountain Empire and spend 
more than 650 million dollars! Wher- 
ever tourists go in the West, they drive 
all day with KOA! 

PLUS — Only one, KOA-Radio, has the 
magnetism that results in measurable 
sales! Thousands of satisfied customers 
agree that if it's told on KOA. ..it's 
sold by KOA ! 

Call KOA Radio Sales or 
NBC SPOT SALES 




850 Kc 
50,000 watts 



5-S7 



DENVER /^OC6 



V0&? 



One of America's great radio stations 



82 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 




C. Wrede Petersmeyer has been elected 
||^*A president ol Corinthian Broadcasting Corp., 

newly formed arm of J. H. Whitney & Co. 
Corinthian will serve as the vehicle for 
coordinating the management policies of 
KOTV, Tulsa, KGUL-TV, Galveston, WISH 
& WISH-TV, Indianapolis and WANE & 
WANE-TV, Ft. Wayne. Petersmeyer. who 
will direct operations from New York, 
leaves Tulsa where he has been president of KOTV for the past three 
years and also up to last November, general manager. In his new 
position, Petersmeyer will continue to act as president of K( I I \ 
Inc. and the Indiana Broadcasting Corp. as well as chairman of the 
executive committee of Gulf Television Corp. Other directors and 
officers of Corinthian Broadcasting include: Walter N. Thayer, chair- 
man of the board, and Robert F. Bryan, secretary and treasurer. 

Thomas S. Carroll has been named mar- 
keting manager of the household products 
division at Colgate-Palmolive. The new 
division was created during the company's 
recent reorganization which divided domes- 
tic operations into two sections, household 
products and toilet articles. (See News 
and Idea Wrap-Up, 27 April.) The house- 
hold products division will be responsible 

for all the company's soap and detergent products. As marketing 
manager, Carroll will be in charge of advertising, sales promotion, 
packaging, media, and all facets of marketing necessary to move the 
divisions products to the consumer, with the exception of sales. 
He will report to William T. Miller who is the newly appointed vice 
president in charge of the household products division. Carroll 
formerly acted as brand advertising manager for Colgate-Palmolive. 

Neil Cline will join Henry I. Christal Co. 
as manager of the representatives firms 
Chicago office effective 6 May. For the past 
five years, Cline has been station manager 
of WHAS and WHAS-TV, Louisville, Ky. 
Cline started his broadcasting career in 
radio in 1938 as a member of the WHAS 
staff. He left WHAS in 1946 to become 
sales manager for KTBS. Shreveport, La. 
Then in V)V) he returned to WHAS as sales director of the radio 
station. He held this position for three years prior to taking charge 
of \\ HAS and \\ H AS- 1A >ales operations. Other new appointments 
at Christal include: Tom Klement, formerly of Shell Oil. now on 
the New York sales staff; Robert Hund. who is being added to the 
Detroit office: and Kirk Monroe, who will report to New l ork 
prior to the opening of Christal's new \tlanta branch this summer. 





SPONSOR 



4 may 1957 




PHONE HA 20277 



WHEN 



MEREDITH 

SYRACUSE 

RADIO CORP- 




LO EW BUILDING, SYRA 



CUSE 2, NEW YORK 






^PeVclY WHEN Radio sales 

«-* «ars &«« ~- sw ^ of 

„ the station or Central L*-**^.. 

f ° r a?i a on-S personalities «ho have P 
ability- 

M on. «xa.ple of that f lUg J*J.| 
^.secoga oo-|«lal for 

Sat'one apot, *ree be 

nd Kay on our sales 

■« that v.^ r ^^ynS , «?li« r S^ " 
staff h0 * *r uoitate Me« Vork. Call 
SS'-l" sL'Kn onager, for their 



Cordially* 



O^L 



Q^U^> 



Paul Adanti 
Vice President 



^^^T&WS^Stf^ 



GARDENS AND SUCCESS* 



Ul FARMING MAGAZINES 






- . ■ 



- ..»- 



*£&£$;* 



MEREDITH STATIONS 

KCMO and KCMO-TV,Kansas City • KPHO and KPHO-TV, Phoe nix 
WOW and WOW-TV,Omaha • WHEN and WH EN-TV, Syracu fe 



?ON:»OR 



4 may 1957 



83 



SPONSOR 






What spot radio needs now 

Spot radio today faces tougher competition from network 
radio than at any time in the post-tv era. The networks have 
made vast strides, following spot's own lead, and today it's 
apparent that some of the dollars going into net radio would 
have gone to spot in previous seasons. 

Now what's spot going to do about it? 

SPONSOR, which was confident that radio had a big future 
(and said so repeatedly) back in the days when many were 
content to accept its decline, is no less confident today 
about spot's continued growth. But what spot must do is 
redouble its efforts to achieve the full stature as an advertis- 
ing medium which it still lacks today. 

Network radio's progress can prove beneficial for spot 
radio if it serves to stimulate spot's salesmen. They have a 
tremendous story to tell. It's because of the success of ad- 
vertisers in spot radio, after all, that network radio has been 
able to reinterest national advertisers. But spot's sellers must 
continue to marshal the facts about their medium and dig 
still deeper for the kind of documentation the advertiser 
needs and expects. 

Naturally spot and network radio will continue to compete 
hard, fighting for the business of existing radio clients. What 
is more important for the growth of both is that radio at- 
tract new advertiser- as well. 

Fred Gamble, president of the 4 A's, said at the associa- 
tion's annual meeting last week that the $10 billion expended 
for advertising in 1956 was likely to increase 5 to 10% thi> 
year. Radio will not get its full share of this growth by en- 
gaging in an intra-mural tug of war for the same clients. 
Network and spot radio salesmen both must bring back more 
old radio clients and find completely new ones. 

This is the right time, too, for sellers to get on with 
the job of making spot radio (and tv as well) easier to buy. 
Streamlining of paperwork: figures on what each company 
spend- in the medium; fast coordination between station and 
rep — these are all more important today as network radio 
stc])> up the competitive pace. 



\ 







this WE FIGHT FOR: Net tv programing 
for fall shows no freshness, too much trend- 
riding. \dtnen today have more say in network 
programing and should fight for new ideas. 
They suffer fust when audiences lose interest. 



;;i 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

View: Tv Guide reports that the ex- 
ecutive windows in the new NBC build- 
ing in Burhank, Cal., look out on a 
hospital on one side and a cemetery on 
the other. So quiet you can almost 
hear a rating drop. 

Heading from Variety — 
ABC Won't Let a Horse Talk 
Us horses demand equal time! 

Premium: Two box tops from Kel- 
logg's Sugar Frosted Flakes and 50( 
will get sonny a submachine squirt gun 
that holds a half-pint of water and is 
accurate up to 20 feet. Parents, head 
for the hills! 

Crave matter: The Hollywood Casket 
Co. furnishes all tv and movie com- 
panies with caskets, gratis, where 
scripts call for funerals. Hope they 
have a good supply of plain pine boxes 
for the adult Western trend. 

Our British cousins: i 1 i \n English 
version of \BC TV's Tic Tac Dough 
will be called Naughts and Crosses. 
(2) In this land where toilets are 
called "conveniences."' a cop\ writing 
war was recently waged between two 
manufacturers of lavatory cisterns, 
Shires & Co. vs. Fordham Pressings 
Ltd. The former's slogan. "Made by 
Shires — for \our convenience. was 
promptly countered by "Flushed with 
success — by Fordham."' 

Buzz: In its drive for mosquito con- 
trol. WDGY. Minneapolis, has adopted 
a reverse twist by urging listeners to 
take part in building a monument to 
The Unknown Mosquito of Minnesota. 
That's putting the bite in public serv- 
ice programing. 

Switch: KOPO-TV, Tucson, is chang- 
ing its call letters to KOLD-TV on 1 
May. KOLD-TV will continue to be 
associated with its sister operation, in 
Phoenix, KOOL-TV. Brrrrrrrr. 

Lineup: Cleveland Police Chief Frank 
\\ . Storj reports that Stephen Thomas, 
an alleged bank robber, surrendered 
within 36 hours after learning in In- 
dianapolis that he had been seen on a 
Douglas Edwards CBS TV show hold- 
ing up a Cleveland bank. Crime pays 
even less since tv. 

Help wanted: From Veu' ) ork Times 

RFC I. IT S6C 

"PRETH BABY" 

is needed to greet tv celebrities on 

Madison Ave. . . . 

Tall: about "bait" advertising. 



SPONSOR 



4 MAY 1951 



WATCH WTCN-TV 

...where BIG things are happening! 




We've just enlarged our trophy room... 

Had to, to make room for the two newest awards won by \VT( N -TV and 
WTCN-TV personalities. This time, from the Twin Cities branch of AFTHA. to 
Frank Siefert, (left above), the award for the outstanding Master of Ceremonies on TV, 
and to Frank Buetel (right above \ the award for Best Sportscaster for TV. 
We mention these awards with due modesty. After all, haven't we been saying 
"Watch WTCN-TV, where BIG things are happening"? Gel the sales 
reward these awards can bring you. Contact 
your Katz representative today! 



WTCN-TV 

MINNEAPOLIS -ST. PAUL 
ABC Network - 316,000 watts 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency, Inc. Affiliated with WFDF, 
Flint; WOOD AM & TV, Grand Rapids, WFBM AM & TV, Indianapolis. 




We Tried 
But We Failed! 



The Senator's goal is 50% of the audience 
in the big four station Sacramento 
Television Market. 

The February ARB gives KCRA-TV 



49.1^ 



Sign-on 
to Sign-off 
Sunday to 
Saturday* 



This is more audience than the CBS 
and ABC stations combined. 

But the Senator's hard to please. 

To attract the most audience, the Senator 
controls more feature film than all other 
Sacramento Stations combined: all Columbia 
feature film packages: 80% of 20th 
Century-Fox and 75% of Warner Bros. 

On top of this, he has 1 2 out of the first 1 5 
syndicated shows and such choice properties 
as "Silent Service." "Sheriff of Cochise" 
and "Annie Oakley." 

Edward Petry's men can tell you 
how your clients will enjoy the ride 
to dominance with the Senator. 



^ Maybe next time. 




K Ask Retry About The Highest Rated NBC Station in the West! 



C L < 




6 



Serving 28 Northern California and Nevada Counties 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



30 n 

/ ' Y 






PO 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/ R 




ADVERTISERS USE 



"Understand there's 
never a dull moment 



for advertisers, 
either." 




tf of these 5 important markets . . . 

r time is a good time with the Storz Station. 



1IEAP0US-ST. PAUL . . . with WDCY. 
1957 Nielsen shows WDGY firsl NS1 

u.-ti p.m.. Mou. -Sat. i Latest Trendex 

M'DGY first all day. Latesl Hooper and 

t 'ulse have WDGY first every afternoon 

you're working with up-to-date data 

■ Twin Cities. See John Blair or WDGY 

S" 'vo Lahunski. 

MA . . . with KOWH. Now in its sixth 

■ first place dominance. First on latesl 

■ nil Trendex. First in 24ii of 264 Pulse 
quarter-hours. Contact Adam Young 

K< »\V1I Ceneral Manager Virgil Sharpe. 

kS CITY . . . with WHB. First per 
first per Area Nielsen, firsl per Pulse, 

Trendex. >7',' renewal rate among 




Kansas city's biggesl advertise!- .. dy- 

namic sales pow.r See John Blair or WHB 
i CM ( ieorge W Armsl rong. 

NEW ORLEANS . . . with WTIX. Month 

month WTIX maintains or wid - ts first 
place position in New Orleans listening, 
on Pulse 6 a.m.-ti p.m., Mou I '• \ 
per latesl Hoopi r m Young i 

WTIX c.M Fred B< thelson 

MIAMI . . with WQAM. \\ iiy out front. 

More thai I be audienci 

tion, per latesl Hooper. Now Pulse joins H 

and Trendex in agreement : All th 

WQAM firsl -all day: - !m Blair, or 

WQAM GM Jack Sandler. 



TODD STORZ. 

President 



HOW COMPTON 
LAUNCHED 
PRODUCT "X" 

W li.it i- tin- roll 
agei irketing 

parUnent? 'Iln- 
bistor) tbo 

m.irk<-l 

other ien i' ••- i on 

Page 29 



Evergreen's 
farm tv 
exclusive 

Page 3* 

Are funny radio 
commercials 
right for you? 

Page 37 




TV BASICS: 
costs, ratings 
programing 

Page 41 



FIRST NEW RADIO STATION 
IN NEW YORK IN 14 YEARS 




1330 KC-THE NEW SOUND FOR NEW YORK 

with a hard-hitting new concept in programming — planned to 
produce new sales for advertisers in the world's largest market 

H. SCOTT KILLGORE, President & General Manager 
A Tele-Broadcasters Station • 41 East 42nd St. • N. Y. 17, N. Y. • MUrray Hill 7-8436 

KALI Pasadena, L. A. • WPOP Hartford, Conn. • KUDL Kansas City, Mo. • WKXV Knoxville, Tenn. 



WE'RE THE 



HIGHEST 



COMMON DOMINATOR 



THAT 



THAT'S 



It's common for WBT to dominate, but thanks to Henxj 
Clay oi K.WKH, Shreveport, Louisiana, who had the con 
test, to the contestants who had the curiosity, and to Nielsen, 

who had the confirmation, now we know : 



WBT 



RADIO is one of the top three 



metropolitan stations in the nation in margins of weekl) 
audience superiority over its next home-count) competitor 
both locally and in total audience reached. 

These margins of superiority are leads oi 72.? f f in home- 
county audience and of X94.9% in stations total homes 
reached weekly. 

This type of dominance is a common occurrence in \\ B I 
history, ancient and modern. First licensed broadcasting 
station in the Southeast. 50. (MM) watt WBT today, in its 36th 
year, also has the largest share-of-audience I Pulse) in Char- 
lotte, morning, afternoon and evening, Mondaj through 
Friday, the biggest stable of talent, the brightest showcase 
of awards, including a 1957 Ohio State in short, the big- 
time radio operation in its rich area. It will be common tor 
you to dominate, too, if you're on W B I . 



WBT 



RADIO - Charlotte 



Colossus of the Carolinas 

Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 

Represented Nationally h\ CBS Radio Spot Sales 



I SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



11 May 1957 • Vol. II. Vo. 19 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

How Compton launched Product' X 

29 m'iinmmi traces development of marketing strategy and t\ campaign 
for new product to show how marketing relates to other agency services 

CE wows a community with music 

33 ^ frankly commercial p.r. '•hum. "Kentucky" draws response in letters, 
compliments and plenty of good will for new General Electric plant 

Evergreen's farm tv exclusive 

34 This feed company buys the entire farm activities of an Oklahoma sta- 
tion, builds shows, retail contacts and commercials on two farm experts 

Should you get on the comedy commercial bandwagon? 

37 Creativity of radio copy has undergone an upsurge of great vitality 
with humor emerging as the strongest element. Should you tie in? 

Tv basics 

4X This month's Comparagraph features programing costs, how competing 
clients compare, alphabetical program index and spot television basics 



FEATURES 



18 Agency Ad Libs 
62 Agency Profile 
24 49th and Madison 
61 New and Renew 
70 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

S Newsmaker of the Week 
88 Reps at Work 
58 Sponsor Asks 



84 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
92 Sponsor Speaks 
66 Spot Buys 
92 Ten Second Spots 
16 Timebuyers at Work 
90 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
81 Washington Week 
22 WOmen's Week 



In Next Week's Issue 

How to promote a contest with saturation radio 

Using 300 announcement^ in four weeks on one station, Englander, a 
mattress company, made this San Francisco contest-promotion pay off 

The timebuyer team 

A del ounl ol who does whal as a team at Cunningham & Walsh 

launches thl Texaco "tower of power" campaign 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP— Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 

Advertising Staff 

Jane E. Perry 
George Becker 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 

Administrative Staff 

Octavia Engros 

M. Therese McHugh 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 

Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madisen) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign $11. Sin- 
gle copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17. 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Get more than %! 

(of Iowa's Food Sales Potential) 




WHO gives you Iowa's 
Metropolitan Areas (V3 of Food Sales) 
. . . PLUS THE REMAINDER OF IOWA! 



Iowa's six Metropolitan Areas, all 

combined, do 37.5% of the State's 

Food Sales. The rest of Iowa accounts 

for a whopping 62.5%! 

You can buy a number of Iowa radio stations and 
get good coverage of individual Metropolitan Areas — 
but WHO gives you high coverage of ALL Metro- 
politan Areas, plus practically all the REMAINDER 
of Iowa, too! 

FREE MERCHANDISING! 

WHO Radio maintains one of the nations most com- 
prehensive and successful FREE merchandising services 
in 3^0 high-volume grocery stores for FOOD adver- 
tisers who buy S300 gross time per week; in 250 high- 
volume drug stores for DRUG advertisers who buj 
$250 per week. (A $200 Food plan is also available.) 
Ask us — or PGW — for all the facts! 

WHO Radio is pan of 

Central Broadcasting Company. 

which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



S.ou. C.iy - ■ 

P., Mom.. — II IV- 
Dubuqw. — 3 1". 

M-CMm — lot - . 
C.do> »op.d« — 3 ?•• 
W.I.-I.. — 



REMAINDER 
OF IOWA 

62.5%! 



IOWA FOOD SALES 

1956 Consumer Market Figures 

WHO 

for Iowa PLUS ! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. H. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
Robert H. Harter. Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin. Woodward, Inc., 
National Represt iitatit < i 



fe 



I'ONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



Already fW in Dallas- ft Worth. 




Here are the stations . . . check the score!! Area surveyed . . . Dallas-Fort Worth 43-county area 



MONDAY TO FRIDAY 



Stations 

KL'IF-KFJZ 

Network Station A (CBS) 

Network Station B (NBC) 

Network Station C (ABC) 

Network Station D (Mut ) 

Independent Station 'A' 

Independent Station B 

Independent Station C 

Independent Station D 

Independent Station 'E' 

Independent Station T 
Miscellaneous 
Total Percentage 
Homes Using Radio 



6 a.m. - 1 2 Noon - 6 p.m. • 
12 Noon 6 p.m. 12 Mid. 



30 
1 



100 
26.3 



100 
27 



100 
21.3 




No wonderKLIF-KFJZ in combination is the choice of national spot buyers . . .EVERYWHERE I 

Strengthen your position in the fast-growing key market of the 
Southwest. Call your nearest John Blair office for current data 
and availabilities on KLIF-KFJZ. 



A Pulse Area Report — 

Dallas-Fort Worth 

43-County Area, February. 1957 



JOHN BLAIR & CO* representative* 

KLI F/2104 JACKSON ST. • DALLAS 1, TEXAS KFJZ /4801 WEST FREEWAY • FORT WORTH, TEXAS 



SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



v \ • , J A 



the week 



The news: To mark the second annual Motional Radio II eek, 
.") through 1 1 \la\. R //>' i executive team has taken to the hustin 
proclaim the gospel. During tu<> weeks oj speechmaking president 
K- in Sweeney, vice-president-general manager John Hardest) ami 
vice-president-promotion director Sherril Taylor will aim theii \ln>t\ 
at the >!>', increase in business the) think radio ran get in I 



The newsmaker: Kevin Sweeney, I! \l>- -;il<- fireball and 
the radio industry'9 chief promoter to admen, look- ;ii National 
Radio Week with feelings ol satisfaction mixed with more than .1 
pinch ol dissatisfaction, ["he satisfaction derives from the wa) radio 
Btations have employed K \H material created for M!\\ . which is 
sponsored !>\ RAB, NARTB, Radio-Electronic-Television Manufac- 
turers \— n. and National Appliance and Radio-T^ Dealers Vssn. 
Unong the hundreds of stations who tie in with \l!\\. about 1 < m > 
wenl all out with saturation techniques in 1956. Sweene) expects 
the saturation boys to number 
double that figure this \ear. 

The dissatisfaction is with the 
promotional support N l\\\ doesn t 
gd from other segments of the 
industry, particular!) the radio set 
manufacturers. "Radio manufac- 
turers have done little to sell sets," 
Sweene) said. "If people l>u\ 14 
million sets a year without pro- 
motion, what would the) buy if 
the) were promoted?" 

To do their share of promoting, 
the team of Sweeney, Hardest) and 

ray lor will log more than 20,000 miles and -peak in II cities to 
audiences estimated at more than 1,000 (all admen 1. 

I! \l> spearheads the M!\\ observance at a peak in its promotional 
activities, with a sale- -tatT practically double that of last year and 
a budget approaching the annual rate of 1900,000. But, Sw« 
points out, H \H i- -till doing a missionar) job. I he a< • omplishments 
of which Sweene) i- the proudest these days are not the cases w : 
RAB has convinced radio advertisers to spend more in radio, but 
the cases where advertisers whose radio investment wa- nil and arc 
now spending three, eight or IV , in the medium. 

\-ide from the pleasure in winning over client- who didn't even 
know radio existed. Sweene) gets hi- kicks from the growing 
variety of advertisers and the freeing of radio from a small group 
of major advertisers who can call the tune on l>L ^ 




tin Stvi 




SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



mrwrnmum 



There n a GREATER SALT 
LAKE available only to 

KSL Radio clients It s 1 11 
counties m eight western 
states where KSL is the 

buy-word when it comes 
to believobility It s a n- 
oreo of 1617 200 people 
more than Pittsburgh or 
Clevelond It s a composite 
of booming metropolitan 
areas and bustling smoll 
towns where people ore Sold 
on KSL Radio 




(Tfu 



,..- 



L 



I A 






Effective June I. TOD W-HOME-TONIGHT's gill edged Dividend Participation 
Plan gives you new extra value at no additional <<>m Now you can earn dividend 
announcements by buying as few as 6 participations in summer, 12 in othei * 

For example, this summer (June 1 —September 6) an ordei l"i 20 1 II I participa- 
tions gives you 10 additional free. Here's the n>\t breakdown for :(<> announcements: 



bon 


CURREN1 COS! 
(NO DIVIDEND) 


NEW COS! 

(with dividi nd) 


PER 1' \K 1 It I1'\I Ion 


TODAY 


$174,690 


$116,460 


$3,882 


HOME 


$246,540 


$164,360 


S5.479 


TONIGHT 


$217,440 


$144,960 


$4,832 




Based an lull network basic lineups TOD M H 


n\u <- / tmem 



With the recent 20% time cosi reduction Foi lul>\Y participate 

Friday, 7-9 VM) and this new Dividend Participation Plan, III I 

of a blue-chip \>u) than ever Get the details from youi NB( x :i\c. 

TELEVISION NETWORK 




This one television station 

delivers four standard 

metropolitan area markets plus 



• 917,320 TV sets 

• 1,015,655 families 

• 3V2 million people 

• $3% billion retail sales 

• $6V£ billion annual income 

WGALTV 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 
NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION . Clair McCollough, Pres. 

Jtepresentofive: 

The MEEKER Company, Inc. 

New York Chicago 

Cos Angeles San Francisco 



CHANNEL 8 MULTI-CITY MARKET 




be"E»so 




Most liglliflcfUti tv urul railm 

ntWt "f llif ur,k uilli inlrrprrtatian 

in depth jar /<im readm 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



II MAY 

CavyrliM IM7 
•PONSOK PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Impact aote: Here's why ■ recording company i- leaning ma album <>i adver- 
tisers' jingles: 

roda) - kid- often become addicts <»f singing commercials befon the) learn nui 

rh\ mes. 



I lie feature film as an article of t\ commerce is headed for it- first big economii ! 
ache: How to keep from pricing the post-1948 product out of the market. 

\ simple dose of aspirin isn't going in work when you consider that: 

• The studios are committed to paj S\(, 3.V ; of tin- <;ross on .ill -alt-- <-f j 
I'M:: features. 

• 'I he pyramiding doesn't stop there, because tin- salesman collects hi- l<>', com- 
mission on the gross sale. Hence a film that theoretical!) would sell for |100 actually 
has to sell for si 18.50. 

• Feature ratings have been leveling off. Station- ahead) an- ha\in_' a ton 
justifying their late evening rates — especialK where two 01 three are bucking each other \% ith 
celluloid simultaneously. 

Some station men predict that on the basis of costs \-. potential ratings it *ill 1"' 
sounder in the long run to continue using pre- 1 '> 18 product* 



Meanwhile Kaiser Aluminum ami Exquisite Form Ilrassiere. Inc.. figured tin- 
week in negotiatitons for the sponsorship of post-1950 films. 

Both advertisers are after United Artists' product. 

EXQUISITE'S PLAN: The licensing of 26 l'\ films for two years at a flat $4 mil- 
lion, exclusive of print costs. The campaign would be handled bj the Grej agency for spot 
placement. 

KAISER'S PLAN: Scheduling a combination of UA and 20th Century-Fox feeturt 
ABC TV from 7:30 to 9:30 Sundaj nights. Masterminding the deal is Peter Levathes, v.p. 
in charge of media at Y&R. Estimated cost of the campaign for features and time: - 
million. 



It may sound like heresy to Hollywood, but the question being raised more and 
more on Madison Avenue is: What's the good of pilots? Here's why: 

• Over 65% of the sponsored failures this Beason were bought from pilots. 

• As a cushion against a had guess, the pilot allegedly offers no advantage <>\rr the so- 
phisticated agencyman's appraisal of a shoe's prospects on paper. 

• Anyway, it takes 13 weeks for a show to shake down, and within that 
you should be able to prove it- possibilities, regardless of a pilot. 



Nevertheless Hollywood's tv film mills are grinding out pilots like MUSI 
Leo Burnett's L.A. office says it has counted 1 7« new pilots either completed or in 
duction. They include: 

Anthologies, specialties, documentaries. 7th westerns, 10; situation comedies Ken- 

ture shows. 20: musical. 15: and juvenile appeal. 8. 

Estimated cost for turning out the-e 178 jobs: Over |5 million. 



SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



II you plan to sponsor a dramatic series on Iv lliis fall, you ought to know about 
the advantages and disadvantages you'll run into from the publicity point of view. 

Uter talking to some agencies on that subject this week. SPONSOR-SCOPE got these 
li|>~. hints, and opinions: 

1) A filmed show usualh i- reviewed hut once or twice a season, while live drama 
ma) get as man) as 40 newspaper reviews throughout the country. 

2 1 The average live dramatic show can figure on 25 reviews per broadcast. 

.'! i Critics' reactions, broadly speaking, run 50% favorable and 50% otherwise. 

I) The major headache emerging from this welter of attention often is a ery of an- 
guish from some smaller distributor, citing a bad local review and asking how he can 
be expected to sell the product after this sort of panning. 

V woman statistician in Texas has come up with her own version of how to 
count tv homes in the Lone Star state. 

Her plan is to get from the State Bureau of Taxation the names of those who have 
paid an excise tax on tv sets, compute ownership from this b) count) and sell the data 
to Texas tv stations. 

The stations, in turn, could apply the figures to their own coverage areas. 

The statistician — LaNell Smallwood — calls her service Texas Television Report. She 
operates out of Austin. 

Radio and tv accounted for 27% of the $4-78 million spent in 1956 by Ameri- 
can firms for media outside the U.S. 

A survey by the International Advertising Association shows that radio got 22^ : tv. 
.">' < : newspapers. 11 '< : and foreign magazines and trade journals. 24%. 

The average boost in daytime spot radio rates in markets of over 100.000 
population was around 10% during the past year. 

This information is included in a survey of station rates that the SRA has just completed 
for the Kudner agency. 

A comparison of the one-time highest one-minute rate from April 195G to April 
1957 in the survey's top three population groups shows: 

NO.MARKETS POPULATION vm 

41 500,000 and over % 1.771 

47 250,000 to 499,999 780 

92 100,000 to 249,999 1,048 

Best Foods is switching its marketing and advertising plans for Nucoa. 

As a first step in experimenting with a new marketing formula, the margarine packer 
has canceled the Galen Drake Show on ABC TV (the remainder of the contract was set- 
tled with a cash pa) ment I . 

The next step will be to test three or four basic sales approaches this summer in 
widelv divergent areas via the Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli agency. 

The Housewives' Protective League — a CBS service subsidiary — this week in- 
dicated that grocery chains and department stores are taboo as clients. 

This policy takes into account that: 

1) National brands are HPL's best customers, chains too often have divided loy- 
alties because of their own private brands. 

2) An HPL personality can move freely in bis personal appearances only so long as 
he has no obligations to any particidar point-of-sale sites. 

10 SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



1957 


INCREASE 


81.922 


8.5', 


877 


12.59! 


1.053 


0.-1 ', 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Two weeks ago, SPONSOR-SCOP] reported (27 IprilJ that thi complexitim ol spot 
were causing some resentment in agenc] circles, thai the -|">t fraternit) was pre] 
cope with this fire, and thai "SPONSOR will keep you informed. , I In- week then 
was the following to report i 

Two agencies thai have found ways of making -pot paperwork faster and sim- 
pler are Morey, Hnmm A Warwick, Inc. and < unningham A Walsh, rheii im 

lion-: 

MJFI&Ws PAYMENT SYSTEMt Instead of mailing a lull .,i the end -.f the month, 
a Btation ill inserts it- invoice in an envelope bank draft on the agency, and 

i.'}| completes the face of the draft l>\ writing the name of tin- station ami the smounl of the 
invoice. The draft i- handled through regular banking channels i- i caafa item, 

(XFS CONTRACT-CONFIRMATIOIN PROCEDURE] \- 

firms a schedule, he sends tin- agency three copies of tin- confirmation. 
signatured cop) is mailed right back to him. making tin- confirmation a contract, 
added advantage: The chances of schedule revisions are eliminated. 

i For more on C&Ws updated spol methods see "The timebuying team," I •"■ Maj spo; 
al-o see "'Let's cut -pot's paper maze," 2 March sponsor.) 



Latot episode in the growing controversy ovei trading time foi t: idam Young, 
Inc., is refusing to accept commissions from barter time sold In NTA in connection 
with its feature film network. 

Young explains his action this waj : 

"Regardless of how other reps ma\ fed about taking \l \- money, I think I would 
put myself in a bad light by accepting commissions from a competitor. 

"These harter deals are snowballing, and I think that, among others, the fvB 
to itself to take a strong stand on the i^Mie." 



CBS Radio ibis Meek wrapped up its spectacular S5.5-millinu (gross) dial 
with Ford to the accompaniment of much headline fanfare 

With discounts, tbe net income from the 52-week a g reeme n t - five houi 

programing per day, se\en days a week I will come to £1.2 million. 

(For more detail-, see 27 \pril and 1 \l;n SPONSOR-S( 0P1 



NBC Radio quietly, but steadily, is moving onward ami upward. 
It hasn't had a sensational haul, such as CBS gol in Ford, but it to sign 

hast SoOO.OOO worth of business each week. 

The latest hatch of new NBC Radio contracts includes: 

• California Packing: 2(> weeks of a quarter -hare of News < >„ the Houi I 

• Plough Chemical: 20 participations a week on Monitor ($110,00 

• General Foods (Jell-O) : oil six-second participations in Bandstand and Truth I 
sequences iS130.0001. 

• 20th Centurv-Fo\: S40.000 worth of participations in Monh* 
period for the exploitation of Rernardine. 



Tbe light-touch radio commercial a real favorite latel) has an enticing 

rj? 

nomic advantage as well as a catch] change ol \ia<<-: 

With humorous chatter replacing mu^i<\ the advertiser can save from 1500 np in 
talent and production costs per spot. 

i See "Should you eel on radio*- comedy commercial bandwaj 



United Artists expects t<> gross at least $12 million from tin- -ah- ot it- fea- 
tures to tv in 1957. 

In 1956, l"\ got $2.5 million from the medium. 



SPONSOR • L MAY 1957 



11 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Like the Kentucky Derby, the $6-milIion Pabst account went to something of 
a darkhorse in the meet — Norman, Craig & Kummel. 

Curiously, another New York agency previously had just passed up an opportunity to 
bid for the business because it felt it wasn't quite ready to handle it. 



Look for a record concentration of money in the air media by advertisers with 
Christmas gift products. 

Indications are that they will do their shopping earlier than ever. 
Some already have inquired from year-around tv network customers about the possi- 
bility of buying into their programs during the pre-holiday weeks. 



Ronson Shaver is spending $1.5 million on NBC TV news as part of its air 
campaign for the Christmas buyer. 

The package consists of 37 programs, spread from September through mid-Decem- 
ber. 

There will be two feeds: The first at 6:45 p.m. and the other (at 7:15 I for Midwest and 
tardy Eastern outlets. 

A fair number of network tv prospects will hold off their fall program de- 
cisions until June or July. 

Causes for the delay: 

• They aren't impressed with the shows on the market thus far. 

• The networks, especially CBS TV, likewise have been rejecting properties on the ground 
they're shopworn. 

• Hollywood is unwrapping a batch of new pilots that advertisers are anxious to see be- 
fore buying. 

(See News Wrap-up under Networks for a list of programs set by advertisers during the 
past week.) 

American Tobacco's heavy barrage in behalf of its Hit Parade filter brand 
hasn't yet begun to soften up the customers enough. 

Both sales and earnings for the first quarter were below the year before: 

Sales dropped from $251 million to $245 million and earnings from $11.3 million to 

$10.1 million. 

Competitors estimate that the initial ad investment in Hit Parade already has 

passed the $15-million mark. 



General David Sarnoff, in commenting on RCA's earnings for the initial quar- 
ter, reasserted his abiding faith in color tv this week. 

Said he: Profit margins on sales of black-and-white sets now are low or even non- 
existent. But there's nothing wrong with the tv industry that can't be cured by color. Ob- 
stacles to color are being "overcome one by one and day by day." 

Record-breaking sales gave RCA $295,773,000 for the quarter, 8% over the first three 
months of 1956. Net profits after taxes were S12.8 million — up $83,000. 



Westinghouse Broadcasting completed its allowable quota of tv stations with 
the purchase of WAAM-TV, Baltimore, this week. 

The deal involves an exchange of stock amounting to about $4.4 million. 



For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 61; Spot Buys, page 66; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 70; Washington 
Week, page 81; sponsor Hears, page 84; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 90. 



12 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



Thi% time we got help. Our 1,450' above- average- terrain tower is on the 




We've always cherished the idea that you don't have to rattle your tonsils 
to prove your worth. Take a look at the Sphinx. She's been sitting pretty for hundred 
years, without ever opening her mouth. And why do you think Mona Lisa made out bo good? 

When we placed our hot new submarine-adventure series, "The Silent 
Service," into TV syndication, we said to ourselves: "Okay. We want to spread the word to the 
far corners of the land. But do we have to scream our heads off? Do we have to announce a 
new series with the usual 4-color foldouts, pushups, pullouts. Maybe even hydrogen fallouts?" 

"Up your periscopes, fellows! Take another look around," we told ourseh 
"Maybe it isn't always possible in every line of business, but wouldn't it be ni 
build sales volume without noise volume?" We gave ourselves a fast and resoundii 

So we launched our seagoing series without a big splash. We didn't break 
a bottle of champagne over its prow in the trade press. We drank the champagi I we let 

CNP's prime product, created exclusively for local, regional and spot advert!- r it- 

self. We discovered that if you really have something to say. they'll listen to you. Even if 

Whisper it. Like this: In less than one short month. "The • rvice" has been sold in more than 75 markets, including 

17 of the 25 largest population centers in the United Statos. NBC TELEVISION FILMS 

h division of CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCT!' 



CASE HISTORY— SUPERMARKETS 




It- no secrel that fresh produce sales have 
hen weakening as fasi a- frozen and canned 

I I- have been strengthening. Except, that 

i-. in the 26 Los Angeles supermarkets of 
Von's (Grocery Company, where the down- 
grade slowed in 1955, reversed itself with a 
slight uptrend in 1956, and is continuing 
firm in 1957. 

Substantially responsible for the counter- 
trend are the trio pictured above, creators 
of \ on's produce department'- 5-vear-old 
daily radio program HOMEMAKERS 
NEWS: Margee Phillips, KBIG write,: \. 
If. Bolstad, Von's produce supervisor; and 
Alan Lisser, KBIG program director, who 
narrates the five-minute feature of fruit and 
vegetable information and practical food 
helps. 

"Fresh produce is one area where a store 
can create a personality for itself . . . some- 
thing impossible in standardized brand 
label departments" says "Buzz"' Bolstad. 
"Our company has gone to great length- to 
build that personality in each Von"s market, 
and our KBlG show enables us to translate 
it as an image in thousands of consumer 
minds. 

"Tests of HOMEMAKERS NEWS have in- 
cluded offers of cooking booklets, in which 
demand invariably exceeds supply; sales 
check-, in which promoted items have risen 
from 20% to 32 f 7 : and a giftbag offer in 
which a supply of 25,000 was quickly ex- 
hausted.'' 

Your Weed man is a prime source of other 
case histories to help your evaluation of 

Southern California radio. 




KBIG 



The Calalina Station 
10.000 Walts 



JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 6unset Blvd.. Los Angeles 28. California 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-320S 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



In 




Timebuyers 
at work 




Bill Abrams, SSCB, New York, timebuyer for Rise and Blue Coal, 
comments tliat buyers must careful!) appraise special purchases such 
as pre- and post-game sports shows in which a sports celebrih is 
interviewed. For the best buy, these factors must he considered: 
I I i Ratings. "We try to secure more than one day's or one week's 
rating. In reviewing many pre- 
and post-game availabilities, we 
found that rating histories are 
often spottv and limited to only a 
few events for the season. These 
figures are not necessarily repre- 
sentative, of course, and often give 
the buyer an inaccurate picture of 
the show r 's real value. I 2 I Com- 
petitive programing. "A man can 
select his own baseball game to go 
to, but he can't alwavs select the 
television show he'd like to watch 
if a competing show appeals to his wife and family. l3i The local 
personality. '"Be sure he knows how to handle sports celebrities and 
talks the language of sports. Some local announcers are neither 
equipped bv personalitv and/or background to competently conduct 
such a show. I 4 I Attendance records and team standing. "These are 
an excellent measure of interest and lo\altv to the home team.' 



George Huelser, Maxon Inc., New York, timebuyer for G.E.s 
electronic equipment, comments: "All advertisers seek large audi- 
ences and low-cost-per-l.OOO's. But these C/P/M s must be converted 
into the advertisers target, whether it be men. women, teen-agers, 
children, etc. The next major consideration is the turn-over factor. 

You must know how many of the 
gross impressions on vour market 
are unduplicated and what propor- 
tion makes up frequency of im- 
pression. Also, an advertiser's 
( P M on a i umulative basis ma\ 
be prohibitive and on a gross basis 




may appear exciting. Non-dupli- 
cation, of course, is of varying im- 
portance depending upon the prod- 
uct. Generally, the low cost, long 
life product — provided onlv one 
can be used at a time — must have 
a large cumulative base even at sacrifice of frequencv. The cigar- 
ette advertiser could live with small net audiences and great fre- 
quency, whereas anything hut a large net audience would he deadly 
to a three-month sha\e halm advertiser. By the same token, the 
cigarette's targeted C/P/M must always he on a gross basis, whereas 
the shave balm - must he good on both a net and a gross basis." 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



A & P Tea Co. 


Ford Deal' 




Adam, Melrum & Anderson 






Aladdin Car, 


Glcimur Produ 




Margarine 


ton 




Amoco 


Greyhound Co 




Anacin 


Half & Half Tobacco 




«■! 


^ 




^P^ 


■ Hometown Br- 




W^ 


« Honig Jew. 




^«^ 


4Li 




3ay 


Household Fine 




E. Clark Bennett 


Milton H. Hub 




n-Graham 


Ice Capci' 




vay Stc 


"1 _L 




Products 




■JLv 


^>» ■■ I^"%> ■» ■■ 4> 


^#u*t 


Brown Motor So 


r ril n 


C^ 


Buff. 


'•o| III 1 


r— ? 


Lb 


JL Xiv^y W4. -L 


V^ 


Buffalo Industrial Bank 


national Harvi 




Buffalo Raceway 


Jello Pudding 




Buick D 


Kaufmann Bakery 




J. Burnham 


Keebler Biscuit 




lac 1 


Kleinhans 




■L« 


^■fcpb ackers 




1 Cigarettes 


^^V>atts 




Capital Airlines 


■ m > Shampoo 




1^, 


^^_— ^F 


H ! 


Cigare! 


Lafayette Theatre 


Up 


tre 


Lewin Bros. 




eld Cigarettes 


Libby McNeill & Libby 




olet 


erty ' ■■ 


w 




■ 




^—M 


i «■»*. ^*J -■ ^-^ 


L. E 


|r 


j ri 1 r\ 


Jos 


Coca Cola 


n i i j 


Socony Mo: 


JL 


LlvAlv./ 


Sq 


Cold 


Magla Products 




Colgate 


Manufacturers & Traders 




Contadina Tomato Paste 


Trust Co. 


Ta 


Continental Baking 


Marine Trust Co. 


co. Gas 


tal Beach Transit 


Miles LaboratC' 


Tilo Roc 


^^ 


— Ik fnr kL^lth _ — 


^^ ^ — 


^^ 


■Y^a^NT^ O 


a^^T^O 


^^•j 


i It 1 ^ 


it If ^ 


1^^ 


f Mv/lliJ 


vy J_ kD 


Doans Pills ^^ 


Nescafe 




Dodge Dealers 


***" w York 


Web-Cor 


Don Allen Chevrolet 


Niagara Front th 


W 


Dow Anti Freeze 


Foundation 




Dromedary 


No-Cal Beverages 






Northern Paper Mills 


Wh 


ady Batteries 


Norwich Pharmacol 




in Distributors 


NuWay Stores 




Fletcher Castoria 


Ontario Government 


j g A ^^ y 



*MO KNEW a year ago that you could get "Eight big tomatoes in an ltty bitty can" 
Dnly the sponsor knew then now, 160 million people know — thanks to R.idto. 

** E SAME 160 million people that "Wonder where the yellow went", that "Get more 
bounce to the ounce", that know where to get a good deal on a new or used c 

J And the reason they know is Radio. 
DIO — that in one year brought fame and fortune to the Elvis Presl. 

Pat Boones and Harry Belafontes simultaneously brought highly successful 

;ales results to automobile manufacturers, food dealers and the store around the 

corner. Yes. Radio today sells everything from baby foods to baby grands 
- from pills to pillow cases. 

i honor of National Radio Week, we salute those sponsors who have the foresight 
and judgement to choose Radio .. .one of the most powerful advertising 
mediums in the world. 



m 

RADIO 

e Voice of Buffalo" 



TELEPULSE 



shows continued 
loaclcrsliip by 



WRBL-TV 




:OLUMBUS, GEORGIA 



CALL HOLLINGBERY CO. 



FIRST IN 

310 

OUT OF 

409 

QUARTER HOURS 

• In prime AA time wth 66.1 Homes 
using Television WRBL-TV scored first 
in 46 out of 50 Quarter Hrs. 

• In class A time with 50.2 Homes using 
Television WRBL-TV scored first in 49 
out of 56 Quarter Hrs. 



WRBL RADIO 

Leads in homes delivered 

55% MORE THAN STATION B 
Day or Night Monthly — N.C.S. No. 2 




WRBL 

AM - FM - TV 

COLUMBUS GEORGIA 



CALL HOLLINGBERY CO. 




by Bob Foreman 



Agency ad libs 




Brutus Bass and the no-account exec 

If \ou happen to see a chap walking down 
Madison Avenue sporting an extra arm and leg, 
it will he Brutus Bass or "Big Mouth" as he is 
affectionately known in the ad-husiness. "Big 
Mouth" Bass, account executive at the storied 
agency of Snook, Crappie and Bream. Inc., makes 
a great many talks to a great many groups dur- 
ing any given year. The extra limbs he bears 
are mine and are what I had to give to get permission to excerpt his 
recent talk to the Ronkonkoma, L. I. Ad Club on "What Makes 
An Account Man Great — or Grating."' I will reproduce, for obvious 
reasons, only those portions of this phillipic which apply to broad- 
cast media. 

"Perhaps," declared 'Big Mouth,' "it would be simpler to describe 
the top-notch account executive's grasp of broadcast media bv de- 
scribing what he doesn't do. In this manner I will be painting a 
picture, gentlemen, of a commonplace in our business — the a/e with 
two decades experience, most of it in print, who throws up his hands 
when mention of tv is made and says — T leave that to the tv bovs.' 
Or, what is even worse, he admits, solely to himself of course, that 
he has no knowledge of or sympathv with television. Hence he 
finds every possible reason to avoid use of the medium, expending 
what creative ability he possesses to keep his client out of tv. 

He avoided responsibility during tv's youth 

"Which is worse, I don't know," said 'Big Mouth.' "But regard- 
less, the account man who cannot or will not contend with television 
today and today's radio is in effect a no-account man. Bv what stretch 
of the imagination can he call himself a representative of any adver- 
tising expenditure and still ignore the newest and most provocative 
of media? 

"I recall one of this breed of agency denizens who used the ap- 
proach — T don't know anything about tv!' — to subtle advantage for 
several years until more alert agency management got wise and 
sent the man off to the showers. This chap used to say — 'whatever 
is tv is in the hands of the tv department and out of mine.' As a 
result he personally was able to avoid some of the early-day trials of 
the medium despite the fact that his client was heavily involved. 

"What a different with the good representative, one worthy of the 
name! He has for at least five years now taken a positive stand on 
television. He has mastered the technique of reading the Nielsen and 
Trendex pocketpieres. He has good judgment of programing — yet 
he still relies on the department for decisions of which show, what 
time slot, and how to interpret the ratings. I sa\ 'rely' and by this 
I mean that he is full\ and intelligently aware of every step so that 
his reliance on the tv specialists is one of understanding and agree- 
ment rather than blind faith or a desire to escape. 

"His knowledge of the medium comes from use and studv. When 



18 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



4 











Why Fels & Company prefers 

Crosley WLW Stations 

for Instant Fels Naptha 



Golden Soap Granulets 



LW Stations off* 
important extra of mighty grocery 
merchandising tied U] *.op 

Station Talent. Yes. lea 
TV-Radio personalities star 
product merchandising-promo 
as the Crosley Stations' experts 
cover the store fronts by top- 
level trade contacts, perse 
calls and point-of-sale push. So 
the Talent-tuned, power-packed 
merchandising-promotion of 
Crosley Stations really me 
business for advertiser 




Max Brown, Director of Sales 
Fels & Comp 



% 



Like Fels & Company, you'll get mighty merchandising-proir. 
products too with the WLW Stations. So before you buy. alv. 
with your WLW Stations' Representative. You'll be glad you c. 



WLW 

Radio 



WLW-T 

Cincinnati 



WLW-C 



WLW 



WLW-A 



Network Affiliations: NBC; ABC MBS Sales Offices: Ne.% York. Cincinnati. Chicago 

Sales Representatives: NBC Spot Sales: Detro t. Los Angeles. San Francisco 

Bomar Lowrance & Associates. Inc.. Charlotte. Atlanta. Dallas Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, a drvision 



- m° 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



19 



Agency ad libs continued 



THIS YEAR 



WBOF 



winner o 




ASSOCIATED 

PRESS 

AWARDS 

AMONG COMPARABLE 
STATIONS IN VIRGINIA 

3 - 1st Places 

• LOCAL & STATE NEWS 

• SPORTS 

• COMPREHENSIVE 

REPORTING 

1 - 2nd Place 

• FARM NEWS 

1 - 3rd Place 

• SPECIAL EVENTS 

This makes 8 A-P awards 
for WBOF since its start just 
28 Months ago . . . proven 
time and again a potent sell- 
ing force for a major seg- 
ment of America's 25th 
Market. Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Virginia Beach Area . . . 




VIRGINIA BEACH - NORFOLK 
AND PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA 

HIL F. BEST CO. 
National Representative 



20 



t\ loomed on the horizon, instead of taking another martini and 
uttering a prayer thai it would go away, he went into every aspect — 
production, copy, research techniques. He even went so far as to 
buy a set! Then when his kids started to insist on seeing this show 
and that show, in contrast to what he wanted to view for business 
reasons, he went out and bought a second set i after noting carefully 
what tremendous tujis which shows in which slots had over his kids 
and what they recalled of the sponsors' messages). 

"And when the first color sets appeared on the market, he didn't 
sa) Til wait till it's really arrived and they get the bugs out.' 
He went and had one installed. 

The good a/e gives the client confidence 

"Then when it seemed wise to get his own client into television — 
and to supplement this medium with the new type of radio coverage 
available, our good a/e didn't wait: he faced his client with all the 
facts and a firm recommendation! He explained what research tech- 
niques he would apply so that benchmarks could be established. He 
stood right up in front when the storyboards for the commercials 
were being shown — and he chimed in to make a point here and there 
— demonstrating he knew the tv term, the techniques, and the prob- 
lems, thereby making the Ad-Manager feel a lot more secure about 
the whole thing. 

"But most importantly," concluded 'Big Mouth' in a frenzy of 
rhetoric, "this man brings confidence with him to client meetings — 
confidence plus an enthusiasm for the new avenues to people's minds 
that science has given us. 

"Here is a man!" said "Big Mouth" Bass with a flourish and sat 
down to thunderous applause. ^ 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 

"An adman ad-libs on tv" 

A 192 page book of selected Foreman columns from 

sponsor, released by Hastings House. Publishers. Inc.. is 

now in your bookstore. Bob's pungent commentaries on the 

broadcast industry and his keen analysis of its problems 

| are illustrated by Al Normandia. 

The book, excerpted from columns which appeared in 
sponsor over the last five years, offers an 8-fold approach 
I to the air media: 

i 1 i The agencj and its denizens 

Tfc# t - r JH •' W ill 

(2) Nuts, bolts, commercials 

I A i The audience, confound em 

(4) Sponsors, the care and feeding of 

i 5 i The fine art of video. 

i () l Research — if you can call it that 

(7) The one without pictures — radio 

(8) Color or hue. whew! 

It adds up to an encyclopedia of entertainment and in- 
formation. 192 pages, illustrated, retails for $4.50. 

-.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii'i illllllllllllllllllilllllliili milillimtllllllli iimiiiinmi mm i minium iiiiini.iu mi mi ininiimii iillillllllinfl 




SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



T. V. spot editor 

A column $pontored by one of the leading film producers in teh n ision 

S A It It \ 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 







I his series oi I.D.'s i"i King's Men I >>il< im s provi > you don'i hav< 

to get attention even wht n you have '>nl\ 10 seconds < an ful 

the "common touch" make these spots friendly and effectivi Man-in-tl 

types give believability to su< h statements as: I don'i want to tx »n, I 

just u.i ii i to feel liki one." I In si ries ties in with the sponsor's inaga/im 

vertising and is produced by SARRA foi III I I \l CI RTIS INDUSTRIES 

INC. through EDWARD H. WEISS VND COMPANY 

SARRA, I n ( 

New ^ <n k: 200 I an 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



f£i 


4xfjto r _ 


m 


i — \ / C^i 

r "»\ > 



Iii lull animation advertising characters show the futility "I labored i 
mercials, when a simple slogan, "Reach foi O'Keefe < >lil \ i< nna 1 
will do. Fine selling commercials foi O'Keefe's and .i lesson to .ill ol us in 
TV advertising, these 60-second and 20-second spots leaturt O'Ko 
prize-winning label. Produced by SARRA foi O'KEEFE'S BREWING 
COMPANY LIMITED through COMSTOCK fc COMPAN\ 

SARRA, INC 

New \ <>i k: 200 l .im 56th Stro I 
Chicago: Hi Ban Ontario Street 



YOHKERS 
RACEWAY 




This spol explodes the theory thai fine animation is l\ foi lo 

V series ol l n and 20-second spots foi Yonkers Raceway proves thai fint 
ination (.in be limited and sti.ll be persuasive. In [act, thi 
ing in theii very simplicity . . . with .i light, modern touch that | fun 

at the track. Produced by SARRA foi YONKERS RAI 1 \\ VY, INt thi 
LESTERH VRRISON, 1N< 

SARS v im 

New York: 200 East 56th Stn - 1 

( Im ago: l<> Easi Ontai io Street 




\ seemingly endl< ss spr< ad ol coffei i ups 

'Drink coffee t lu rest ol your life without any calorii this 

shot in a one-minute Sucaryl commercial, animation-over-lii 
the product in us< without live talent. Appetizing photi vie- 

tion to the [actual portions of the spot. One ol a 
second commercials produced by SARRA fo VBBOT1 I VBORATORIES 



through I \ I II \M I MRU. IM 



s\RR V. IM 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

( liiiasjn: Hi t.i-t Ontario Sncct 



SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



21 




Ever 
hear 
of 
MIAMI 



TEXAS? 



\\ hen the folks in Miami 
(Texas. I mean) go shop- 
ping, they travel 40 miles 
to Amarillo. And they have 
money to spend! Matter of 
fact, the per family retail 
sales in the Amarillo area is 
nearly $6,000 annually. And 
that ain't hay, Mister! 

THe KGNC-TV-S-V 

"& s? Ptt KCNC-TV 
* a " *° r and you a'J 

bound to d nse d. 

W d ° u we bave been 
to Amarittos|nceJ9» 



Albuquerque 




KGNC-TV 

Channel 4 100,000 watts 

AMARILLO, TEXAS 

NBC-T\ Xlliliate 

Affiliated with KCNC-Radio and the 

Amarillo Globe News 

THE KATZ AGENCY 






News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



W omen broadcasters keep abreast of men: Anyone who thinks 
women are at a disadvantage in competing with men in the broad- 
casting business might take a look at these sponsor statistics: 

A spot check taken during the American Women in Radio & Tele- 
vision convention in St. Louis last week would tend to indicate just 
the opposite. 

The questions put to the girls and the answers in percentages were: 

1. How many of you have got a raise during the past year? 
Answer: 89%. 

2. How many of you have been given increased responsibilities? 
Answer: 85%. 

3. How many of you have gotten a promotion during the past 
year? Answer: 54%. 

How do you find a Betty Furness? Don't judge a gal announcer 
on looks only, savs Schwerin Research Corp. In fact, excessive 
glamor can be a handicap to the gal who wants to sell via the 
airways. If she's dealing with a kitchen product, for instance, she'd 
better look as if she were used to handling it, rather than like a 
Harper's Bazaar model. 

Schwerin cites a test in which three women tried the same food 
commercial before comparable tv audiences. The reaction to the 
looks of the three was pretty even. 

"But," says Schwerin, "when it came to whether they looked 
as though they knew their way around a kitchen Ian impression 
that the selectee was going to have to convey in commercials for 
this brand i. housewives rated one of the girls far above the others." 

Women as network salesmen? On the network level of radio 
and tv selling, it's pretty tough for women to get a chance to prove 
themselves. In fact, right now there's onlv one lady account execu- 
tive in network sales, and that "s Helen Guy at ABC TV. Helen, 
who's been selling ABC TV time and programing for two years, 
sees no reason why there couldn't be more women in the field in 
theory, "but in practice it's a lot harder.'" 

The hurdles women would have to clear are the following, ac- 
cording to Helen : 

1. Network selling requires maturity and well-rounded advertis- 
ing and broadcasting experience. (In other words, you don't work 
your way into it via the secretary and assistant a/e route. I 

2. Some businessmen still prefer dealing with men when it comes 
to sales, therefore a woman must prove to them that she can do as 
effective and matter-of-fact job as any man. 

3. The feeling (an illusion according to Helen) still lingers on 
that network selling or other big-money selling requires a great deal 
of nighttime entertaining. 

4. Biggest stumbling block of all is the availability of network 
sales jobs. Each network has a dozen or fewer salesmen on staff, 
and since these are desirable and well-paying jobs, the competition 
for them is stiff. 



22 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




how p| RST* CAN you get? 




NOVEMBER 1956 

PULSE 

Said it . . . 




MARCH 1957 

ARB 

Says it ACAIN! 



IN KNOXV1LLE 

WATE-TV HAS 
MORE VIEWERS 

Than All Other Stations Combined* 



'PULSE . 19 County Telepulse Report 
conducted Nov. 25 thru Dec. !. 1956. 

• MONDAY TO FRIDAY • 

7 AM. l2Nn. 6 PM. 

12 Nn. 6 PM. 12 Mid. 



T 



ARB . City of Knoxville Report con- 
ducted March 8 thru 14. 1957. 



• MONDAY TO 
FRIDAY • 



WATE-TV 

Share of 60 62 

Audience 

• SATURDAY • 

9A.M. 12 Nn. 6P.M. 
12Nn 6PM. 12Mid. 



WATE-TV 

Station share 
of Sets-in-Use 



S'gn-on-to 
1 2 Noon 



Noon to 
6.00 PM 



SUNDAY thru 
SATURDAY • 

6 00 PM to 
Midnight 



67.1 



69.1 



52.9 



WATE-TV 

Share of 
Audience 



71 



63 



• SUNDAY • 

9 A.M. 12 Nn 
12Nn. 6 PM. 



WATE-TV 

Share of 
Audience 



53 



6 P.M. 
12 Mid. 



WATE-TV 

Station share 
of Sets-in-Use 



• SATURDAY • 

Sign-on-to 6.00 PM. to 

6 00 PM Midnight 



64.3 



58.0 



56 



50 



54 



PLUS. . ' 4 out °* fne fop '-* once a 

week shows. 
PLUS ... 10 out of the top 10 multi- 
weekly shows. 



WATE-TV 

Station share 
of Sets-in-Use 

PLl S . 
I'll S . 



• SUNDAY • 

Signon-to 6 00 PM to 

6:00 PM M.dmght 



57.3 



62.4 



9 out of the top 10 once-a- 
week shows. 

5 out of the top 6 local day- 
time shows based on cumula- 
tive ratings. 



* * 



215,352 TV HOMES IN WATE-TV COVERAGE AREA 

"(TELEVISION MA&AZINE. APRIL. I«7— Apply;*" tiri -'■ I »d on -,.H r .»i»-;« ? Uctat] 

WATE-TV 



POWER MARKET OF THE SOUTH 



Knoxvil le t Ten nessee 




Affiliated with WATE Radio 5000 Watt!. 620 Kc. • Represented Nationally by AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



SPONSOR 



11 ma* 1957 






AN feMitftt BUY 
IN WASHIN 




The MIDDLE of Washington State, 
growing economy based on diversified 
agriculture* and metal industries. t 

The Apple Capital of the World, plus 
1,000,000 new acres of irrigated 
farm lands. 

t Alcoa, Keokuk Electro, and other metal 
industries have selected Wenatchee 
plant sites due to low-cost hydropower 
from the Columbia River dam system. 
More are coming! 



That's AUDIENCE APPEAL: 
We program to our audi- 
ence, with SELECTED top 
network programs plus lo- 
cal color . . . music, news, 
farm shows, sports — the 
things people call about, 
write in for, and partici- 
pate in. 



5000 WATTS 

560 KILOCYCLES 



KPQ's 5000 W, 560 KC combination gets 
way out there, covering Central Washing- 
ton, parts of Oregon, Idaho, and Canada. 
We know because of our regular mail 
from those areas. Then too, we have no 
TV station here, we're separated from 
Seattle by the high Cascade mountains, 
and we're many miles from Spokane. 
YOU CAN'T COVER WASHINGTON 
WITHOUT GETTING IN THE MIDDLE, AND 
THAT'S KPQ Wenatchee, Wash. 



GUARANTEE 

TO OUTPULL all other 

North Central 

Washington media 

TWO to ONE 



National Reps: 
FOR|OE AND CO., INC. 
One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented Stations of Washington State 



Portland and Seattle Reps: 
ART MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



24 



49th ai 



Madisc 



■ 



Radio brand dollar figures 
Congrats on your good article on need- 
ed facts of radio advertising dollars in 
your 27 April 1957 (issue). 

In the true SPONSOR tradition. 

The radio folk should h\ now feel a 
little less inferior and a little less 
ashamed if their numbers are less than 
some other media numbers. 

They're still good — so why hide 'em 
and make people think they're even 
worse? 

Larry Deckinger, 

v.p. and media director, 

Grey Advertising, New York 



Sponsored traffic reports 

Six months ago AWA started rush- 
hour traffic reports direct from New 
Orleans Police Headquarters. These 
were broadcast over local radio sta- 
tions at ten-minute intervals during 
both morning and evening rush hours. 
This also sold a lot. of Georgia- 
Pacific plywood. I wonder if the 
public service they rendered is dulled 
by this fact. We were glad, though to 
note that WWJ apparently did a little 
thinking, too. How long, do you sup- 
pose, before someone in the sales 
department will offer this "find" to a ' 
good Detroit advertiser? Or, would 
that be a sacrilege? 

Aubrey Williams, president, 
Aubrey Williams Advertising 
New Orleans. La. 

• WWJ Expressway Reports referred to by 
Reader William;, are not themselves available lor 
sponsorship. But WWJ advises that the station is 
heartily in favor of judicious sale of public 
sen lee features. 

Information on legal hazards 
I am writing to you at the request of 
an advertising firm here in Memphis 
that is one of your subscribers and 
also a client of mine. 

It seems that some time ago, your 
publication ran an advertisement or 
an article on Professional Liability in- 
surance dealing with plagiarism and 
other related hazards to which adver- 
tising agencies are often exposed. 

If possible, I would appreciate very 
much any information that you could 



MMtNsoi; 



11 MAY 1957 








how to rate high with the small (r\ 



Stations arc finding that they have the kids transfix* d when- 
ever they show Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, and the rest of the 
\\ arner Bros, cartoon gang. The ratings prove it — a healthy 
average of 15.6 in all markets rated by arb so far. I [ere are the 
figures: kbtb, Denver, 10.7: kdlb-tv, Lubbock. 17.3; wabd, 
New York, 12.9: kpho-tv, Phoenix, 12.0; KOIN-tv, Portland, 
Ore., 24.8: kutv, Salt Lake City, 22.9; kens-tv, San Antonio. 



10 B; ki sd-tv, San Di< go, 1 I 9; kr< »n-t San 1 
un\ n. Wichita Tails. 22.1. 

S insors all ovei the countr) an lining up to bti) partici- 
pations in tin se Warni 
I s, Bos K j's, Flav-R-Straws 

name a . I n the b in \our 

with Wain ;e or phone 

cap.- 

Sew 1 '• ^ Ml ■■ :■ H 

CHICAGO • 

DALLAS: U.,1 

LOS MMELES: <8S6 



49TH AND MADISON i mtinued 

give me in regard to these articles, or 
if possible, I would appreciate a copy 
of the issue in which lliev appeared. 

John T. James, Jr. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

■ For ;in Informed discussion of idi- subject 
sec SPONSOR iSKS In the nexl Issue (IK M;.>). 

KOWH, WHB anniversary 

Am reading your April 20 issue in 
flight to Miami — noticed on page 65, 
a stu>\ about SIX STATIONS mark- 
ing their 35th anniversary this spring. 
Two that you neglected to mention 
were KOWH, Omaha and WHB, Kan- 
sas City. They are both celebrating 
their 35th, too. 

Bill Stewart, program director 

KOWH, Omaha 



Zany drawings requested 

Some vears back, I believe you had 
available reprints of a series of Arzy- 
basheff drawings of various characters 
in the broadcast business: account ex- 
ecutive (with sponsor on his tail) ; me- 
dia director (high in the ivory tower) ; 
time buyer, etc. 

My set of these wonderful "things" 
has been gone these many years. Cur- 
rently I have a particular room in the 
agency that is just right for their zany 
touch. 

Are prints available? 
W. Arthur Fielden, v.p. 
Bishopric, Green, Fielden, Miami 

• The drawings < actually by He**) were re- 
printed in 1947. None are available-, but a new 
reprint *ill be done if there is enough reader 
interest. Address recjuests to Reader's Service. 



"An article on every topic" 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank 
you for the prompt attention you gave 
our request for the SPONSOR "All Me- 
dia Evaluation Study." 

It seems that sponsor magazine has 
an article on every topic in which we 
are interested, so therefore, we would 
like to request the following: 

1. "Top Fifty Air Agencies" 12/8/ 
56 

2. "Grey Switches to all Media 
Bu\ ing" 12/15/56 

3. "Top Two Hundred TV Adver- 
tisers, Second Quarter 1956" 8/20 56 

4. "Badio Tune-in Audience Com- 
position Chart" 11/3/56 

Thank you for your cooperation. 
Phillip W. Wenig, research executive 
iional Analysis. Inc.. Philadelphia 

ilahle on articles of unusual 
Interest. Irar Bhects of mosl articles an- .n.til- 
able •-- :i houl charge. 




T 1 N REPET1TI 
REPETITION R€P 



HON 



6CTI 




SPOT 
RADIO 




SPOT 
RADIO 



SATURATION 
CALCULATOR 




FOR YOUR READY-REFERENCE in media-planning, John 
Blair & Company has developed a new Saturation Calculator. At a 
glance it shows time-costs of Saturation Spot Radio in any number 
of major markets up to 100. If you haven't received it yet, write or 
phone your John Blair office for a copy. No charge, of course. 



26 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 






sistence to melt sales resistance 

and these major- market stations have established 
rates providing effective repetition at low cost 



Repetition has long been recognized as 
basic to advertising success. 

But in most media, the price-tag on 
frequent repetition has zoomed into the 
stratosphere. 

So today, when the plans-board asks: 
Within budget limits, how can we build 
effective repetition into our media- 
strategy? . . . 

The sound answer is— SPOT RADIO. 

For only in Spot Radio can most adver- 
tisers afford repetition at the effective 
evel known as Saturation. 

Through Saturation, your selling-idea is 
•epeated so frequently and so emphatically 
hat it reaches all your customers — reaches 



them again and again until your telling- 
idea becomes their buying- idea. 

Because Saturation in Spot Radio pays- 
off for the advertiser, Blair-representod 
stations have established attractive rates 
on saturation-schedules. 

And John Blair & Company has devel- 
oped the new Saturation Calculator, shown 
at the left. At a glance it shows how many 
major markets can be covered with a spe- 
cific budget— how often— and for how long. 

A call to the nearest John Blair office 
will bring your copy of the Calculator— 
and detailed information on methods of 
applying the full power of Repetition in 
reaching your sales-goals for 19f>7. 



OHN 

LAIR 

COMPANY 



JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



OFFICES: 



NEW YORK 
ATLANTA 



CHICAGO 
DALLAS 



BOSTON 
LOS ANGELES 



DETROIT 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ST. LOUIS 
SEATTLE 



Exclusive National Representatives for 



Y.k wabc 

'>«(. WLS 

dtthia WFIL 



WXYZ 

WHDH 

Ft cisco KGO 

>u4i WWSW 

« KXOK 

liiton WWDC 

i* : WFBR 

Un. Worth KLIF-KFJZ 



Minneapolis-St. Paul. . .WDGY 

Providence WPRO 

Seattle KING 

Houston KTRH 

Cincinnati WCPO 

Kansas City WHB 

Miami WQAM 

New Orleans WDSU 

Portland, Ore KGW 

Louisville WKLO 

Indianapolis WIBC 



Birmingham WAPI 

Columbus WBNS 

San Antonio KTSA 

Tampa WFLA 

Albany-Schenectady- 

Troy WTRY 

Memphis WMC 

Phoenix KOY 

Omaha WOW 

Jacksonville WJAX 

Knoxville WNOX 



Wheeling WWVA 

Nashville vVSM 

Binghamfon WNBF 

Fresno KFRE 

Wichita KFH 

Tulsa KRMG 

Orlando WDBO 

Savannah WSAV 

Wichita Falls- 

Amarillo KWFT-KLYN 

Bismarck KFYR 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



27 





KOWH, Omaha, is first in audi 
ence 246 out of 264 Pulse daytime 
quarter-hours.* That's a domi- 
nance story ii' you've ever seen one. 

KOWH is first in the morning, . . . 
and first in the afternoon, says 
Pulse . . . for an all-day first place 
average of 31.0^ • 

This is the kind of leadership 
KOWH has been putting at the 
service of many national and local 
advertisers for the past six years 

This is the kind of leadership 
KOWH can put at your service, 
either through the good offices ol 
Adam Young, Inc., or General 
Manager Virgil Sharpe. 

"Pulse, 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday- 
Saturday, March 1957 



KOWH 

OMAHA 



The Storz Stations 



TODD STORZ, 

President 



WDGY 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 

Kansas City 



WQAM 
Miami 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



28 



KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 

SPONSOR • 11 MAY 195 



J. 



SPONSOR 




HOW COMPTON'S MARKETING-MEDIA 
TEAM LAUNCHED PRODUCT X 

Case history of new household brand which us«*> television 

exclusively shows how marketing helps shape the media strategy 



i- marketing service a high-domed 
frill which agencies trot out for pres- 
entations and then kick upstairs once 
there- real advertising work to be 
done? 

I- it something to throw up to cli- 
ents when agenc) compensation is 
questioned? Or is it a day-to-da) 
\ workhorse? 

You can t tell from the outside look- 
| i tiii in. 

The best wa\ to get the feel of this 
thing railed marketing service is to 
trace it through the actual case histon 



of a product, sponsor this week i hose 
Compton as the agenc) to work with 
for a closeup look at marketing serv- 
ices on one brand. I hi- agency, with 
it- $70 million billings «'<»'- air me- 
dia) i- large enough to run with the 
leaders; l>ut it's not so large that what 
it does is atypical for all hut the top 
lew agencies. 

i For a series on the agenc) market- 
ing trend in broad perspective, 
is-ues id' sponsor 9 January-10 Octo- 
ber 1956.) 

The product whose case history 



SPONSOR traced it Compton 'call it 
Product \ - ti ew brand. \- it hap- 
pens, it's i pi odu< t which has 
ie|e\ ision exclusive!) from it- inl 
duction about a yeai a-i> through to 
todaj when Product \ ' - 
.'ii several network t\ shows. 

Here'- hoW I OmptOn helped 

this product from the laboratory to 
national distribution and how the 
cy's marketing, media .\n<\ radio- 
t\ programing department- worked as 
a team in developing and executing 
advertising strategy for I'p'dmt \. 



SPONSOR 



11 M\Y 19.S7 



29 



Product X had $1,500,000 to spend tor a 

national campaign. Media recommended tv, then the 

marketing-media team chose cities together 



I. 



thing flows 



I In nk stage: At Compton, every- 
from the account execu- 
tive. He's the source of all client in- 
formation, at least at the first stage of 
the game, and at all times is the clear- 
ing house for contact and information 
provided by the agency services. 

So. when Product X went from the 
client company's labs to a product 
manager's desk, this was the first step: 
An account group was assigned to the 
agency account executive. The group 
included men from media, program- 
ing, copy, research — a marketing man. 

After a general briefing on client 
aims, the account executive talked at 
greater length with the marketing man 
— one of 15 marketing executives un- 
der Bill Nevin, v. p. in charge of mar- 
keting. Then the marketing man went 
to work. 

"He'd learned product fundamentals 
from the account executive, knew the 
profit expectancy, and client objec- 
tives," said Nevin. "He then went on 
to get industry information. Example: 
sales trends for products of the same 
category as Product X which come 



from Compton's research department 
and from trade journals" 

He consulted the brand manager of 
Product X and other client executives 
in sales and production suggested b\ 
the brand manager at the sponsor firm. 
And he took field trips to supplement 
this knowledge with trade reactions. 

By the time he finished compiling 
information, he knew who would buy 
the product, where and why. 

Virtually simultaneously with his re- 
search, the creative department was 
sweating out a copy approach. They 
found that Product X had demonstra- 
ble superiority and that women buying 
this type of product want to know 
reasons why. 

Then the media department could go 
to work with all the facts in hand. 

"The associate media director on 
Product X summarized the marketing 
and copy strategy in relation to me- 
dia." Frank Kemp, media v.p., told 
SPONSOR. "Then he and the buyer 
talked about the way marketing and 
copy approaches related to media. This 
discussion took place about three or 



four months before we were read) to 
go into the test market operation;" 

The media men distilled the follow- 
ing basics from the available data: 

1. Product \ is a household prod- 
uct, bought and used b) women. 

2. It's retailed through super mar- 
kets and other grocer) outlets and is 
competitivel) priced to be a mass-ap- 
peal product. 

3. The consumer purchase studs re- 
vealed a slight urban prejudice in the 
buying pattern, so the campaign would 
natural]) concentrate on urban areas. 

4. The buying cycle seemed to be 
approximately one purchase weekb b\ 
the average consumer. 

5. It had a visually demonstrable 
superiority. 

"These facts, combined with other 
market data and a copy strategy 
spelled out daytime network tv pro- 
graming to us," says Frank Kemp, "at 
least, in a national campaign." 

The Compton media department at 
this point started drawing up a media 
strategy for Product X. After sum- 
marizing the marketing and copy 
points which determined their think- 
ing, the) plunged into the broad rec- 
ommendations. 

"Tv should be Brand X"s basic me- 
dium for mass coverage," wrote the 
associate media director who was as- 



AcCOUnt group ' s headed by account executive, John Cross, at head of table. Agenc) service departments an- all 
represented in the group. Discussing new tv campaign are (1. to r.) Henry Clochessy, assoc. media dir.; John Egan. 
exec, producer; Vera Oskey, copy group head; Cross; Lawrence Horner, mktng exec; Bob Jacoby. research super*. 
Executives shown in these pictures are not necessarily working on Product X. since identity of brand is being shielded 




signed t" the introductorj campaign 
Producl \. !!<• then spelled oul the 
. r i — v^ li \ of l\ iii terms ol potential 
frequenc) of advertising message, rel- 
ative cost-per-M f"r \ ar i< >u- potential 
buys, four-week audience. 

• \\ r usuall) consider ;i L 3- week in- 
troductory campaign tin- basic mini- 
mum," Kemp told ^n.\M>i{. "That 
th introdueton campaign seemed 
ni Product X's purchase pattern, 
tin- average consumer buys such 
i product about once ,i week or every 
Had the new product been an 
ippliance, nr other infrequentl) pur- 
■ I item, we'd have thought in 
- of a nine-months 01 even \ear- 
introducton campaign, >ince 
.in original campaign should span 
three or four cycles of buying for 
ii t." 
Producl \ s introductory campaign 
in make the brand which known 
i-t. "'One of the li»'-l ways to do this 
with 20-second chainbreaks where 
iir media are concerned," savs 
wemp. "But that's where the c<>]>\ 
t rat eg) comes in to guide us. If copy 
i ater length, we might as well 
et 20's, no matter how effective 
might be in just getting the brand 
ame known. Also, if we're talking 
demonstrable product advan- 
- as we were with Product X, we'll 
•infiltrate on tv. not radio." 
The budget for the introduction of 
roduct X nationally was $1.5 million. 
his meant that if tv was to be used. 
ntire budget would have to go into 
tedium to do an adequate job. 
"Since we were working out Prod- 
\ - media strategy about three or 
ur months before Product X was 
ady for test markets." Kemp told 
'ONSOR, "this meant that the market- 
g department actually began work on 
oduct X close to six months before 
I W market time. We had a three-year 
,-edia plan, since we consider three 
Jars the pay-out period in this case. 
tie client realized that he'd be spend- 
jg more than expected revenue during 
r introductory period, but antici- 
ites profits after the first three '\ears 
I e over." 







Marketing men go i" work first on new i ml "i product, aftei briefing bom 

a/eon client aims, profit expectant-). Hill Nevin (1.) v.p. charge of marketing, help* 
Larry Horner, one of 15 Compton mark, itives in mappi 




Media executives base recommendatioiu on data: marketing ploj copj i 

Manner S< ulfurt • r. > or another "( five associate media directors, i- u Ben 

product account group, responsible to Prank K> mp, media v. p., and t" accoun) 



On the air: Once all the strategy 

oposals — marketing, copy and media 

were formulated, the account group 

shed them out critically. The plans 

ye also reviewed by the client brand 

Programing decisions, made by Lewis Titter- 
t"ii. v.p. of radio-tv (r.) and John Egan. executive 
producer, are also guided by client marketing aims 




manager and he added his suggestion^, 
particularly where the marketing an- 
alysis was concerned. 

Then client, account executive and 
marketing man worked together to 
pick a dozen or so potential test mar- 
kets from which the final two were to 
be chosen by media. 

"We would have help of! on getting 
availabilities from reps even if we had 
determined the test markets by then," 
Kemp told SPONSOR. "In a test cam- 
paign particularly it's verj important 
to keep the competition from knowing 
about it, since they could have come 
into those markets and thrown off all 
our findings for Product X." 

\\ hile the media department worked 
further on determining ways to give 
the test market campaign the same 
weight as the eventual national cam- 
paign I particularly since national plans 
called for heavy daytime network tv), 
the marketing man went to work on 
criteria for the test markets. He con- 
sidered a number of aspects about the 
market: 

• It had to be representative of the 
total market. 

• It had to have an adequate client 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

SPONSOR traces development of mar- 
keting strategy and introductory tv 
campaign for an actual new Compton 
product to show how marketing relates 
to other agency services. Marketing 
takes Product X from client lab into 
stores and advertising promotes sales. 

sales force covering the territory . 

• This sales force had to be rela- 
tive!) unburdened with problems on 
other products to be able to handle the 
extra work involving Product X's in- 
troduction. 

• The city had to be measurable 
(one in which there were no cross 
shipments because the major conclu- 
sions of the campaign were to be 
drawn from a tracing of shipments!. 
That way the client would control the 
number of cases per 1,000 population 
before, during and after the advertis- 
ing effort. 

"The media department gets into the 
selection of test markets mainly on the 
basis of a veto power," says Kemp. 
"The picking of the dozen or so was 
actually done by the client sales de- 
partment and our marketing people." 




Responsibility of marketing executives is to the account executives and top manage- 
ment. Conferring with Compton president Bart Cummings < at de*k i are (1. to r. > Bill 
Nevin, market development v.p.; Bill Stewart, acct. superv. : < '.. James Fleming, exec, 
v.p.; John Cross, acct. exec. Major market decisions may involve top management 



32 



Media had to pick two markets from 
a dozen presented to them by the ac- 
count executive. Testing is generally 
done in two or more markets as a safe- 
guard against competitive couponing 
in one as the result of a leak. 

For the Product X campaign, media 
looked for a market with two or more 
tv stations so that the campaign would 
be a fair test of media buy ing and 
have normal media competition. 

"The next problem," Kemp told 
SPONSOR, "was to duplicate network 
daytime tv locally. What we decided 
to do was to cut Product X into the 
clients existing network tv show-. 
which the product was destined to 
share in eventually anyhow. If we 
hadn't found markets where this was 
possible, we might have had to buv 
local daytime programing of compar- 
able ratings weight as network." 

Once the dates for the sampling cam- 
paign and the advertising were deter- 
mined, media went in to shop for time, 
but as close to the starting date as pos- 
sible "without jeopardizing our spot 
buying possibilities." 

The test campaign for Product X 
I Please turn to page 86) 



DO SPONSORS NEED 
AGENCY MARKETING? 

sponsor has been checking admen for the 
answer, including agencies at the 4A's, 
Compton for this story, others over recent 
months. What their thinking boils doun to: 



1. Impartial, rather than company-inbred, 
thinking in marketing provokes more inci- 
sive planning in today's competitive mar- 
kets. Sophisticated, giant air advertisers 
use agency marketing counsel, like adver- 
tising developed in marketing framework. 



2. Marketing as an additional agency serv- 
ice helps maintain the balance between 
commissions paid to the agency and serv- 
ices rendered. There's great flexibility 
in this area of client-agency relations, de- 
pending upon profitability of the account. 



3. Clients themselves have become more 
marketing-conscious, and the trend toward 
product-manager organization within cli- 
ent offices has broadened client admen's 
responsibilities to marketing, sales, pro- 
duction know-how as well as advertising. 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




^* ■- 



.: .-.•.■ 



'J 



GE WOWS A COMMUNITY WITH MUSIC 

A frankly commercial public relations song, "Kentucky," pulls in letters, 
compliments and plenty of good-will for new GE plant in Louisville 



■ ere's how General Electric used 
adio and a catchy song to make its 
»u plant at Louisville. K\.. an accept- 
ed and welcomed member of the com- 
iiinit) . 

Ihe problem: GE had ju-t opened 
is new multi-million dollar Appliance 
'ark in Louisville and was in the posi- 
ion of being a "stranger in town." 

Following GE's over-all polic\ of 
nakitiii new plants in new locations an 
_ral part of the community, the 
inn's executives cooperated in civic 
rejects and activities. However, the 
.ouisville operation went one step fur- 
her in its public relations effort. 

I . K. Rieger. Appliance Park v. p. 
ml general manager, and L. II. 
leans, manager of employee and com- 
lunit) relations, decided to sell the 
<w plant to the people of Kentucky by 
mch the same methods used to sell 
I. products to sa\ it with music. 



George R. Nelson, Inc.. which pro- 
duces singing commercial- for GE's 
major appliances and other divisions, 
was called in to work up a song for 
the campaign. Nelson came up with 
a melodic wait/ (ailed "Kentucky.' 

Soon "Kentucky" was being played 
on every radio station in Louisville 
and throughout western Kentucky. 
Juke boxes began carrying the song 
and music stoic- wen- stocking the 
recording. I!\ January "Kentucky" 
had become number two on the local 
bit parade. 

Interesting sidelight to the public's 
acceptance is the fact thai aside from 
being an ode to the "blue grass -late. *' 

Songsmith Georg N laon 
used \vjltz-time. praised Ken- 
tacky, mixed in references to 

GE and came up with a "hit" 




the lyrics "I the song definitely consti- 
tute .1 '"' ommen ial." < d ind • -1 - 
pride in Kentucky are mentioned lil>- 
ei.ilK throughout two oi the three 
stanzas. 

I lie local Stations and the cue 

rex eived main lettei - i omplimenl 

xal Electi ic and asking for < opies 
of the recording. (Some of the letters 
re< ei\ ed are show n ab< 

'I'd. - ' i I lectrii - 

public relations effort set t" tl 
quarter time is evidenced not onrj b) 
letters from listeners bul also bj ■ 
number of inquiries from other com- 
panies, including Procter v\ Gamble, 
v ho w mi to know how it's 
to take a frankK commercial 

and make it ,i top hit. 

From sponsor's analysis of letters 
sent in l'\ listeners, the key seems to 

be a warm appeal to "native son pride 
combined with a darned good tune. ^ 




Sponsor's Colors and insignia are carried on station cars driven by farm director Wayne Liles (1), assistant farm director Jack Tompkins 

THEY BOUGHT THE 

WHOLE KIT AND KABOODLE 

Evergreen feed firm buys entire farm activities of Oklahoma station, builds 
shows, retail contacts, commercials around two television farm specialists 



I he added oomph given to tv and 
radio advertising by station farm di- 
rectors is well appreciated (or should 
be) by admen. 

It should not surprise anybody, 
therefore, if an advertiser buys up all 
the activities of a station's farm de- 
partment. This would be no more 
than carrying such appreciation to its 
logical conclusion. 

Obviously, such "logical" conclu- 
sions do not take place every day in 
the week. When they do, they are 
worth looking into. 

One such instance is in its second 
year on the air. The client involved is 
Evergreen Mills of Ada, Okla., makers 
of feeds for poultry, hogs and cattle. 
During the past year Evergreen had 
been sponsoring a weekday quarter- 
hour strip plus two half-hour Sat- 
urday shows on KWTV, Oklahoma 
City, plus a quarter-hour strip on 
KOMA in the same market. 

It might be an exaggeration to say 
that if Evergreen had more money it 



would have sponsored more time, but 
it is accurate to say that its total ad 
budget in the market went to the two 
outlets listed. 

The roster of time bought repre- 
sents more or less the skeleton of 
Evergreen's ad campaign, which has 
been renewed, by the way, on KWTV. 
What Evergreen really bought was a 
complete merchandising package. 

The heart of this package consists of 
Wayne Liles, farm director, and Jack 
Tompkins, assistant farm director, of 
KWTV. The pair were signed up by 
the client via Galloway-Wallace of 
Oklahoma City in April 1956. Con- 
tract terms embodied a 52-week pack- 
age calling for farm reporting and 
farm feature shows on both tv and ra- 
dio (at the time KOMA was the 
radio affiliate of KWTV). 

Insofar as the tv station was con- 
cerned, Evergreen bought all the farm 
activities in sight. And so, when Liles 
and Tompkins aren't working on pro- 
graming they're selling for Evergreen. 



Here's a summary of what Ever- 
green originally bought: 

• Two Monday-through-Friday farm 
reporter shows, one on tv, one on ra- 
dio, both 15 minutes long. Both shows 
were on around midday, to which time 
they were moved recently from early 
morning slots after it was decided that 
noontime listening is more convenient 
for the farmer. Liles has been tele- 
casting the KWTV Farm Reporter for 
three vears. 

• Two contiguous Saturday video 
shows, both 30 minutes in length, be- 
ginning at 12:30 p.m. The emphasis 
on farm youth on both shows is 
pointed and unmistakable. There is 
probably no other sector of the popu- 
lation which can be pinpointed with 
such accuracy as the young farm pop- 
ulation. Working through such organ- 
izations as the 4-H Clubs, Future 
Farmers of America and Future Home- 1 
makers of America, which are exploit- 
ed on the two shows, the advertiser! 
can be sure he is talking to prospects 



34 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



man) oi %s I %s i 1 1 be prime customers 

in five <>i I" years. 

• Two experienced hands to man- 
., , programing. Liles is .1 graduate 
oi Oklahoma \\M College in Animal 
Husbandry, lia- been a production 

marketing administrator, a coiintv 
v was instrumental in forming 
Oklahoma's firsl soil testing labora- 
tory active in the Hereford Breeder's 
Association and presidrnl of the Okla- 
homa Count) Agents Assn. before 
coming t" K.W I \ . Tompkins i- a grad- 
uate "I lexas \WI. u,h an assistant 
count) agenl for the Texas Agricul- 
tural I xtension Service and active in 
tv and radio farm broadcasting before 
coming to ( Oklahoma. 

• \ host "I merchandising extras. 
F01 example, cars used b) the two 
farm reporters (the) rack up 1,000 
miles a week cadi in their travels 
around the state), are painted with the 

green color scheme and trade- 
mark. The two men hold meetings 
with Evergreen salesmen, who regu- 
larh receive sales aids featuring farm 
department programs and activities. 
Large three-color posters displaying 
pictures of the two farm reporters and 
program time- along with advertising 
mats for tie-in newspaper ads are avail- 
able to all Evergreen dealers. Station- 
er) and jumbo postcards with the 
Evergreen name on them are used for 
mailings b) the farm department. All 
js releases about the farm depart- 
ment and notification of special pro- 
gram events are sent regularl) to all 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Evergreen, a livestock feed manufac 
turcr bought the entire farm activities 
of KWTV, Oklahoma City to sell its 
products. Buy includes services of 
farm experts Wayne Liles and Jack 
Tompkins, who travel widely and repre- 
sent Evergreen both on and off the air. 

Evergreen dealers covered bj the 
broadcasts. \ bi-monthl) publication, 

called the kll II iirijirru liinn Re 

port, outlining Bpe< :ial activities and 
accomplishments "I the depai tmenl are 

sent to newspapers and provided to 

salesmen for distribution to dealers. 

• The added pumh fai m repoi ters 
give to commercials. Liles and Tomp- 
kins appear in the film testimonials l>v 
farmers of Evergreen feed-. The for- 
mat of these testimonials i- u-uallv an 
interview with fanners b) one "f the 
two farm reporters. The two men also 

-ive voice-over commercial-, with film 

in slide plus straight live commercials 
with livestock and feed bags a- props. 
One series of commercials involved 
the weekl) weighing of nine Hamp- 
shire hog> raised hv F.iles and Tomp- 
kins on Evergreen's Formula #77. 
Following the series, two of the hogs 
were given ;h prizes at a local live- 
stock show, two wen- dim. Med to a 
boys' home and the others were 
slaughtered for anal) sis. 

The results ol Evergreen's sponsor- 
ship? While it i- difficult to measure 



in in area m hi< h incl 
drought-sl 1 ii ken 1 ittle 1 ant hi 
ibl) up last fall, ii 
ported, and the Ada plant had its 

■ r . • . 1 1 1 • limi month in ' •■ toba I he 
best testimonial ol sales effe* tivem 

..11 the 

K\\ I \ renewal l.v i 
denl Han, Lund lard. 

Sim • farm pn dry 

rvice fe ituri the oi covet 

topics |,i..\ i.|. - 

measure >.f it- qualit) . I he farn 
P«. 1 1.1 Bhows and the bi 1 - itur- 

da) aftei noon progi ims ned 

to ^ive farmers and ran< hers 1 1 
plete pi. hue of agi it ultural bappen- 
( Oklahoma. 

In addition, the I nrrn Reporter pro- 
vide- on-the-spot him coverage and 
remote broadi asts from important 
tional events. Among the musts for 
out-of-state covet the national 

I I \ convention, the \m.i i. an Royal 

Livestoi k Show and 1 II < luh < onfer- 
ence in Kansas Cit) in < •. tober, the 
International Livestock show and I II 
' ii- in 1 In. ago in November, the 
National Western Livestock Show in 
Denver in Januarv and the South- 
western I ivestock Show in Fort Worth 
in Februai ) . \\ hen President I 
hower visited areas suffering from 
drought, the K\\ I \ nent 

pio\ ided • ompli ti 

Last spring the department 
tered a plane to enable it- two re- 
porters to .over the man) state I i\ »■- 
-lock shows, a number of whi< 



Direct broadcast from 1 hicago 111 1 lab Congress to Oklahoma 
Qtj stations k\\T\ and k<>\l\. Liles (with telephone) and 
Tompkins (standing) interview delegates as part of the pa 









Farm reporters Wayne Li] I) and Jack Tompkin- >.n 

set used t"r tluir daily k\\ 1\ noontime fann - S 'ially 

used to gi\>- visual impact to market r- 




Illi:!!ll!lll!!!ll!llllll!!lllllll 



HOW TO MAKE FOOD LOOK 
ITS BEST ON COLOR TV 

Von's Grocery Co. of Los Angeles, sponsor of KRCA's After- 
noon Movie, switched to color transmission in February. Co- 
sponsoring with Von's are a number of food processors and 
distributors. Color problems presented by their commercials 
centered about: 1) color definition and readability of pack- 
aged products and; 2 I techniques for rendering meats, produce 
and delicatessen appealing and tempting. Here are some work- 
ing conclusions arrived at by the Dan B. Miner Co., Von's 
agency, the grocery chain and KRCA, Los Angeles, based on 
a joint, full-scale test of color commercials. 

GROCERIES 

Mass shots of packages prove unsatisfactory unless the colors 
and juxtapositions are closely controlled. The problem here is 
one of adjustment for an extreme variation in color and 
brightness. When displayed with intense colors (such as red), 
dull colors (browns, purples) will appear even duller. A slow 
pan shot or individual products displayed alone, show pack- 
ages to their best advantage. Certain packages televise ex- 
tremely well. Occasionally retouching of lettering helps. In 
general, a package with few, well-defined colors comes across 
best. Off whites are superior to pure whites when juxtaposed 
with strong colors, and resist bleeding. 

PRODUCE 

The color camera will detect off-colors and exaggerate an 
un- or over-ripe product. Produce should be at the peak of 
ripeness and freshness (particularly bananas and tomatoes). 
In massed product shots, strong colors (dark green of parsley, 
red of pepper) stand out sharply. Browns are satisfactory, 
but yellows tend to fade when close to strong colors. In some 
instances yellows and greens displayed together tend to fuse 
rather than stand-out sharply. This indicates great care in the 
preparation of salads for live tv. Bunched produce (carrots, 
parsley) should be completely wet down, potatoes, sweet 
potatoes and beets appear better in their natural state. 

M EATS 

Meat should be freshly cut, or blotted with a clean towel to 
keep it from turning a darker brown and to remove the appear- 
ance of blood from the surface. Green (parsley or outer 
lettuce leaves) are a good contrasting background. Plates 
should be a neutral pale color, but never blue. Gray or beige 
are best. Plates with uneven floral designs in blues, purples 
or reds should be avoided since from certain angles the 
designs will appear as bloody juices running from the meat. 
Pork loses in contrast to the hearty red of beef and should 
be displayed alone. Medium and close shots of fowl present 
a problem in the bluish, unappetizing cast of the fowl's flesh. 
Tli is can be eliminated by shooting from the same side as 
the light source, which produces a warm cast. 






36 



mini 



jiiij.: until ' I in..::.:.,:., ;;.;..;; m y 



EVERGREEN continued . . . 
at the same time. During the spring of 
1956, Liles and Tompkins covered 
5,000 miles and came back with filmed 
reports on 32 county and three district 
livestock shows. 

The two Saturdav shows are done 
live, with Liles handling the first and 
Tompkins the second. If one is out of 
town gathering information, the other 
is prepared to take over. 

The first show, 4-H on Parade, goes 
on from 12:30 to 1:00 p.m. Its format 
provides for a quiz contest on farm 
topics among 4-H Clubs followed by 
amateur acts by club members. The 
show recently was used for an unusual 
contest. It was a livestock judging 
contest with the animals shown on 
film. More than 4.300 4-H and FFA 
members were enrolled in the contest. 
Those entering were required to recog- 
nize and rank the qualities of various 
livestock shown on the Saturday 
show as well as the weekday programs. 

The second show, the Saturday 
Farm Show, features FFA and FHA 
youth. Activities of FFA groups are 
discussed during the first quarter hour. 
Three boys and an instructor from an 
FFA group are guests each week. They 
are interviewed and usually talk over 
a three- to five-minute film about an 
outstanding project of theirs. 

The format of the second 15 min- 
utes is turned over to the distaff side, 
with FHA chapter members present- 
ing on alternate weeks live and film 
reports on such subjects as homemak- 
ing and fashions. 

This type of programing alternates 
with the honoring of a farm family. 
The family is presented live along with 
a film presentation showing such mate- 
rial as a farm home, modernization of 
farm activities and how various mem- 
bers of the family contribute to run- 
ning the farm and home. 

Most Evergreen feeds are adver- 
tised on a year-round basis, though | 
there are seasonal pushes. As a rule, 
all feeds are advertised at least once a 
month, if onlv to remind the farmer of 
the Evergreen name. Dairy cattle are 
fed the year round and. because of the 
mild weather conditions in Oklahoma. 
hogs have two litters a year, which 
also calls for year-round feeding. Beef 
cattle, however, involve heavy feeding 
from 1 December to 1 April. Poultry 
feeding also has its seasonal aspects 
with feed for baby chicks being pushed 
during the summer and early fall and 
growing feeds pushed during the fall 
and winter. ^ 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




Piel's commercials on t\ and radio helped -pur radio corned) 
nercial trend. Henry J. Muessen, Piel's president (right), 



poses tiere with Salvadoi I >.i 1 1 who baa drawn mustache on mythi- 
cal "ll.in\ Piel." Muessen i- i>(T to I" nvention in 1 



SHOULD YOU GET ON RADIO'S 

COMEDY COMMERCIAL BANDWAGON? 

)ozeus of clients already have. But before you make the move 

check your market. vour product imagi and your own sense of humor 



< A 

#%dvertising trends generally starl 

hen someone successful!) breaks the 
says Dun Calhoun, creative di- 
sctoi at McCann-Erickson. 

I In' rule that uot broken: Humor 
is do business in a radio commercial. 

The trend: \ rash of light-hearted, 
gbJy creative copy that lias spread 

er the past few months to a point 
here 1>\ this week radio listeners of- 
»i found it hard to tell commercials 

"u programing i See list of light- 
'nt'h commercials, page 39). 

On WNEW, New York, one of those 
Mtions that frequently turns out to be 
I bellwether for broadcasting trends 



By W. F. Miksch 

across the country, at least 15 advertis- 
ers out of about 100 are using paro- 
dies, corned) -kit-, and other light- 
touch material to sell products ran| 
from coffee to auto-. 

Newspaper columnists and magazine 
writer- arc taking note of this ren- 
aissance in creative radio commercial-. 
Di-k jockeys take extra seconds to 
chuckle over and comment on humor- 
ous ct."- after playing them. Fan mail 
for the commercials is streaming into 
-tations and clients. \nd the kid- who 
a short while ago were singing "Won- 
der where the yellow went.'" are now 
reciting in Chinese style, "Please to 



hear helpful word- '• 

Lth from < ho ' ho S 5 or 

other catch-phrases from the • 
ol commercials. 

M< inwhile, radi pj n ritei - 

flexing their funny-bones. Clients who 
took a dim \iew of anything short 
of the most straightforward - 

givil !"in t.. ii-'- am 

itive art form— including burnt 
t" gel attention. 

If entertainment i- the wa\ to 
listenership, then whj should] 
radio advertiser gel on the corned] 
commercial bandwagon? The proba- 
bility i- that a lot who shouldn't will 



>NSOR 



11 MAY 195^ 



: 




Ill 



if your product is . . . 

for pleasure. Beverages, ciga- 
rette-, candy can profit mosl 
from commercials of happy type 

inexpensive. To be pompous and 
serious over a nickel candy bar 
can make an ad sound ridiculous 

like most others. When you can't 
resort to medical claims or really 
outstanding features, try lightness 




SHOULD YOU USE THE LIGHT TOUCH? 



NO 



if your product is . . . 

<lc;ifl serious. Life insurance or 
cemetery lots hardly, lend them- 
selves to comic advertising copy 

brand new. Introducing the new 
product may well require a more 
serious approach than comedy skit 

totally different. If your product 
merits hard, serious sell, don't 
take chances on trying to !»■ funny 



hi? 



If you try humor, be prepared to switch 
commercials frequently. Oft-told jokes get stale 



do just that. And a lot who should 
won't. 

Perhaps the light-touch commercial 
is for you. But before you jump to 
that conclusion, make sure it suits 
your product image and marketing 
aims. Above all, be sure the humor 
copy is in the best of taste and han- 
dled with the dexterity that this art 
form requires. So w r arn the men who 
know — the copy chiefs and copy writ- 
ers, in fact, who are turning out the 
top light-touch commercials today. 

The advantages of a light-hearted 
approach to selling are many, but the 
pitfalls are just as numerous. The type 
of product, or the brand of humor 
copy can bring such a campaign top- 
pling down just as the theme of a play 
or the quality of its writing can cause 
a theatrical flop. 

"Sponsors have multimillion-dollar 
investments in their brand images and 
in their product reputations," Bernard 
Pagenstecher, v. p. at Young & Rubi- 
cam, wrote in SPONSOR (20 April, 
page 54). '"If they switch to a humor- 
ous campaign without painstaking 
study and soul-searching, they may in- 
vite disaster. Few advertising fates 
Id be worse than to wind up estab- 
ing the product merely as being 
le by a sponsor with a wonderful 
se of humor." 
Pagenstecher is in a good position 



to speak on this subject. Many admen 
feel that it was the account that he 
supervises, Piel's Beer, that had most 
to do with getting the comedy com- 
mercial bandwagon rolling. The char- 
acters of Bert and Harry Piel, con- 
ceived and written by Ed Graham and 
portrayed by tv-radio actors Bob 
Goulding and Ray Elliott, got their 
first airing on radio and television 
about a year ago. Bert and Harry 
were an instant hit with the public and 
their popularity continues high. The 
most ardent fans in Eastern markets 
where these commercials run keep tab 
on times when they are slotted, tune 
in just to catch their act. What's more 
important they go out and buy Piel's, 
says Pagenstecher. 

Beer is a product which is associ- 
ated with pleasure, so the "pleasant" 
commercial is appropriate. But to at- 
tempt to sell something as inherently 
serious as life insurance with humor 
copy is obviously inappropriate. 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Humor, once considered taboo in radio 
commercials, is now being added in in- 
creasing doses. Irritation, once consid- 
ered vital ingredient, is being removed. 
Clients and agencies have learned 
"hard-sell" can get better listenership 
when administered with sugar-coating. 



What type of products, then, can 
use humor commercials effectively? 

"Light-touch copy can work well 
with products about which there is less 
to say competitively," says Guild Cope- 
land, creative director at Ted Bates. 
"Also for product lines with a small 
budget. The entertaining commercial 
extends the audience rather than deep- 
ening the sell." It gets more listeners, 
holds their attention longer, thereby 
giving the advertiser more useful time 
to get his message across. 

Cigarettes and beer are both good 
examples of products with little to say 
which distinguishes them from their 
competition. Washington is alert to 
see that they do not make medical 
claims. They can talk about good to- 
bacco, fine hops, flip-top boxes, filter 
tips, quart cans and real taste. Since 
none of these embody the elements of 
hard-sell through proven superiority, 
an ideal alternative is to establish a 
friendly feeling for the product. This 
can be accomplished better with a slap- 
stick than a sledge. 

Irritation or shock in commercials, 
once favorably regarded as stimuli to 
purchasing, are fast losing ground in 
copywriting circles. This is reflected 
even in singing jingle commercials 
which are becoming more and more 
tuneful, sometimes surpassing pop 
tunes in beauty. 

The old, repetitive "irritation" com- 
mercial was met head-on by a listener 
reaction called "selective inattention," 
many admen will tell you. People auto- 
matically closed their ears to it so the 
shouts became inaudible whispers. 

"When you lull a listener into a 
commercial rather than shock him into 
it. subconscious tune-out ends," says 
Jack Grogan, program manager for 
WNEW, New York, himself a 20-v ear 
veteran in both the field of commer- 
cials and programing. Grogan has 
written many light commercials and 
jingles, and his advice is frequently 
sought by agencies. The trend to light- 
touch commercials delights him. 

"There are a lot of forward thinkers 
in agencies today," he told sponsor. 
"They are putting all the freshness, 
creativity and imagination of the best- 
type programing into one-minute tran- 
scriptions. 

"This trend may raise the stature 
• and the salaries) of the radio com- 
mercial copywriters," Grogan said, 
it can also reactivate the careers of 
many actors." Parker Fennelly, who 
has been almost in eclipse since the old 
.la\s of "Allen's Alley" on radio, is 



38 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



now a shining stat through his role "f 
Fi t u - Patch on the Pepperidge Bread 
commercials, D.j.'a all over are 
"dropping" his name in connection 
h iili the commercials. 

Another plus factor f«»r the "liidit- 
touch" i- thai ~ 1 1 • » w personalities are 
taking extra seconds of air time t>> ex- 
press their appreciation. Nol long ago, 
KYL, Salt Lake City, broadcast a I i 
minute show made up aolel) <>f com- 
mercials, all created l>\ Stan Freberg 
and played '"for entertainment only." 
Contadina, Zellerbach Paper, Snow- 
draft ami Stokele] Frozen Foods all 
got free air time. Small wonder that 

clients are coming to ie-e\aluate hu- 
mor in radio cop) . 

Hut Grogan and mam others point 

out that there i- a lot more to ;i hu- 
morous campaign than just climbing 

on the bandwagon. For one thin-, the 



client \\ ho i- c ontemplating i iding the 
trend should he prepared i" r« "id .1 
number of variations and not just stick 
with one commercial. "' \ joke has less 

effect each time yOU hi. 11 it. In- - 

I h- also stresses the fat t th.it humoi 

i- a fragile art and must at all time- 
he kept within the bounds of ■ I 

programing taste. Here are some ba- 
sics which he Bug ;ests and whir h were 
coi roborated b) copj men h ho have 
themselves created light-touch com- 
mercials: 

1. I imi'i use horrible Bounds as at- 
tention-getters. The) irritate-. \ ma- 
chine gun, for example, i- something 
that too man) people have beard in 
actualit) Bince the starl ol World W.n 

1 1, rhose w bo ha\ e h ill hardl) asso- 
ciate it- Bound effect « ith humoi . 

2. Death is never funny. Not in 
-hort take-, at lea-t. Ilileheoek or a 



pla) like " irsenii and ui.l I 
could achieve 1 macabre humoi in the 

6 of an If. 111 ..1 tWO. But it 

he 1 •' 111 1 'id 1 Om- 

men ial. 

1 1 n't kid new- bulletin to h- 
11 i<l lie--. New - 1- too vital .1 part ol 
dio programing to risk 1 onfusing the 
audieni >■ 

I I » - * 1 1 1 insult sponsoi •■< 

audience. 

\ iolatin these prin< iples in an ef- 
fort to In- funnj can not mil. • 
"tune-out 1 of listeners but ma) keep 
youi ct.'s oil tin- ait due t- 1 stations 
policies. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > > r i- 1 on< eded I" he the I 
difficult of ail f..r m-. It 1 in fall d'.u 11 

easiest through over-writing ■■' over- 
acting. It is in th ih.it the 
1 adio commercial can fall on it- I 
1 Please turn in | 



Minimum 
CROSS-SECTION OF COMMERCIALS FROM LIGHT TOUCH SCHOOL 



PRODUCT 



ACENCY 



WRITER 



DESCRIPTION 



Beechnut coffee Kenyon & Eckhardt Donald Stem 



Penelope, girl taxiilcrmi-t. alrim-i In- * ^. the 
world adventurer, over coffee m — - * .1 f • op< m parody 



Cavaliers 



W.n. Est\ 



Joe Saeeo \ "mysterj character" named Roger 1- "ni.nl" a 1 tout a 

Marge Throne 1 ' rtain brand 1 igarette as othen r r\ to Egnre hii angle 



Chesterfield Kings McCann-Erickson 



Don Calhoun \ playful series featuring the < besterfield i 

Dave Lippincott hi- berald, and a sympathetic lion by name of B 



Contadina 



I!r i-aeher. W heeler 
& Stall 



Man T rebei a 
I |n\\ a I'd ( lossase 



**\\lni pul eight great tomatoes in the itty-bittj 

has been getting asked fur quite awhile, -till amuses 



Ford 



I. W alter Thompson 



\A ( lardriei 
Joe Stone 



Vrchie phones I>ull\ from rln- I teO him he 

I ulit a Ford in a monologue shot with malapropisms 



Hoffman's beverages Gi 



N "i 1 i- Konheim Innouncei tells bow all Hoffman Bevei iges bare thai 

Montr Ghertlei "h*PP) taste" except aarsapariHa (not a hap] 



Life Savers 



1 ouns i. Rubicam 



Preston Wood t ; ■ \ 1 \ ;i 1 of the old, amusing bit of nonsenar 

Bill W hitman explaining whj I ife Savers have a huh- in the middle 



Manischewitz Wines Emil Mogul 



M\ron Mahler 



Taped from a tv commercial, tin- .urn 



Martinson's coffee \l Paul Leftoi 



Dwighl I tsk 



Tininiv. the Timiil Typist, -• k" prob- 

lem by bringing in her own thermos of Martini 



Pall Mall 



S! CB 



TilTarn Tha\ er 



Parodii The Ra\cn" anil 

"'Village Blacksmith" declaimed in murk-drama? 



Pepperidge Bread Ogiky. Benson 

\ Mather 



Bill Wright 

Man ka\ Hartigan 



A complete ingredients storj is gotten air..-- through 
Parker Fennelly's brilliant role as Farmer Titu- 



Piel's Beer 



^ oune \ Hiihic 



Ed Graham 1 



Corned • - B R 1- Bert & H.irry Pie] 

owners, bring warmth and wit to job of selling 



Rambler 



Geyer 



l!a\ Mauei 
Jim Del ne 



t-hearted rah-- told by Arnol 
such Rambler sales point- as compactness, economy 



Schick Razor 



P>en ton \ Bom le 



copi group 



t-of-histOTJ theme playlet? find Paul Re- 

vere or Lady G 



Schweppes Tonic 



( tgih \ . Benson 

S Mather 



lu\ a T int 



While Cmdr. Whitehead, client prexy, explain- Schwep- 
di e, .1 Kentuckian keeps calling him "< olonel" 



Sen -Sen Ted Bates 

*Free lance 

illllllllllllH' '!l!llllllllllllllllllllllllll'!l!!illllli ' II llll Ill 



Sheldon I oomer 
1 idea b\ Tom Cad 1 



Confuciu--talk take-off wherein Chinese philosopher, 
Cho I S Sen, tells pirl facts on breath and love 



WE LIVE IN A 
TOWN OF 12,754 




Small town stuff, you say? Home town stuff, we say! Yes, Hometown and Rural 
America families like this represent one of the most valuable sections of economic 
America! They, together with millions and millions of their counterparts make up the 
vast audience that Keystone Broadcasting System covers like a blanket. 

Simple multiplication of this hometown brings into focus the importance of these 
Keystone markets to your advertising and your product. No longer can this facet of 
the great national marketplace be ignored— it represents too much profit potential! 

Like this family, Hometown and Rural America buys the products they hear about 
through the 939 Keystone stations ... an audience of 90 million listeners! 




Send for our new station list 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

111 W. Washington 



Sta 2-8900 



527 Madison Ave. 
Eldorado 5-3720 



LOS ANGELES 
3142 Wilshire Blvd. 
DUnkirk 3-2910 



SAN FRANCISCO 
57 Post St. 
SUtter 1-7440 



• TAKE YOUR CHOICE. A handful of stations or the network ... a minute or a full hour-it's 
up to you. your needs. 

• MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR. No premium cost for individualized programming. Network 
coverage for less than some "spot" costs. 

• ONE ORDER DOES THE JOB. All bookkeeping and details are done by Keystone, yet the best 
time and place are chosen for you. 



ID 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



TV BASICS/MAY 



^% change in name from "Comparagraph t" "\\ Basics 
features sponsor's seventh monthl) compendium "I network 
.mil >|ii>i Facts and figures. Henceforth, the name Compara 
graph will !><• associated with the network i\ program schedule 
which appears as pari 3 of T\ Basics. This monthl) report 
continues the breakdown <>1 sponsored web t\ shows 1>\ major 
industries, advertisers and brands starting again with the in- 
dustry categories which appeared in the 1<> March issue. The 

second li-t will be completed in the <'! June \\ Basics. \ ng 

the features <>f the current T\ Basics is a complete lisl of ad- 
vertisers who spent more than $50,000 on l.D.'s during L956. 
I'he lisi covers 155 advertisers and the brands using l.D.'s. 



ram profile i>rm idt 
sponsored hours data , . JC c below 

■ i network it 

has thou intuit-. . . . pogc 42 

Comparagraph gives day-by-daj 
chart "i nil net shows . . page 48 



^k llphabetical index of nil shows 

tin hull-, in-/ data page 50 



C *</'<>/ ii basics cover the 1956 

spenders on I.I). i . . . page 54 



1. NETWORK PROGRAM PROFILE 

AVERAGE COST OF PROGRAMING BY TYPES 



Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Hour drama 
$59,833 12 


Half-lmur drama 
$33,382 17 


Situation corned] 

$36,534 15 


now ly-variet] 
$65,555 9 


Half-hour comedy-var. 
$39,607 7 


Half-hour adventure 
$30,155 16 


Quiz 
$25,835 12 


ials 

$10,429- 7 



•Per week of five quarter-hour shows; other programs are once-weekly and are all nighttime sha 



NUMBER OF SPONSORED HOURS: LIVE AND FILM' 



Daytime 



Nighttime 



Network 


Sponsored 
hours 


% live 


°o film 


ABC 


11.00 


4.5 


95.5 


CBS 


36.00 


88.2 


11.8 


NBC 


19.62 


87.3 12.7 



Sponsored 
Network hours °o live °o film 


ABC 


23 00 


46 7 


54.3 


CBS 


26.50 


54.7 


45.3 


NBC 21.92 65.8 34.2 



Tor week of 5-11 May 



SPONSOR • LI MAI l ( )i. 



41 



2. HOW COMPETING CLIENTS COMPARE 



Second series of major industry 
categories, advertisers, brands and 



ratings on web tv start below 



Designed to aid advertisers in making quick comparisons 
between their show ratings and those of competitors, this 
regular Tv Basics feature runs in two sections. The list 
below starts off the second series of this data, ft will be 
concluded in the 8 June Tv Basics after which the list of 
advertisers, with new brand and rating data, will begin 
over again. These lists cover major industry categories in 
network tv only. The list below covers appliances, auto 
accessories, cars and trucks, confections and soft drinks, 
cosmetics and toiletries, dental and drug products. The 
next list will cover such groups as food, soap and tobacco. 
Data is based on material supplied by Broadcast Adver- 
tisers Reports, monitored off-the-air by tape recordings, plus 
Pulse multi-market ratings. Footnotes give further data. 



Industries covered here include autos, cosmetics, drugs 



Appliances 

American Motors 
Disneyland; ABC; W-N; Kelvinator 
appliances 

General Electric 

Broken Arrow; ABC; Tu-N; major 
appliances 

Conflict; ABC; Tu-N; small appli- 
ances 

G.E. Theatre; CBS; Su-N; major & 
small appliances 

Hoover Co. 

Garry Moore; CBS; Tu-D; vacuum 
cleaners — 

Radio Corp. of America 

Producers' Showcase; NBC; M-N; 
major & Whirlpool appliances 

Singer Sewing Machine Co. 
Playhouse 90; CBS; Th-N; sewing 
machines 

Sylvania Electric Products 
Buccaneers; CBS; Sa-N; small appli- 
ances, tubes 



Westinghouse 

Studio One; CBS; 
small appliances 



M-N; major & 



26.0 

19.4 
18.3 
32.7 

9.7 

18.7 

32.9 

15.6 

24.6 



Auto Accessories 

American Oil 

Person to Person; CBS; F-N; Amoco* 
tires 27.0 

General Motors 

Wide Wide World; NBC; Su-D; A C 
automotive equipment, Delco bat- 
teries, Hyatt ball bearings, S;i: 
naw power steering 15.6 

B. F. Goodrich 

Burns & Allen; CBS; M-N; tires 29.5 

Gulf Oil 

Life of Riley; 



NBC; F-N; tires 21.7 



Cars and Trucks 



Rambler 



American Motors 
Disneyland; ABC; W-N; 
autos 

Chrysler 

Ray Anthony; ABC; F-N; Plymouth 

autos „ 

Climax; CBS; Th-N; Chrysler Corp, 

DeSoto & Plymouth autos 

Lawrence Welk; ABC; Sa-N; Dodge 

autos 

Welk Top Tunes, New Talent; ABC; 

M-N; Dodge & Plymouth autos 

You Bet Your Life; NBC; Th-N; 

DeSoto autos 



26.0 



6.8 



30.9 



25.1 



14.1 



29.9 



Ford Motor 



Ford Theatre; ABC; W-N; Ford autos 12.7 
I Love Lucy; CBS; M-N; Ford autos 38.3 
Ed Sullivan; CBS; Su-N; Mercury 

autos 37.1 

Tennessee Ernie; NBC; Th-N; Ford 

autos 



Zane Grey; CBS; F-N; Ford autos.. 



6.2 
21.7 



General Motors 

Crossroads; ABC; F-N; Chevrolet 

autos & trucks 14.9 

Garry Moore; CBS; W-D; Chevrolet 

autos 9.7 

Dinah Shore; NBC; Th-N; Chevrolet 

autos 10.1 

Wide Wide World; NBC; Su-D; all 

GM autos 15.6 



Confections and Soft Drinks 

American Chicle 

Jim Bowie; ABC; F-N; Clorets, Den- 
tyne 17.3 

Ozark Jubilee; ABC; Sa-N; Beemans 
pepsin gum, Clorets 7.1 

Ccca Cola Co. 
Mickey Mouse Club; ABC; M-D; soft 
drink 20.8 



Lud 



en s 



Inc. 



Captain Kangaroo; CBS; Sa-D; Fifth 
Avenue candy bar 10.3 



Nestle Co. 

Lone Ranger; CBS; Sa-D; chocolate.. 15.5 

Sweets Co. of America 

Cowboy Theatre; NBC; Sa-D; Tootsie 

Roll candies 6.2 

Heckle & Jeckle; CBS; Su-D; Tootsie 

Roll candies 10.2 

Howdy Doody; NBC; Sa-D; Tootsie 

Roll candies 7.8 

Modern Romances; NBC; Tu-D; 

Tootsie Roll candies 10.3 

Texas Rangers; CBS; Sa-D; Tootsie 

Roll candies 12.4 

Tic Tac Dough; NBC; Tu-D; Tootsie 

Roll candies 5.7 



Cosmetics and Toiletries 

Alberto-Culver Co. of Hollywood 

It Could Be You; NBC; Tu-D; VO-5 
hair preparations 5.8 

Modern Romances; NBC; Tu-D; VO-5 
hair preparations . 10.3 

American Home Products 

D. Edwards; CBS; M.W-N; Aero- 
shave, Heather rouge, Jocur wave 
set 

Love of Life; CBS; Tu-D; Neet 

depilatory 

Secret Storm; CBS; 

pilatory 



M-D; Neet de- 



12.0 



9.3 
7.2 



Armour and Co. 

George Gobel; NBC; Sa-N; Dial 
shampoo 22.6 

Danny Thomas; ABC; Th-N; Dial 



ABC; 
shampoo & soap 



12.6 



Bristol-Mvers 

Arthur Oodfrev: CBS; M.W-D; Ban ... 10.8 
Alfred Hitchcock; CBS; Su-N; Mum 31.4 
NBA Basketball; NBC; Sa-D: Vitalis 8.6 
Playhouse 90; CBS; Th-X; Ban, Tru- 
shay. Vitalis 32.9 

Carter Products 

Horse Racing; NBC; Sa-D; Arrid, 

Kisc 8.0 



Data above and on page 44 are based on Broadcast Advertisers Reports for the week ending 

8 March. More detailed data, such as length and placement of commercials, can be found 

R reports themselves, Not Included here are buys in participation shows, such as 

Today lutings are based on a Pulse 22-market weighted average material for the 



week ending 7 March. All ratings are averages f"r the week. e.g.. ratings for segmented shows 
do not necessarilj show the audience fo) the actual segment sponsored by the client. All time 
purchased by advertisers follows name of network: "X" means night, "D" means day. days of 
week are abbreviated. For exact time of show, see Comparagraph itself. 



15 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




Pulse rings doorbells 



intervieics families 




in their homes 



2. HOW COMPETING CLIENTS COMPARE continued 



Nat King Cole; NBC; M-N; Arrid, 

Rise - 9.6 

NBA Basketball; XBC; Sa-D; Rise 8.6 

< Ihesebrongh-Pond'e 

Conflic i ; ABC; Tu-N; Angel Face 
powder, Angel Skin lotion, cold & 
dry ^ k 1 1 1 cream 18.3 

Jim Bowie; ABC; P-N; Vaseline hair 

lC 17.3 

Colgate-Palmolive 

Big Payoff; CBS; M,YV,Th,F-D; Lus- 
tre- Creme, Lustre Net. Palmolive 
soap 9.3 

Bob Cummings; CBS; Th-X; Halo, 
Palmolive soap 24.4 

Millionaire; CBS; W-N; Palmolive 
shave products 26.9 

Mi Adams & Eve; CBS; F-N; Lus- 
tre Creme, Lustre Nel 22.8 

Strike It Rich; CBS; M-F-D; Cash- 
mere Bouquet soap, Lustre Creme 
shampoo, Palmolive soap 8.9 

Gillette Co. 

Cavalcade of Sports; NBC; F-N; 

Foamy shave, razors & blades 17.1 

Hazel Bishop 

Beat the Clock; CBS; F-N; hair 

spray, lipstick 13.4 

You,-,. On Your Own; CBS; Sa-N; 
dry skin cream, hair spray, lip- 
stick 11.2 

Helene Curtis Industries 

Oh Susanna; CBS; Sa-N; spray net._ 19.7 

Andrew Jergens Co. 

Steve Allen; NBC; Su-N; lotion, 
Woodbury soap 24.1 

Lanolin Plus Inc. 

Hold That Note; NBC; Tu-N; Lano- 
lin Plus products 9.1 

Lever Bros. 

Lux Theatre; NBC; Th-N; Lux" soap 18.9 

Mennen Co. 

Boxing; ABC; W-N; pre-shave lotion, 
shave creams, skin bracer, spray 
deodorant 14.5 

Queen for a Day; NBC; W-D; Skin 

Magic 12.4 

Procter and Gamble 

Edge of Night; CBS; M,Th-D; Camay- 
soap 7.7 

Guiding Light; CBS; M-F-D; Ivory 
soap 10.2 

I Love Liny; CBS; M-N; Lilt home 
permanent 38.3 

Tins Is Your Life; NBC; W-N; Prell 23.8 
Wyman; NBC; Tu-N; Ivory soap 24.8 

I. or. ii. i Young; XBC; Su-N; Camay 
soap 22.8 

Purex Corp. 

Big Surprise; NBC; Tu-N; Sweet- 
heart soap 14.1 

Revlon Products 

f 64, 000 Challenge; CBS; Su-N; lip- 

'■iticlc 27 *? 

$64,00ii Question; CBS; Tu-N; Love 
Pat powder, Satin Set, Silicare lo- 
tion 32.1 

20th century Pox; CBS; W-N; Aqua- 
marine lotion. Frosted nail enamel, 
Futurama Lipstick case,- lipstick, 
Love Pat powder, Silken Net... 20.6 

Sales Builders 

NBC; Tu-N; Max Factor pan- 
cake ... 18.4 

Schick Inc. 

et; NBC; Th-N; electric shav- 

24.4 



Sperry Rand 

What's Mj Line; CBS; Su-X; Rem- 
ingti n electric shavers 27.8 

Sterling Drug 

The Vise; ABC; F-X; Molle shave 
cream 9.6 

Toni Co. 

Blondie; NBC; F-N; Deep Magic 19.0 

People Are Funny; NBC; Sa-N; Tip 
Toni & Tonette home permanents.. 19.8 

Queen for a Day; NBC; M-D; Tonette 

& Toni home permanents 12.4 

Talent Scouts; CBS; M-N; Deep 

Magic, Tame 30.5 

Tic Tac Dough; NBC; M-D; Deep 
Magic, Silver Curl, Tonette & Toni 
home permanents 5.7 

Y. n Bel Your Life; NBC; Th-N; 
Deep Magic, Prom home perma- 
nent. White Rain _ 29.9 

Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. 

Hit Parade; NBC; Sa-N; Hudnut 
Quick home permanent 24.2 

Wildroot Co. 

Robin Hood; CBS; M-N; cream oil, 

formula #2 32.6 



Dental Products 

American Home Products 

Love of Life; CBS; M-D; Kolynos 

toothpaste 9.3 

Secret Storm; CBS; W-D; Kolynos 
toothpaste 7.2 

Bristol-Myers 

Arthur Godfrey; CBS; M.W-D; Ipana 
toothpaste 10.8 

Alfred Hitchcock; CBS; Su-N; Ipana 
toothpaste 31.4 

Mickey Mouse Club; ABC; W,Th,F-D; 
Ipana toothpaste 20.8 

Colgate-Palmolive 

Big Payoff; CBS; W.F-D; Colgate 
dental cream 9.3 

Mighty Mouse; CBS; Sa-D; Colgate 
dental cream 15.1 

Strike It Rich; CBS; Tu,Th-D; Col- 
gate dental cream 8.9 

Lever Bros. 

The Brothers; CBS; Tu-N; Pepsodent 

toothpaste & brushes 20.0 

Lux Theatre; NBC; Th-N; Pepsodent 
toothpaste & brushes 18.9 

Procter and Gamble 

Brighter Day; CBS; M.W.Th, F-D; 

Gleem 7.3 

Wyatt Earp; ABC; Tu-N; Gleem 25.8 

Queen for a Day; NBC; Tu,Th-D; 

Gleem 12.4 

Search for Tomorrow; CBS; M-F-D; 

Gleem 10.0 

This Is Your Life; NBC; W-N; Crest 23.8 
Loretta Young: NBC; Su-N; Gleem... 22.8 

Sterling Drug 

Modern Romances; NBC; W-D; Dr. 

Lyons tooth powder 10.3 



Drug Products 

American Home Products 

I). Edwards; CBS; M,W, Th-N; Ana- 
cin, BiSOdol, Heet, Infra Rub... 12.0 

Love of Life; CBS; M-F-D; Anacin, 

Bisodol, Heet. Infra Rub, Outgro ... 9.3 

Name That Tune; CBS; Tu-N; Ana- 
cin _ 19.1 

Secret Storm; CBS; M-F-D; Anacin, 
Bisodol, Heet, Infra Rub 7.2 

Bauer and Black 

('apt. Kangaroo; CBS; Sa-D; Curads 

Mat tie Ribbon bandages 10.3 



Bristol-Myers 

Arthur Godfrey; CBS; M.W-D; Buf- 
ferin .. 10.8 

Alfred Hitchcock; CBS; Sn-N; Buf- 

ferin, Minit-Rub 31.4 

Playhouse 90; CBS; Th-N; Bufferin ... 32.9 

Johnson and Johnson 

Heckle & Jeckle; CBS; Su-D; Band- 
Aids 10.2 

Garry Moore; CBS; F-D; baby prod- 
ucts, surgical dressings 9.7 

Our Miss Brooks; CBS; F-D; baby 
products, Band-Aids, surgical dress- 
ings 8.7 

Robin Hood; CBS; M-N; baby prod- 
ucts 32.6 

Lanolin Plus Inc. 

Hold That Note; NBC; Tu-X; All-In- 
One reducing tablets _.. 9.1 

Lewis-Howe Co. 

Jonathan Winters; XBC; Tu-X; Turns 7.3 

Luden's Inc. 

Capt. Kangaroo; CBS; Sa-D; cough 
drops 10.3 



Mennen Co. 

Robert Montgomery; 
Baby Magic 



XBC; M-N; 



20.1 



Mentholatum Co. 

Bob Crosby; CBS; M-D; chest rubs.- 9.2 
Tic Tac Dough; XBC; Tu,F-D; chest 
rubs 5.7 

Miles Laboratories 

Broken Arrow; ABC; Tu-X; Alka 

Seltzer, One-A-Day vitamins 19.4 

Mickey Mouse Club; ABC; M-D; Bac- 

tine, One-A-Dav vitamins 20.8 

Xews; XBC; W.F-X; Alka Seltzer, 

One-A-Day vitamins _ 11.3 

Queen for a Day; XBC: Th-D; Alka 

Seltzer, One-A-Day vitamins. ... 12.4 

Tennessee Ernie; XBC; Th-D; Alka 

Seltzer, One-A-Day vitamins 6.2 

Norwich Pharmacal 

Arthur Godfrey; CBS; Tu-D; Pepto 

Bismol 10.8 

Noxzema Chemical Co. 

Perry Como; XBC; Sa-N; skin cream 28.6 

Pharmaceutical 

Amateur Hour; ABC; Su-N; Geritol, 
Xiron, RDX tablets, Serutan, Somi- 
nex, Zarumin 6.4 

Xews; CBS; Su-X; Geritol, Sominex, 
Zarumin 12.0 

To Tell The Truth; CBS; Tu-X; Geri- 
tol, Sominex, Zarumin 17.8 

Pharmaco 

Comedy Time; XBC; F-D; Medigum, 

Regutol 6.7 

It Could Be You; XBC; F-D; Medi- 
gum, Regutol 5.8 



Rexall Drug Co. 

Steve Allen; XBC; Su-X; 
Rybutol 



Intracel, 



24.1 



Sterling Drug 

Modern Romances; XBC: W.F-D; 
Bayer aspirin. Ironized yeast; Phil- 
lips milk if magnesia 10.3 

The Vise; ABC; F-X; Bayer aspirin, 
Fletchers Castoria, Phillips milk 
of magnesia 9.6 



Vick Chemical Co. 
Jonathan Winters; XBC; Tu-X; cold 
remedies _ 



7.3 



44 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




ANOTHER major award for the nation's 
outstanding NEWS station KSTP-TV ! 



In 1956. KSTP-TV entered four national TV news corn- 
pet it ions. The results are now in: four first-place awards! 

The Radio-Television News Directors Association 
gave KSTP-TV two top awards, "Best TV News Story 
of 1956" and "Nation's Outstanding News Operation." 
Then the National Press Photographers Association pre- 
sented the blue ribbon to KSTP-TV in the National 
Newsreel Contest. 



And. now. the coveted Sigma Delta Chi award 
Distinguished Service in Television Report been 

won for KSTP-TV by Julian Hoshal and Di< 
News and Photo Director, respectively, for KSTP-TV 

We're only kidding with the cartoon above Actually 

we're proud of all these awards and the news • 

which won them. It is one of the reasons whj the North- 
west's first TV station is still the Northwest 

TV station. 



CHANNEL 
3,000 WATT! 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL Basic NBC Affiliate 

Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



45 



BUFFALO'S OWN AGENCIES 
AND ADVERTISERS CHOOSE 
WBUF, CHANNEL 17, AS THE 

MOVING 
FORCE IN 
BUFFALO 



To sell "Milk for Health" throughout the 
8-county Niagara frontier area, Baldwin, 
Bowers & Strachan, Inc., buys the "11th 
hour news," with Frank Frederics and Jan 
Okun, on wbuf. 

" 11 th hour news ," with its nightly news- 
casts (M-F, 11 pm), appeals to a head-of- 
the-family audience (91% adult) that "Milk 
For Health" wants to reach. 

FRANK FREDERICS AND JAN OKUN are a 

smooth-working, selling combination. 
Jan's persuasive commercial delivery and 
Frank's compelling news style achieve con- 
tinuing results for the 4,000 dairy farmers 
who sponsor them. 

"wbuf," in the words of Baldwin, Bowers 
& Strachan Vice President Everett L. 
(Tommy) Thompson, "has more than lived 
up to the promise of its impressive facilities, 
management and staff with its outstanding 
programming, promotional support, and 
community acceptance. 'Milk For Health' 
invested in the future when it bought the 
'HTH hour news' on wbuf. That invest- 
ment is paying off already with a 52% audi- 
ence increase within the first six months!" 

An ever-growing list of satisfied advertisers 
makes wbuf the fastest-moving force in 
Buffalo. Put that force to work for you today! 

Exciting things are happening on 




*J 



Left to right: H. Truman Rice, TV Producer, Baldwin, 
Bowers & Strachan, Inc.; Jan Okun; Frank Frederics: 
Martin Magner, Program Director for WBUF. 



46 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



47 




DAYTIME 



C O 




P A 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



Look Up & Live 
•ust 



Lamp Unto My 
Feet 
■ust 



UN In 
Action 

BUSt 



Camera Three 
■ust 



Let's Take Trip 
sust 



Wild Bill Hickok 
Kellogg 



Heckle & leckle 
Sweets Co 

(last 5/26) 
alt sust 



Frontiers of 
Faith 
No net service »"" 

Catholic Hour 

(.via id, 2tii 



No net service No net service 



No net service 



Watch Mr. 
Wizard 

sust 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



Carry Moore 
i !atnpbeU Soup 

Lever Bros 
alt 

Bird & Son 



Arthur Codfrey 
Stand Brands 
Stand Brands 



Home 
partlc 
10-11 



Home 



Bristol-Myers 
Bristol-Myers 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Valiant Lady 
Stand Brands 



Love of Life 
Amer Home Prod 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Cuiding Light 
E&O 



Price Is Right 
sust 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Tic Tac Dough 

P&G alt 

Church & Dwight 

Tori alt P&G 



It Could Be You 
sust 



Amer Home Prod 
alt P&G 



News 
(1-1:10) sust 



Stand Up & Be 
Counted 

sust 



As the World 
Turns 
P&G 



Our Miss Brooks 

sust 



Art Linkletter 
Stand Brands 



Campbell Soup 



Close-Up 
co-op 



Club 60 
co-op 



Club 60 



Tenn Ernie 

sust 

Brown & Wmson 

alt sust 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Carry Moore 
Hooter 



Arthur Codfrey 
Mutual of Omaha 



Home 
panic 



Home 



Kellogg 
Pillsbury 



Price Is Right 
suit 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Valiant Lady 
Wesson Oil 

Love of Life 
Uuer Home Prod 



Tic Tac Doueh 
3weeU i last 5/21) 
Stand Brands 
5 tart) 



P&G 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



It Could Be You 
sust 



Cuiding Light 
E&U 



Alberto CulTer 
alt P&G 



News 
(1-1:10) sust 

Stand Up & Be 
Counted 

sust 



Close-Up 
eo-op 



As the World 

Turns 

P&G 



Club 60 
co-op 



Our Miss Brooks 

Best Foods 

alt sust 



Art Linkletter 
Kellogg 

Pillsbury 



Club 60 



Tenn Ernie 
Stand Brands 



Stand Brands 



J- 



No net service 



Youth Wants 
To Know 

sust alt 
Amer Forum 

sust 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 
(3-4:30) 

partlc 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Matinee 

(3-4) 
partic 



Afternoon Film 

Festival 

(3-4:30) 

partic 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Matinee 
(3-4) 
partlc 



Afternoo 
Fest 
i3-t 
part 



lohns Hopkins 

File 7 

sust 



The Last Word 
■ual 

(last 5/26) 



Zoo Parade 
sust 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Bob Crosby 

sust 

Gerber alt 

sust 



Matinee 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Bob Crosbv 
Wesson Oil 



Matinee 



Afternooi 
Festi 



College News 
Conference 



lace The Nation 

5:30. 5/19) Wide Wide World 
(alt wks 4-5:30) 



1cdic.il Horizons 
Ciba 



Dean Pike 

BUSt 



This Is Defense 

WestinEhouse 
14-5 5/19 only) 



World News 

Round Up 

sust 

(5:30-6. 5/19) 



Gen Motors 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Project 20 

( 4-5, 5/19) 
Coif Champ 

Gillette 
i 1 -i ::il, 6/2) 



No net service 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



See It Now 

Pan Am 

(5-6. 6/2 only) 



Topper 
i alt «k< 5-5:301 



Odyssey 

sust 

(5-6) 

(not seen 5/19) 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 
co-op 



Outlook 

sust 



Cora Cola 

Miles all 
Minn Mining 



jueen for a Day 
\mcr Home Prod 



Toni alt Brown 
& Williamson 



Afternoon Film 
Festival 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



odern Romances 
Sterling Drug 



No net service 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



Queen for a Day 
Stand Brands 

Borden 
(5/14 start) 
3 id Brands 



Affcnoo 

Festi 



Modern Romances 

Culrer alt 

Sweets Co 



No net 



Cornedv Time 
Wesson Oil 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 
co-op 



B F. Goodrich 



Comedy Time 
sust 



Mickey 
Clu 
co-o 



Mattel 
GmT 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NEW NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH AND INDEX 



The network schedule on this and following page? (50, 51) 
includes regularly scheduled programing on the air between 
11 May and 7 June I with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime). Irregularly sched- 
uled programs to appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are as follows: Tonight, NBC, 11:30-12:30 



X G R A P H 



11 MAY- 7 JUNE 



DNESDAY 

Iff NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 




1 Moore 
» Brat 


Home 
panic 




Carry Moore 

v.'l- »:: mil 

Tool alt Swift 


Home 
panic 


C M 

Garry Moore 

I'ltti Plata Olid 
alt mat 


Home 
partle 




Capt Kangaroo 


Howdy Doody 

r • 
- ■ Od 


1 Godfrey 

• W lilt tail 


Home 




Arthur Codfrcy 

Cm r ..!> Home 
Scott Paper 




■onnion A Jonnun 
all Cal Packing 

\. .. - 


Home 




Mighty Mouse 

• 

Cb!| 


Cumby 


i Mjer» 


Price li Right 

•Ult 




K.llott Prir „ u Rjftht 

Plllibury tun 




Y.r.lley alt 
PltU Plate Olaaa 


Price Is Right 

• Ult 


Suunt Show 


Fur» 


Staler all SOS 


It Rich 
Cite 


Truth or 
Consequences 

IU<t 




Strike It Rich Truth or 
Colgate Consequences 


Strike It Rich 
Collate 


Truth or 
Consequences 

■ Ult 


Tens Rangers 

It s A Hit 


Capt Gallant 




IUlt 






Lover 






It Lady Tic Tac Dough 


Valiant Lady 

Tonl alt Tic Tac Dough 




Valiant Lady 
Gen Mllli 


Tic Tac Dough 

IUlt 


Big Top True Story 




►if Life 
vie Prod 








Lovf of Lift 
Amer Home Prod 




1'ai; 


Love of Life 'Mlnneaou Mining 
alt PAG 


PAO 








ih for |t Could Be You 
lirrow lrmour tit lust 


Search for 
Tomorrow 


It Could Be You 

IUlt 




Search for It Could Be You 
Tomorrow imar Home Prod 
''.•-• alt luit 




Detective Diarv 




.0 


Brown A Wroion 
all Com Prod 






Welch alt 
Brlllo 


Big Top 




! Light 

•a 




Guiding Light 
p*n 


Cuiding Light Brlllo alt Com 
p*n 




) iUlt 

p & Be Close-Up 
•ted co '°P 
it 




News 
(1-1:10) iust 


Closc-Up 
co-op 




News 
(1-1:10) luit 


Closc-Up 
co-op 


Lone Rao. 




Stand Up & Be 
Counted 

IUlt 




Stand Up & Be 

Counted 

lust 




No net service 




World 

ns Club 60 

co-op 




As the World Club 60 
Turns co-op 
PAG 


As the World ... . ,. 
Turns Club 60 
PAG '"-"P 


No net service 
Dizzy Dean 

IUlt 




ii Brooks 

• t 

iiit tuit 


Club 60 




Our Miss Brooks 




Our Miss Brooks 
sust 


Club 60 


Baseball Came No net service 

of the Week Lc0 Dur0 .- 

Warmup 
»rr Brewing 












Nettle alt suit 




alt iust 




Ikletter 


Tenn Ernie 

lUSt 




Art Linklctter 
Kellogg 


Tenn Ernie 
ITJIt 




Art Linkletter 

Lever Bros Tenn Ernie 

sust 

Swift 


„ . „ Maior League 
Baseball Baseball 

(CM 

<afetv Raior n 
' -Til 




nil 


Dlilc Cup alt 

Brown A Wmsnn 


Plllsburr 


Mile. 




ayoff 

He 


Matinee 
(3-1) 
panic 


Afternoon Film B| p ff M ,V'" ee 

(3-1:30) partle 
partle 


Afternoon Film 

Festival Big Payoff 
(3-4:30) Colgate 
partle 


Matinee 
(3-4) 
panic 


Baseball 


■ op 




rosby 
ier 


Matinee 


Afternoon Film 
Festival 


Bob Crosbv 
Tonl alt Swift 


Matinee 


Afternoon Film 
Festival 


Bob Crosby 
SOS alt Swift 


Matinee 


Baseball 






Mill 


PAG 




Gen M 








r Day 




Duron for a Day 

Pi tie Cup alt 

Sandura 

Borden alt 


Afternoon Film 


Brighter Day 
PAG 


Queen for a Day 
Sunkist alt 


Afternoon Film 


Brighter Day 
PAG 


Queen for a Day 

Borden 

Amer Home Prod 

alt Com Prod 




Baseball 






Storm 
ne Prod 


Festival 


Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 


Minnesota Mlntnf 
Miles 


Festival 


Secret Storm 
Amer Home PTod 




Night 


PAD 


No net service | Edge of Night 

r,\r. 


PAG 


Edge of Night 


PAG 




No net service 




Mod m Romanc I 




rfrHern Romances 
Corn P 
Sterling Drug 


Modern Romances 
Kraft 


No net service P*G 

Com Prod 








Comedy Time 
Lever 


Mickey Mouse 

;iub eo-op 

Pillsbury alt 

Am Par 




Comedy Time 
Kraft 


Mickey Mouse 
Club 
co-op 




Comedy Time 
sust 




Dmc Handicap 






IUlt 


ootr) 






sust 


weicn an tun 


co-op 








Bristol-Myers 
Oen Fowls 


I ... 


Oen Mills 
Gen Mllli 






Star 
Comedy 

Corp 


Prcakncss 
■•mlTt 







p.m., Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday 
News Special. CBS. Sunday. 11-11:15 p.m.. sponsored bv 
Pharmaceuticals Inc.: Today, NBC, 7:00-9:00 a.m.. Mon- 
dav-Fridav. participating: The Jimmy Dean Show, ' BS, 
7:DO-7:45 a.m.. Monday-Friday, participating: Captain 
Kangaroo. CBS. 8:00-8:45 a.m.. Monday-Friday, 9:30- 



10:00 a.m.. Saturday, participating; Veuw, < BS, ~ I 
a.m. and 8:45-9:00 a.m., Monday-Friday. 

Ml times art- Eastern Daylight Participating spons 
are not listed because in many cases they fluctuate. 

Sponsor-, co-sponsors and alternat- are 

shown along with the names of programs. Agencies, brand-. 
costs and ratings appear in separate listings on pages 12, 50. 



3. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 



I 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



flicka 
(last 



Cou Asked for It 
BklpPT Peanut 

Butter 



Hollywood 

Film Theatre 

partlc 

(7:30-9) 



Hollywood 
Film Theatre 



The Last Word 

Bust 
(6/2 start) 



SUBt 

Meet The Press 

Johns Manvllle 
alt 
suit 



You Are There 
(5/12 start) 
Prudential 



Roy Rogers 
Gen Foods 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 



Marge & Cower 

Champion 

alt 

Jack Benny 

Amer Tobacco 



77th Bengal 
Lancers 

Gen Foods 



Kukla, Fran 

& Ollie 

3ordon Hkng-co-op 



Circus Boy 

Reynolds Alum 



Ed Sullivan 

Lincoln-Mercury 

(8-9) 



Steve Allen 

Bulova, Drarkctt, 

Greyhound, 

Polaroid. 
V. S. Time 



Hollywood 
Film Theatre 



Ed Sullivan 



Steve Allen 
(8-9) 



iv flaynouse 

Goodyear alt 

Alcoa 

(9-10. 3 wks in 4) 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



D Edwards 
Brown & Wmson 



John Daly News 
Genl Cigar 



No net service 

D Edwards 
Brown & Wmson 



Wire Service 
R. J. Reynolds 



Robin Hood 

Johnson & Jhsn 

alt Wlldroot 



Wire Service 

Miller Brewing 

alt sust 



Burns & Allen 

Carnation alt 
Goodrich 



Nat King Cole 

sust 



News 

American Can 

alt 6ust 



Voice of 
Firestone 

Firestone 



Talent Scouts 

Lipton 
alt Toni 



Sir Lancelot 

A mer Home alt 

Lever Bros 

(3 wks in 4) 



Wells Fargo-G Fda 
alt Am Tob (3 in 4) 
Prod Showcase (1 In 
1, 8-9:30) Hancock 
RCA-Whirlpool 



ABC 



TUESDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



Kukla, Fran 
& Ollie 

Jordon Bkng-co-op 



John Daly News 
Genl Cigar 



Cheyenne 

Gen Electric 
(alt wks 
7:30-8:30) 



D Edwards 
Whitehall 



No net service 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 



>)ame That Tune 

Whitehall alt 

Kellogg 



Conflict 

Cliesebrough- 

Ponds 

(alt wks 

7:30-8:30) 



Phil Silvers 

P&G 

alt 

R. J. Reynolds 



Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills 

alt P&G 



Private 

Secretary 

Lever alt Sheaffer 



Kukla, 
& O: 

Gordon Br 



onathan Winters 
Lewi s -Howe 



News 

sust 



Arthur Murray 

Party 

Purex ait 

Speldel 



Panic 
UfcM alt Max F. 



Wash Square 

Curtis. Royal 

(8-9. 6/4 only) 



I 

AB 



John Dal 
Geol I 



Disney 
Amer J 
Amer ] 
Derby j 

(7:30-f 



Disney 



Navy 
Amer TV 
U.S. Ri 



Amateur Hour 
Pharmaceuticals 
(9-10) 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 



Press Conference 

Corn Prod 



I Love Lucy 
P&G alt 

Gen Foods 



Twenty-One 

Pharmaceuticals 
(3 wks In 4) 



Broken Arrow 

Gen Electric 

alt Miles 



To Tell The 

Truth 

Pharmaceuticals 



Jane Wyman 
P&G 



Ozzie & 
Rods 



Amateur Hour 



Hitchcock 
Theatre 

Bristol- Myers 



Chevy Hour 

Chevrolet 
(9-10. 1 wk In 4) 



Welk Top Tunes 
New Talent 

D'Klge-Plyroouth 
(9:30-10:30) 



Mike Wallace 
Philip Morris 



$64,000 
Challenge 

Revlon alt 
P. Lorlllard 



What's My Line 

Sperry-Rand 
alt H Curtl6 



Loretta Young 
P&G 



Welk Top Tunes 



No net service 



Dec Bride 
Gen Foods 



Robt Montgomery 

"I. C. Johnson 

alt Mennen 

(9:30-10:30) 



Studio One 

Westinehouse 
(10-11) 



Studio One 



Cavalcade 
Theatre 

DuPont 



Red Skelton 
Pet Milk alt 
S. C. Johnson 



Circle Theatre 

Armstrong 

(alt wks 

9:30-10:30) 



Ford Th 
Fort 



Wash Square 

Royal McBee 

Helene Curtis 

(9:30-10:30, 

5/20 only) 



It's Polka Time 
co-op 



$64,000 

Question 

Revlon 



Spike |ones 
L&M 



Kaiser Alum Hr 
Kaiser Alum 

(alt wks 
9:30-10:30) 



Wed N 

Figh 

Pabst (last, 

Menr 



No net service 



Mile 
(6/5 it 
(10 



4. ALPHABETICAL PROGRAM INDEX 

Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 6-11 p.m. 



■ . i 
Ik 



PROGRAM 



Steve Allen Show: V-L 



Amateur Hour: V-L 
Red Barber's Corner: Sp-L 
Beat the Clock: Q-L 
Jack Benny: C-L&F 
Big Story: Dr-L&F 

Blondie: Sc-F 

Bold Journey: A-F 
Jim Bowie: A-F 

Broken Arrow: A-F 
Buccaneers: A-F 
Burns & Allen: Sc-F 
Caesar's Hour: V-L (last 5/25) 



Cavalcade of Sports: Sp-L 



COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


$ 63,000 


Bulova (5/19, 6/2 only), Mc-E; 
Drackett, Y&R; Creyhound, Crey; 
Polaroid, D. D. Bernbach; U. S. 
Time, Peck 


23,000 


Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 


3,000 


State Farm Ins, NLB 


18,000 


Hazel Bishop, Spector 


65,000 


Amer Tobacco, BBDO 


33,000 


Amer Tobacco, SSCB; Ralston Purina, 
Cardner 


37,500 


Nestle, B. Houston; Toni, Tatham- 
Laird, C. E. Frank 


8,000 


Ralston Purina, CBB 


32,000 


Amer Chicle, Bates; Chesebrough- 
Ponds, Mc-E 


31,000 


Cen Elect, Y&R; Miles, Wade 


24,000 


Sylvania, JWT 


33,000 


Carnation, Wasey; Coodrich, BBDO 


114,000 


Babbit, DFS; Benrus, L&N, Knomark, 




Mogul: Quaker Oats, NLB; Wesson 




Oil, Fitzgerald 


35,000 


Cillctte, Maxon 



PROGRAM 



Marge & Gower Champion 

V-L&F 
Cheyenne: A-F 
Circle Theatre: Dr-L 
Circus Boy: A-F 

Climax: Dr-L 

* Perry Como: V-L 

Conflict: Dr-F 

Joseph Cotten Show: Dr-F 

Crossroads: Dr-F 
Bob Cummings Show: Sc-F 
John Daly News: N-L 
Date With the Angels: Sc-F 
December Bride: Sc-F 
Disneyland: M-F 

Dragnet: My-F 
DuPont Theatre: Dr-F 



41,000 

90,000 
40,000 
34,000 

55,000 
108,000 

90,000 
38,000 

31,000 
36,000 

6,000tt 
38,000 
28,000 
75,000 

37,000 
37,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIE 



fcn 

Amer Tobacco, BBDO 

I- 
Cen Elect, Y&R, BBDO & Crey fe.t( 
Armstrong Cork, BBDO 

Reynolds Alum, Clinton E. Frai 

Buchanan 
Chrysler, Mc-E 

Cold Seal, North; Kleenex, FC,, 
Noxzema, SSCB; RCA, K&E; S( 
Stamps, SSCB; Sunbeam, Perrin-Pa 

Chesebrough-Ponds, JWT & Mc-E 

Campbell Soup, BBDO; Lever Bros, 
BBDO 

Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 

Colgate, Brown; R. J. Reynolds, E: 

Du Pont, BBDO; Ceneral Cigar, y; 

Plymouth, Crant 

Cen Foods, B&B 

Amer. Motors. BFSD & Ceyer; Arm 
Dairy, Camp-Mithun: Derby, Mel 

L&M, Mc-E; Schick, W&L 

DuPont, BBDO 






•Color show, (L) Live, (P) Film, ftCost is per segment. List does not include 
sustaining, participating or co-op programs — see chart. Costs refer to average show 
including talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency com- 
mission). They do not include commercials or time charges. This list covers period 



of 11 May thru 7 June. ProgTam types are 
(C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr) Dram 
Misc., (Mu) Music, (My) Mystery. (X) News 
Comedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety. 



indicated as follows: (A) Adventa u 

a, (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (■ 

(Q) Quiz, (S) Serial, (Sc) Situit 



k G R A P H 



11 MAY- 7 JUNE 



NESDAV 

CS NBC 



ircls 



service 
irds 

vv b ■ a 



Step 

I Mil 

■ i 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



D Edwards 
Whitehall 



Xavicr Cugat 
nut 
(lut 



News 
Time alt Mlln 



odfrey 
>l»er> 



cy 

•It 

iry 



Masquerade 

Party 

ftnodttwl Product 

lit Park A Ttlford 

A Knomark 

Father Knows 
Best 

Scott Taper 



Kukla. Fran 
& Ollie 
p.knK eo op 



No net service 



|ohn Daly News 

llu IVuiL 



Lone Ringer 

Celt Mllli alt 

Bwlft 



D Edwards 
Whiti-hall 



Sgt. Preston 
Quaker Oatl 



Dinah Shore 
CTievrolM 



News 
Spemr Rand 



Circus Time 
partlc 



Bob Cummings 

Colgate alt 
it J Reynold! 



You Bet Yr Life 

DeSoto alt 

Tonl 



Circus Time 



Climax 

Chrysler 

(8:30-9:30. 



Dragnet 
I.AM ait Behlek 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS NBC 



D Edwards 

111 n I 



Kukla. Fran No net service 

. b °" ie ' D Edwards 

■onion Bknteo-op „, ., , 

|ohn Daly News ill n B 
1>i I'ont 



Rin Tin Tin 
Nabisco 



Beat the Clock 

II llllhop 



Xavicr Cugat 

(la.t 



News 

AUlaa. 



Jim Bowie 

Amer Ctilele all 

Chetebrough- 

Pond» 



West Point 
Gen Foodj 



Blondie 

Tonl alt 

NeilU 



Crossroads 
Chevrolet 



Zane Crey 
Gen Fooda 
alt Ford 



Life of Riley 
Gult Oil 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



This Is 
Calen Drake 

■ 



Famous Film 
Fcitiv.il 
partln 



Buccaneers 



People Are 

Funny 
• It 
It J I. 



Billy Cr.ih.im 
B Graham 
Evanfi 



Billy Graham 

(conn 

(8-9. 6/1 itart) 



lackie Cleason 



lackie Cleason 
luit 



Perry Como 

HAH «!iBM 
Noxz#aa 

rSunbtam 

> 
■Id SmJ 



• 



Kraft Theatre 
Kraft (9-10) 



Danny Thomas 

Armour alt 
Kimberly-Clark 



Climax 



People's Choice 
Borden alt P&o 



Treasure Hunt Mr. Adams & Eve J« ( CoMon Show 
M.«-n D.r.d r™"^, U-£ "ro. 

(3 »ki In 4) 



Lawrence Welk 

D dn 

(9-10) 



Cale Storm 
- alt 
- Curt la 



Secret 
nslda 



Kraft Theatre 



Bold journey 
Ralston- Purina 



Playhouse 90 

Amer Gas 

alt 

Bristol Myers 



Ford Show 
Ford 



The Vise 
Sterling DTUg 



Schlitr 
Playhouse 

S eh 1117. 



-I Hr 
|] 

111 



Fox Hr 

0-11) 



Big Story 
Ralston Purina alt 
Amer Ton (3 In 4) 

Chevy Show 
(9-10. 1 In a) — 



Lawrence Welk 



S R O Playhouse 

■tartl 
'~h.ll alt 
-til 



Caesar i Hr 

Batu-ua. Ha&bltt 

Knoaari 

Color Carnival 

>t< I Whirlpool 

Olds lltlt 

1 >k lo 4) 



This Is 

Your Life 

PAG 



Telephone Time 
Bell 



No net service 



Playhouse 90 
Philip Myers 

alt 
Bristol Myen 



Lux Theatre 

I^erer Broa 

(10-11) 



Date With 

The Angels 

Plymouth 



Playhouse 90 
sust 



Lux Theatre 



Line-Up 
PAG alt Brown 

A Williamson 



Person to Person 

\ >>ll & Hamm 

alt Time. Inc 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 

Gillette 
iin-enncl) 



Ozark Jubilee 
Am Chicle 
alt 
William ion Dickie 



Cunsmoke 

IJM alt 

Sparry- Rand 



Ceo Cobel 
AraMar all Pat 
13 oka to 4) 



Red Barber 
St Farm Ins 



Ozark lubilee 

Mrs. America 

inals 

1 »..':" 11 ". 



Two For The 
Money 

suit 



H,f Parade 
• It Huclnut 



PROGRAM 



•'yalt Earp: A-F 

oug Edwards News: N-L&F 

ther Knows Best: Sc-F 

rd Show: V-L 
ord Theatre: Dr-F 
.E. Theatre: Dr-F 
iant Step: Q-L (last 5/29) 
ickie Gleason: Y-L 
ndfrey's Scouts: V-L 
\rthur Godfrey Time: V-L 

eorge Gobel: C-L 
unsmoke: A-F 

itchcock Presents: My-F 
obin Hood: A-F 

Love Lucy: Sc-F 
ve Got a Secret: Q-L 
bike Jones: Mu-L 
aiser Alum. Hour: Dr-L 
Kraft Tv Theatre: Dr-L 
ukla, Fran & Ollie: J-L 
issie: A-L 
ife of Riley: Sc-F 
ine-Up: My-F 
ine Ranger: A-F 
.ux Video Theatre: Dr-L 
Masquerade Party: Q-L 



30.000 
9.500tt 

38.000 
33.000 
36.000 
45.000 
23.000 
102.500 
28.000 
38.000U 

45.000 
38.000 

34.000 
28.000 

52.000 
24.000 
35.000 
58.000 
34.000 

34.000 
32,000 
31.000 
24.000 
43.000 
22.000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 

Ccn Mills, DFS: P&C. Compton 

Whitehall. Bates; Brown & Wmson, 
Bates; Hazel Bishop. Spector 

Scott Paper, JWT 

Ford, JWT 

Ford, JWT 

Cen Elect, BBDO 

Ccn Mills. BBDO 

P. Lorillard. L&N 

Lipton. Y&R; Toni. North 

Amer. Home Prod, Y&R; Bristol- 
Myers. Y&R; Kellogg. Burnett; Pills- 
bury. Burnett 

Armour. FCB: Pet Milk. Gardener 

L&M DFS; Sperry Rand (1 wk in 4), 
Y&R 

Bristol-Myers. Y&R 

Johnson & Johnson. Y&R: Wildroot, 
BBDO 

Ccn Foods. Y&R: P&C, Crcy 

R. J. Reynolds. Esty 

L&M. DFS 

Kaiser Alum, Y&R 

Kraft. JWT 

Cordon Bkng. Ayer: & co-op 

Campbell Soup. 8BD0 

Culf Oil, Y&R 

Brown & Wm'son, Bates; P&C. Y&R 

Cen Mills. DFS: Swift. Mc-E 

Lever Bros, JWT 

Associated Products. Crey: Knomark 
i5 29 start). E. Mogul; Park & Til- 
ford 'last 5 15'. E. Mogul 



PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Mi it the Press: I-L 


7.500 


Johns Manvillc. |WT. alt wks open 


Millionaire: Dr-F 


32.000 


Colgate. Bates 


* Robert Montgomery: Dr-L 


52.000 


S. C Johnson, NLB: Menncn Co. Crey 


Mr. Adams & Eve: Sc-F 


41.000 


Colgate. L&N; R. J. Reynolds. Esty 


♦Arthur Mun.i. Part} \ 1 


• • 


Purcx. E. H. Weiss Spcidel. NC&K 


Name lhat Tune: Q-L 


23.000 


Kellogg. Burnett. Whitehall. Bates 


Navy Log: Dr-F 


32.000 


Amer Tobacco. SSCB; US Rubber. 
F D Richards 


NBC News: N-L 


9.500tt 


American Can. Compton; Miles. Wade; 
Spcrry-Rand. Y&R; Time-Life Y&R: 
1 scg & 1 alt scg open 


Ozark Jubilee: V-L 


18.000 


Amer Chicle. Bates: Williamson- 
Dickic. Evans 'alt wks 10-10:30); 
co-op 10:30-11 


Ozzie & Harriet: Sc-F 


36.000 


Eastman Kodak. JWT 


Panic: Dr-F 


36.000 


L&M. Mc-E: Max Factor. DDB 


People Are Funny: M-F 


24.000 


R. |. Reynolds. Esty; Toni. North 


People's Choii S ! 


34.000 


Borden. Y&R. P&C. Y&R 


1' • son to Person : I-L 


34.000 


Amer Oil. 1 Kati Hamm. Camp- 
Mithun: Time-Life. Y&R 


Playhouse 90: Dr-L&F 


117.000 


Amer Cas. L&N; Bristol-Myers BBDO: 
Philip Morris. Burnett 


Press I inference : 11 


8.500 


Corn Prod. C L Miller 


Prh ite S 


36.000 


Lever, OB&M: Shcaffer. Seeds 


Rin Tin Tin : \ ■!•' 


32.000 


Nabisco. Ko-E 


Roj R _ ■- \-F 


32.000 


Ccn Foods. B&B 


tz Playhonse: Dr-F 


36.000 


Schhtz. JWT 


77th Bengal Lancer-: A-F 


41.000 


Ccn Foods. Y&R 


Phil - 


41.000 


P&C. Burnett: R | Reynolds. Esty 


•Sir 1 - elol : \-K 


24.000 


Amer Home Prod. Bates: Lever Bros. 

SSCB 
Quaker Oats. WBT 


Sgt. Preston: A-F 


32.000 



•Talent and production costs are carried by A Murray 



Listing continues on page 52 



Index continued... Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 6-11 p.m. 



PROGRAM 



COST 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



* Dinah Shore: Mu-L 
$64,000 Challenge: Q-L 
$61,000 Question: Q-L 
•Red Skelton: C-L&F 
- R.O. Playhouse: Dr-F 

(5 II Mart) 
Gale Storm Show: Sc-F 

Studio One: Dr-L 
Ed Sullivan Show: V-L 
Sunday News Special: N-L 
Telephone Time: Dr-F 
This Is Galen Drake: V-L 
This Is Your Life: D-L 
Dannv Thomas: Sc-F 
To Tell The Truth: Q-L 
Treasure Hunt: Q-L 
•TV Playhouse: Dr-L 

20th Century Fox: Dr-F 
Twenty-One: Q-L 
U.S. Steel Hour: Dr-L 



22,000 
32,000 
32,000 
48,000 
11.500 

39,500 

55,000 
69,000 
9,500 
31,000 
15,000 
52,000 
36,000 
22,000 
21,000 
52,000 

110,000 
30,000 
58,000 



Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 
P. Lorillard, Y&R; Revlon, BBDO 
Revlon, BBDO 

S. C. Johnson FCB; Pet Milk, Cardner 
Whitehall (5/11 start), Bates: Helene 
Curtis (5 18 start), Ludgin 

Nestle, B. Houston; Helene Curtis, 
Weiss & Celler 

Westinghouse, Mc-E 

Lincoln-Mercury, K&E 

Pharmaceuticals, Klcttcr 

Bell. Ayer 

Best Foods, Guild, Bascom & Bonfigli 

P&C, B&B 

Armour, FCB; Kimberly-Clark, FCB 

Pharmaceuticals, Kletter 

Mogen David, Weiss & Celler 

Alcoa, Fuller, Smith & Ross; Good- 
year, Y&R 

Revlon, C. J. LaRoche 

Pharmaceuticals, Klcttcr 

U.S. Steel, BBDO 



PROGRAM 


COST 


The Vise: Dr-F 
Voice of Firestone: Mu-L 
Mike Wallace: I-L 
Wednesday Fights: Sp-L 


19,500 
24,000 
15,000 
45,000 


Lawrence Welk: Mu-L 
Welk Top Tunes: V-L 
Wells Fargo: A-F 
West Point: Dr-F 
What's My Line: Q-L 


14,500 
16.500 
38,500 
40,000 
28,000 


Jonathan Winters: C-L 
Wire Service: Dr-F 


12,500 
77,000 


Jane Wyman Show: Dr-F 
You Are There: Dr-F 


27,000 
37,000 


(5/12 start) 
You Asked For It: M-F 
You Bet Your Life: Q-F 
Loretta Young Show: Dr-F 
Your Hit Parade: Mu-L 


14,000 
51,750 
40,000 
46,000 


Zane Grey Theatre: Dr-F 


45,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Sterling Drug, DFS 

Firestone, Sweeney & James 

Philip Morris, Ayer 

Mennen, Mc-E; Pabst (last 5 29), 

Burnett; Miles (6,5 start), Wade 
Dodge, Grant 

Dodge & Plymouth, Grant 
Amer Tob, SSCB; Gen Foods, Y&R 
Gen Foods, B&B 
Helene Curtis, Ludgin; Sperry-Rand, 

Y&R 
Lewis-Howe, DFS 
Miller Brewing, Mathiesson; R. J. 

Reynolds, Esty; % sust 
P&C, Compton 
Prudential, Reach, McClinton 

Skippy Peanut Butter, GBB 
DeSoto, BBDO; Toni, North 
P&G, B&B & Compton 
Amer Tobacco, BBDO; Warner Hud- 
nut, SSC&B 
Ford, JWT; Cen Foods, B&B 



Sponsored Daytime Network Programs 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 



PROGRAM 




COST 


As the World Turns: 


S-L 


$ 3,400tt 


Baseball Game of Week: 

Si, I 




Big Payoff: Q-L 




6,000tt 


Brighter Day: S-L 




10,000 wk 


Capt. Gallant: A-F 




31,000 


Comedy Time: Sc-F 




rerun 



Bob Crosby: V-L 



Detective Diary: A-F 


8.000 


Edge of Night: S-L 


17,000 wk 


Five Star Comedy: J-L&F 


6,000 


(S 18 start) 




Fury: A-F 


33,000 


Arthur Godfrey: V-L 


4,150tt 



Guiding Light: S-L 
Gumby: J-L 
•Heckle & Jeckle: J-F 
Howdy Doody: Ju-L 

It Could Be You: Q-L 



Art Linkletter: V-L 

Love of Life: S-L 
Lone Ranger: A-F 
Major League Baseball: 
Sp-L 

Medical Horizons: D-L 
Mickey Mouse Club: J-F 



Mighty Mouse: J-F 
Modern Romances: S-L 



3,150ft 



10,000 wk 
3,500tt 
6,000 

24,000 

3,000tt 



4,000tt 

10,000 wk 
18,000 



22,000 
5,040 to 
6,300tt 



20,000 
2,700ft 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



P&C, B&B 

Falstaff Brewing, DFS; Amer Safety 
Razor, Mc-E; Philip Morris, Burnett 
Colgate, Houston 
P&C, Y&R 
Heinz, Maxon 

Kraft, JWT; Lever, BBDO; Welch, R. 

K. Manhoff; Wesson, Fitzgerald; 5 

segs & 1 alt seg open 
Best Foods, DFS, Ludgin; Gen Mills, 

Knox-Reeves; Gerber, D'Arcy; P&G, 

Wesson, Fitzgerald; SOS, Mc-E; 

Swift, Mc-E, JWT; Toni, North; 

P&G, B&B; 1 seg & 1 alt seg open 
Sterling Drug, DFS, Vi spon 
P&C, B&B 
)oe Lowe Corp, Paris & Peart 



Cen Foods, B&B; Borden, Y&R 

Bristol-Myers, Y&R; Gen Foods, Y&R; 
Kellogg, Burnett; Mutual of Omaha, 
Bozell & Jacobs; Norwich, B&B; 
Pillsbury, Burnett; Scott Paper, 
JWT; Sherwin Williams, F&S&R; 
Simoniz, Y&R; Stand Brands, Bates 

P&G, Compton 

Sweets Co., Eisen 

Sweets Co. (last 5/26), Eisen 

Cont Baking, Bates; Sweets Co, Eisen; 

Vi open alt wks 
Amer Home Prod, Bates, Ceyer; Ar- 
mour, T. Laird; Brillo, JWT; Brown 
& Wm'son, Seeds; Corn Prod, C. L. 
Miller; Alberto Culver, Wade; 
P&C, DFS; Welch, Rich K. Manoff; 
3 segs & 2 alt segs open 
Campbell Soup, Burnett; Kellogg, 
Burnett; Lever Bros, BBDO; Pills- 
bury, Burnett; Simoniz, Y&R; Stand 
Brands, JWT; Swift, Mc-E 
Amer Home Prod, Bates 
Gen Mills, DFS; Nestle, Mc-E 
R. J. Reynolds, Esty, 14 $P°n 



Ciba, JWT 

Amer-Paramount, Buchanan; Armour, 
Tat-Laird; Bristol-Myers, DCSS; 
Coca Cola, Mc-E; Gen Foods, 
FC&B; Cen Mills, Knox Reeves; 
Coodrich, Mc-E; Mattel, Carson 
Roberts; Miles, Wade; Minn Min- 
ing, BBDO: Pillsbury, Burnett; SOS, 
Mc-E; 8 segs co-op 

Cen Foods, B&B; Colgate, Bates 

Alberto Culver, Wade; Corn Prod, C. 
L. Miller; Kraft, JWT; Sterling, 
DFS: Sweets Co, Eisen 



PROGRAM 



COST 



Garry Moore: V-L 



3,600tt 



Our Miss Brooks: Sc-F 



Price Is Right: Q-L 
Queen for a Day: M-L 



Search for Tomorrow: S-L 
Secret Storm: S-L 
Strike It Rich: M-L 
Texas Rangers: A-F 

(last 5/25) 
Tenn Ernie Ford: V-L 



Tic Tac Dough: Q-L 



True Story: Dr-L 

Truth or Consequences: Q-L 

Valiant Lady: S-L 

Wild Bill Hickok: A-F 



3,170tt 
3,000tt 



10,000 wk 
9,500 wk 
15,000 wk 
18,000 

3,500ft 



2,500tt 



18.000 

3,450tf 
10,000 wk 

27,000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



Best Foods, DFS, Ludgin; Bird & Son, 
H. Alley & Richards; California 
Packing, Mc-E; Campbell, Bur- 
nett; Gen Motors 'last 5/22), 
Campbell-Ewald; Hoover, Burnett; 
Johnson & Johnson, Y&R; Lever 
Bros, JWT; Nestle, Mc-E; Pitts- 
burgh Plate Class, Maxon; SOS. 
Mc-E; Staley, R&R; Swift, JWT, 
Mc-E; Toni, North; Yardley, Ayer; 
2 alt segs open 

Best Foods, DFS; Gerber, D'Arcy; 
Johnson & Johnson, Y&R; Nestle, 
Mc-E; 5 segs open & 5 alt segs 
open 

Lever Bros. BBDO; 9 segs open 

Amer Home Prod, Bates, Ceyer; Bor- 
den, Y&R; Brown & Wm'son, Seeds; 
Corn Prod, C. L. Miller; Dixie Cup, 
Hicks & Greist; Mennen, Mc-E: 
Miles, Wade; Minn Mining, BBDO, 
P&G, Compton; Sandura, Hicks & 
Creist: Stand Brands. Bates; Sun- 
kist. FCB; Toni, North 

P&C, Burnett 

Amer Home Prod, Bates 

Colgate, Bates 

Cen Mills, Tat-Laird; Sweets Co, Eisen 

Brown & Wm'son, Seeds; Dixie Cup, 

Hicks & Creist; Miles, Wade; 

Stand Brands, Bates; 4 segs & 1 alt 

seg open 
Church & Dwight, JWT; Kraft, JWT; 

Minn Mining, BBDO; P&G, DFS; 

Stand Brands (5 28 start), Bates; 

Sweets Co (last 5 '21), Eisen; Toni. 

North; 2 segs open 
Sterling Drug, DFS, Vz sp°n 
Lever Bros, BBDO; 8 segs open 
Cen Mills, DFS; Nestle, Mc-E; Stand 

Brands, JWT; Toni, Tatham-Laird; 

Wesson. Fitzgerald 
Kellogg, Burnett 



Specials and Spectaculars 
for 11 May-7 June 



* Chevy Show: V-L 
Billy Graham: ML 

Palm Beach Golf 
Championship: Sp-L 
Preakni-": Sp-L 
•■Producers' Showcase: 

Dr-Mu-L 
*Sat Color Carnival: Dr-Mu-T. 

See Ii Now: D-F 
This Is Defense: D-L 
•Washington Square: V-L 

Wide Wide World: M-L 



$145,000 



once only 

once only 
320,000 

250.000 

125.000 
once only 
125.000 

195.000 



Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald — 5 17, 6 2 
B. Craham Evangelistic Asso. Walter 

F. Bennett — 6 1 
Gillette. Maxon — 6 2 

Cillette, Maxon— 5 18 
RCA-Whirlpool, K&E; John Hancock 
(last 5 27), Mc-E— 5 27 



Mc-E- 
K&E; 



Oldsmobile, 



RCA-Whirlpool, 

Brother— 5 11 
Pan Am, JWT— 6 2 
Westinghouse, F&S&R— 5 19 
Helene Curtis, Ludgin: Royal McBee, 

Y&R— 5 20. 6 4 
Cen Motors. Brother & Camp-Ewald 




1 oil J #/#//#/ i*ii<h A Perfect II of*### Series Hum** 

II 1 T NIELSEN PROVES 



Station 



NIELSEN NCS NO. 2 
NOVEMBER, 1956 



WKZO-TV 

STATION B 



No. of 

TV Homes 

In Area 



DAYTIME 



Weekly 
NCS 
Circ. 



633,120 421,820 
512,980 310,720 



Daily 
NCS 
Circ. 



292,720 



NIGHTTIME 

Weekly Daily 

NCS NCS 



Circ. 



Cir 



464,530 378,080 



203,170 348,140 278.660 



YOU NEED WKZO-TV 

TO STRIKE THEM OUT IN 

KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS! 

November, 1956 Nielsen figures left show thai WKZO- 
TV is the top buy in one <>f America's top-20 television 
markets. In fact, WKZO-TV delivers more riewersnight- 
ii ne DAILY than the second station delivers MONTH- 
LY, day or night '. 

WKZO-TV is the Official Basic CBS Television Outlet 
for Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids and Greater Wesl 
Michigan. It serves over 600,000 television families in 
29 Western Michigan and Northern Indiana count 







WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000 TOWER 



Kalamazoo - Grand Rapids and Greater Western Michigan 
Avery- Knodel. Inc.. Exclusive National Representatives 

'Don l.arsni nf the Yankee* ilitl it <<;i October ft. 1956, 



5. SPOT TELEVISION BASICS 



The 155 companies listed here include all clients who spent 
$50,000 or more in term- of j^ross time for I.D.'s during 
1956. Data is supplied by TvB from material put together 
by N. C. Rorabaugh Co. Total spending on I.D.'s last year 



came to nearly $47 million or nearK 12' , of the $398 mil- 
lion spent in spot tv during 1956. All brands shown used 
I.D.'s but the $50,000 cut-off refers to total spending by 
the company. Material is from TvB's first annual report. 



HERE ARE 155 FIRMS WHO SPENT $50,000 OR MORE ON I.D.'S IN 1956 



American Tobacco Co. 
Hit Parade Cigarettes 
Lucky Strike 
Cigarettes 
Pall Mall Cigarettes 

Anderson, Clayton fc Co. 
Meadolake Margarine 
Mrs. Tucker's 

Margarine 
Mrs. Tucker's 

Shortening 

Associated Products, 
Inc. 

5 Day Deodorant Pads 

Avoset Co. 

Avoset Dairy Cream 
Qwip Whipped Cream 

B 

B. T. Babbitt Co., Inc. 

BAB-0 Cleanser 
Cameo Cleanser 
Glim Detergent 

Baird's, Mrs., Bakery 
Baird Bread 

Best Foods, Inc. 
Gold Plate Foods 
Hellmann's Mayonnaise 
Nucoa Margarine 
Rit 

Blatz Brewing Co. 
Blatz Beer 
Triangle Beer 

Blumenthal Bros. Choc. 
Co. 
Candy 

Borden Co. 
Borden's Inst. Coffee 
Dairy Products 
Ice Cream 

Brown & Haley 

Candy Bars 

Brown & Williamson 
Tobacco Co. 
Kool 
Raleigh 
Viceroy 

Burgermeister Brewing 
Corp. 

Burgermeister Beer 



Burrus Mills, Inc. 
Lightcrust Cake Mix 
Lightcrust Flour 
Lightcrust Shortening 



Burry Biscuit Corp. 
12 Treat Ice Cream 
Cookies 



Carting Brewing Co., 
Inc. 

Carling's Black Label 

Beer 
Carling's Red Cap Ale 
Stag Beer 
Carter Products, Inc. 
Arrid Deodorant 
Nair 
Rise Shaving Cream 

Carvel Co. 

Ice Cream 

Chrysler Corp. 

All Chrysler Corp., 

Cars 
Chrysler Cars 
Plymouth Cars 

Chunky Chocolate Corp. 
Chunkies Candy 

Coast Federal Sav & 
Loan Assoc. 

Coca-Cola Co. /Bottlers 

Buck Beverage 
Coca-Cola 

Colgate-Palmolive Co. 

Ajax Cleanser 
Brisk Dentifrice 
Colgate Bar Soap 
Colgate Dental 

Cream 
Colgate Lustre Net 
Halo Shampoo 
Merry Detergent 
Palmolive Shave 

Cream 

Colonial Baking Co. 

Bread 

Colonial Stores, Inc. 

Food Stores 

Columbia Baking Co. 
Champ Bread 
Hollywood Bread 
Southern Bread 
Southern Cake 



Commercial Solvents 
Corp. 

Norway Anti-Freeze 
Peak Anti-Freeze 

Continental Baking Co. 
Hostess Cakes 
Morton Frozen Foods 
Profile Bread 
Staff Bread 



Continental Baking Co. 

Twinkies 
Wonder Bread 

Cream of Wheat Corp. 
Cream of Wheat 



Dairymen's League Co-Op 
Dairylea Dairy 

Products 
Dairylea Ice Cream 

Delta Air Lines, Inc. 

Democratic Party 

Donnelly, Reuben H., Co 
Yellow Pages 

Dormin, Inc. 
Pellex 

Drackett Co. 

Drano Cleanser 
Windex Cleanser 

Duffy Mott Co. 

Apple Products 

Duncan Coffee Co. 

Admiration Coffee Inst. 
Admiration Coffee Reg. 
Admiration Coffee 

Inst. /Reg. 
Maryland Club Coffee 

Inst. 
Maryland Club Coffee 

Inst./Reg. 
Maryland Club Coffee 

Reg. 

Du Pont, E. I., 
De Nemours 

Duco Paints 
DuPont Car Wax 
DuPont Safety Wax 
Institutional 
Rosebush Insecticide 
Zerex & Zerone 
Anti-Freeze 



East Ohio Gas Co. 
Appliances 



Fanny Farmer Candy 
Shops 

Fleetwood Coffee Co. 

Fleetwood Coffee- 
Instant 

Fleetwood Coffee 
Inst. Reg. 

Fleetwood Coffee- 
Regular 

Florida Citrus 
Commission 

Citrus Products 



Folger, J. A., I Co. 

Folgers Coffee Inst. 
Folgers Coffee 

Inst./Reg. 
Folgers Coffee Reg. 

Ford Motor Co. 
Ford Accessories 
Ford Cars 
Ford Trucks 
Lincoln Cars 
Mercury Cars 

Frito Co. 

Champion Foods 

Cheetos 

Chili 

Fritos 

Tatos 



G. H. P. Cigar 

El Producto Cigars 
La Palina Cigars 

Gallo Winery E. I J. 

Burganday Wine 
Gallo Wine 
Sherry Wine 

General Baking Co. 

Biscuits 
Bond Bread 
Grossinger's Rye Bread 

General Electric Co. 
G.E. Washing 

Machine 
Hotpoint TV Sets 
Telechron Clocks 

General Foods Corp. 

Birdseye Frozen 

Foods 
Birdseye Frozen 

Poultry 
Bliss Coffee 

Inst. Reg. 
Bliss Coffee Reg. 
Gaines Dog Food 
Good Seasons 

Salad Dress. 
Jello Gelatin 

Dessert 
Jello Puddings 
Kool Aid 
Maxwell House 

Coffee Inst. 
Maxwell House Coffee 

Inst./Reg. 
Maxwell House 

Coffee Reg. 
Post Toasties 
Post's Cereals 
Post's Sugar Crisp 
Sanka Coffee Inst. 
Swansdown Cake 

Flour 
Swansdown Cake 

Mix 
Yuban Coffee 

Inst. Reg. 



General Mills, Inc. 
Betty Crocker 

Cake Mix 
Betty Crocker 

Pancake Mix 
Betty Crocker 

Waffle Mix 
Cheerios 

Drifted Snow Flour 
Gold Medal Flour 
Sperry Pancake Mix 
Sperry Waffle Mix 
Sperry Wheathearts 
Surechamp Dog Food 

General Motors Corp. 
All G.M. Cars 
Buick Cars 
Chevrolet Cars 
Chevrolet Trucks 
Frigidaire 

Appliances 
Oldsmobile Cars 
Pontiac Cars 
Saginaw Power 

Steering 

Goetz, M. K., 
Brewing Co. 
Country Club Beer 
Goetz Beer 

Golden Mix, Inc. 
Pancake Mix 

Great A & P Tea Co. 
A & P Food Stores 

Grove Laboratories, 
Inc. 
Bromo-Quinine 
Cold Tablets 
Citroid 
4 Way Cold Tablets 



H 



Haberle Congress 
Brewing 
Ale 
Beer 

Hall. Robert Clothes 

Hammer Beverage 

Co. ■Bottlers 
Ginger Ale 
Soft Drinks 

Hand, Peter, 
Brewing Co. 

Holsum Baking'Bakeries 
Bread 
Crackers & Cookies 

Hood Chemical Co. 
EZ Bleach 
EZ Starch 
Hood Bleach 
Hood Starch 
33 Bleach 
Zero Cleanser 



Channel Z 



tuns tinjs around... 

*" At 

the Utod of 4fdk and Homui 




... and nearly a million people 
live within that "B" ring! 



YejrBigget'n Baltimore! 



I 




I.. MHO '(.I. ION 



SPONSOR • 11 M \Y 195*3 



55 



5. SPOT TV BASICS continued 



Hudson Pulp & Paper 
Corp. 

Paper Napkins 



Illinois Meat Co. 

Broadcast 
Canned Meats 
Imperial Sugar Co. 

Brown Sugar 

Cane Sugar 
International Salt Co. 

Sterling Salt 
Ireland's Chili Co. 

Barbecue Sauce 

Chili 

Pit Bar BQ 

Sauces 



J. F. G. Coffee Co 

JFG Coffee Inst. 
JFG Coffee Inst Reg 
JFG Coffee Reg 

Jenney Mfg. Co. 
Gas & Oil 

Jewell. J. 0., Inc. 
Jesse Jewell's 
Frozen Chicken 

Jewel Tea Co., Inc. 

Jewel Foods 

K 

Kellogg Company 
Special K Cereal 
Various Kellogg 
Cereals 

Koester's Bakery 

Bread 

Kroger Co. 
Food Stores 

Krueger, G., Brewing Co. 
Krueger Ale 
Krueger Beer 

Kuner-Empson Co. 

Canned Foods 



Lanvin Parfums, Inc. 
Lanvin Perfumes 

Leeming, Thomas, & Co., 
Inc. 
Ben-Gay 

Leslie Salt Co. 
Salt 

Lever Brothers Co. 
Dove Toilet Soap 
Imperial Margarine 
Surf Detergent 
Wisk 

Liggett & Myers 
Tobacco Co. 
Chesterfield 
L&M 

Lone Star Brewing Co. 
Lone Star Beer 

Lorillard, P., & Co. 

Kent Cigarettes 
i el Cigars 
Gold Cigarettes 

'.ager Brewing Co. 
ky Lager Beer 

Ludens, Inc. 
Cough Drops 
Fifth Ave. Candy Bars 



M 

M. J. B. Co. 

MJB Coffee Instant 
MJB Coffee Inst. Reg 
MJB Coffee Regular 
MJB Rice 
MJB Tea Reg. 
Tree Tea Reg. 

Marathon Corp. 
Northern Napkins 
Northern Tissues 
Northern Towels 
Paper Products 
Waxtex 

Martin Oil Co. 

Martin Oil 

Max Factor & Co. 
Max Factor 
Cosmetics 

Meads Baking Co. 
Dottie Lee Bread 
Meads Bread 

Michigan Auto Club 

Miles Laboratories, Inc. 
Alka-Seltzer 
Bactine 
One-A-Day Brand 

Vitamins 
Tabcin 

Miller Brewing Co. 
Miller High Life Beer 

Morris, Philip, & Co. 
Marlboro 
Parliament 
Philip Morris 
Spud 



N 



National Biscuit Co. 

Dromedary Foods 
Home Town Bread 
Millbrook Bread 
Nabisco Cookies & 

Crackers 
Nabisco Shredded 

Wheat 
NBC Bread 
Pal Dog Foods 

National Brewing Co. 

National Bohemian 

Beer 
National Premium Beer 

National Dairy Products 
Kraft Cheese 
Kraft Cottage 

Cheese 
Kraft Mayonnaise 
Kraft Orange Juice 
Kraft Parkay 

Margarine 
Kraft-Various 

Products 
Sealtest Dairy 

Products 
Sealtest Ice Cream 

Nehi Corp/Bottlers 

Nehi 

Par-T-Pak 

Royal Crown Cola 

Nestle Co., Inc. 

Decaf Instant Coffee 
Nescafe Instant 

Coffee 
Nestle's Chocolate 

Bars 
Nestle's Cookie Mix 
Nestle's Instant 

Coffee 



Ohio Provision Co. 
Meat Products 

Orkin Exterminating Co. 
Pest Control 

Ortlieb, Henry F., Co. 
Ortlieb Beer 



Pabst Brewing Co. 

Eastside Beer 
Pabst Beer 

Peoples Gas, Light & 
Coke Co. 

Utilities 

Pepper, Dr., Co. /Bottlers 

Nu Grape Soft Drinks 
Dr. Pepper Soft Drinks 

Pepsi Cola Co. /Bottlers 

Pepsi-Cola 

Petri Wine Co. 
Italian Swiss Colony 

Wine 
Petri Wine 

Pfeiffer Food Prod. Inc. 

Salad Dressing 

Plough, Inc. 

Mexsana Heat Powder 
Mexsana Skin Cream 
St. Joseph Aspirin 

Prescott, J. L., Co. 

Dazzle Bleach 
Dazzle Starch 

Procter & Gamble Co. 

Biz Liquid 

Detergent 
Big Top Peanut 

Butter 
Cheer 
Comet 
Crest 
Dash 
Duz 
Gleem 
Ivory Flakes 
Jif Peanut Butter 
Joy 

Lava Soap 
Lilt Home 

Permanent 
Oxydol 

Prell Shampoo 
Spic & Span 
Velvet Blend 

Shampoo 

R 

Radio Corp. of America 

RCA Appliances 
RCA Radio & TV Sets 

Reader's Digest Assoc. 

Reader's Digest 
Magazine 

Republican Party 

Revlon, Inc. 
Cosmetics 
Lipstick 

Nail Polish 
Satin-Set Pin Curl 

Spray 
Silicare Baby Lotion 
Silken Net Hair Spray 

Reynolds, R. J., Tobacco 
Co. 

Camel 



Reynolds, 
Cavalier 
Salem 
Winston 

Rheas Bakery 
Baked Goods 

Ritchie, Harold F., Inc. 

Brylcreem 

Eno Effervescent 

Roto-Rooter Corp. 

Plumbing Tool 



S. S. S. Co. 

Neurabalm 
S. S. S. Tonic 

Safeway Stores, Inc. 
Captains Choice Frozen 

Fish 
Cragmont Beverages 
Dairy Products 
Food Stores 
Guthrie Cookies 
Jane Arden Cookies 
Lucerne Milk 
Poultry 

Royal Satin Shortening 
Skylark Bread 

Salada Tea Co., Inc. 

Salada Tea 

Sardeau, Inc. 
Sardo Bath Oil 

Schaefer, F & M, 
Brew. Co. 

Schaefer Beer 

Schlitz, Jos. E., Brewing 
Co. 

Schlitz Beer 

Schonbrunn, S. A., & 
Co., Inc.. 

Savarin Coffee Reg. 

Scripto, Inc. 

Scripto Pencils 
Scripto Pens 

Sealy Mattress Co./Dlrs. 
Sealy Mattresses 

Seeman Brothers, Inc. 
Airwick 
White Rose Coffee 

Reg. 
White Rose Tea Reg. 

Serta Assoc, 
Inc. /Dealers 

Mattresses 

Seven-Up Co. /Bottlers 
Seven-Up 

Smith Brothers, Inc. 

Cough Drops 

Speedway Petroleum 
Corp. 
Speedway 79 Gas 

Standard Brewing Co. 
Erin Brew Beer 
Standard Ale 
Standard Beer 

State Line Potato Chip Co. 
Potato Chips 

Statler Tissue Corp. 
Statler Paper 
Statler Tissues 
Towels 

Sterling Drug, Inc. 
Dr Caldwell's 

Laxative 
Energine 



Sterling Drug, Inc. (continued) 

Fizrin 

MoNe Shaving Soap 

Phillips Milk 

of Magnesia 
Z B T Baby Powder 

Studebaker-Packard 
Corp. 

Packard Cars 
Studebaker Cars 

Superior Provision Co. 
Meats 

Sweets Co. of 
America, Inc. 
Tootsie Rolls 



Tea Council of U.S.A. 
Tea Promotion 

Terry Foods Co. 
Terry Frozen Foods 

Tetley Tea Co., Inc. 
Tetley Tea Regular 

Time, Inc. 
Life Magazine 

u 

U. S. Tobacco Co. 
Encore 

United Vintners, Inc. 

Italian Swiss Colony 

Wine 
Margo Wine 
Petri Wines 

V 

Vick Chemical Co. 

Inhalers 

Sof-Skin Hand Cream 
Vicks Cough Drops 
Vicks Cough Syrup 
Vicks Vaporub 
Vicks Vatronol 

w 

Ward Baking Co. 
Aunt Hannah Bread 
Tip Top Bread 
Tip Top Cakes 
Ward's Bread 

West End Brewing Co. 
Utica Club Ale 
Utica Club Beer 

Whitman, Stephen F., 
& Son 
Whitman's Candy 

Wilkins Rogers Milling Co. 
Washington Flour 

Williamson-Dickie Mfg. 
Co. 
Dickie Work Clothes 
Mens' Sport Clothing 

Wise Potato Chip Co. 
Potato Chips 

Wrigley, William Jr., Co. 

Doublemint Gum 
Spearmint Gum 



Zippy Products, Inc. 
Zippy Liquid Starch 






. 



.10 



- 



. 






- 






.re you have seen the i 



• 



bied that LC ■ - 

Lod PULSE hows that ' . 

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like . en guilty of mi - 

c , ' ze the ows i 

Lod. the 



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sor.e cons-" ' 



- 



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E- - 



. 









• 
• 
• 



» 







WTAL 


WCTV 


WPTV 


WKTG 


WTYS 


t270 KC 


CH. 6 


CH. 5 


N KC 


1340 KC 


TALLAHASSEE 


TALLAHASSEE • THOMABVILLE 




MASVILLE 




FLORIDA 


FLORIDA GEORGIA 


FLO' 


GEORGIA 


FLt 5 





SPONSOR ASKS 




What are the ingredients of an effective I.D.™ 



Gene Callivan, copy supervisor, Foote, 

Cone & Belding, Chicago 
An I.D. has one of the toughest rows 
to hoe in advertising. It is sandwiched 
in between shows. Usually, in between 
commercials. It has a restive, if not a 
retreating, audience to capture. \\ ith 
eight-seconds of video time, six-sec- 
onds of audio to do it. 1 10 video, 
eight-audio, if you share the screen 
with station call letter-. ' 

Yet, manv of the most memorable 



1 ^tnm^^^ 

n 



Mi* 



"remembei 

only one 
idea" 



commercials on tv today are I.D.'s. 
Right now, you can think of five in 
five seconds time. And remember their 
selling messages as well! 

What makes them stick? High fre- 
quency? Of course. But the main rea- 
son an effective I.D. registers its selling 
idea is, I think, that it asks you to re- 
member onlv one idea. 

In every effective I.D., too, there is 
a surprise. This may be a visual trick, 
a sound effect, an unusual voice, or a 
snatch of a tune. Something that gives 
it a personality different from the com- 
mercials surrounding it. Something to 
linger with the viewer — and add to the 
I.D.'s impact the next time he sees it. 
In good I.D.s this surprise element is 
not merely an added effect; it is an 
aspect of the one idea being promoted. 

In a recently completed I.D. for 
Kool-Aid, we singled out as our one 
idea, the Kool-Aid selling line "a ~>< s 
package makes 2 quarts." We said it 
in words, we said it with a super — and 
we said it with the illustration on the 
screen for the dominant part of the 
time — a frosted, two-quart pitcher 
filled with Kool-Aid. The surprise? 
The pitcher (already quite well known 
in tv circles for its ability to speak 



and sing) does a little rock and roll 
dance, accompanied voice over by 
children singing a new and catchy 
jingle which will have a wide airing 
on tv this summer. 



Judson H. Irish, senior vice president 
and copy chief, Ogiliy, Benson & Mather, 

New York 
Herb Gunter of Ted Bates has said, 
"Spot tv makes the toughest require- 
ments on the copy writer." He is dead 
right — and the shorter the tv spot, the 
tougher the assignment becomes. 

And the shortest of all is the I.D. 
Eight seconds of video. Six seconds of 
audio. The smallest, crudest assign- 
ment a writer can tackle. 

The problem is easier, however, if 
certain basic facts are kept in mind. 

1. Don't try to do too much. If 
you can get the product name across 
plus one sales point, you've done a hell 
of a good job. 

2. Make the video work hard — even 



"' Make the 
video work 
hard" 



harder than in a one-minute commer- 
cial. You must capture a viewer at 
the most difficult possible time — be- 
tween shows. You must hold the view- 
er through your eight seconds. You 
must penetrate with your product 
name plus one sales point. 

3. Don't talk too much. It is possi- 
ble to say 16 words in six seconds — 
but it is not advisable. Treat your au- 
dio as a picture caption. Presumably 
you have created a striking visual 
treatment of your selling story. Just 
explain it in your audio — in the fewest 
and best chosen possible words. Keep 
vour sentences short, simple, primer- 
like. Tie them in with vour video so 




tightly that audio and video become a 
single unit. 

4. Make every possible use of fa- 
miliar visual symbols of your product. 
Commander Whitehead works well in 
Schweppes I.D.'s. First he attracts at- 
tention. Second, his image transmits 
to the viewer's mind "Schweppes, 
Schweppes, Schweppes . . . Quality, 
Quality, Quality." Willie the Penguin 
says Kool. And so on. 

5. Don't expect too much. An I.D. 
is a rifle bullet — not a hydrogen bomb. 
You can hit only one idea, but right 
between the eyes. 

6. Don't be subtle. 

You can follow all these rules and 
fail miserably. Your I.D. will only be 
as good as the selling idea you have 
chosen to demonstrate. 



Frank Dennis, C. J. LaRoche, Inc., 

A eu ) ork 
There are no rules! When "rules" 
start to dictate the design and con- 
struction of a tv commercial, be it an 
I.D. or a full-length job, that's when 
mediocrity sets in. sameness sets in, 
and viewers apathy and disinterest 
start. 

Specifically, an I.D. is a challenge 
to ingenuity to make it different, com- 
pelling, attention-commanding, — in 
other words, make it effective. An I.D. 
has to register the product name and 
chief attribute in an indelible manner 
in an instant. These are not rules. Thev 




"good rules: 
enough time 
and money" 



are objectives. And they are not easv 
to achieve. In fact, creating an effective 
I.D. is probably the most difficult job 
for a creative department. And what 
makes it so difficult is the usual lack of 






SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



production monej and time. Because 
ii a a \i-i\ -li< > 1 1 spot, the ordei comes 
through ". . . and do it cheap. It's onl) 
.in lit' So an I.I ). i- diliv ered and 
"ii looks cheap" . . . devoid ol sparkle. 
II Mm must have "rules," li< >w 
in answer the question posed, how 
aboul "enough money" and "enough 

time." In fact, they're prettj g I 

"rules" for all commercials. 



Wm. Philip Smith, v.p. m 

radio & If. ( Inirlrs II. Il.nl < ■■ . \,„ ),,,/. 

I In- mosl important thing to considei 
before producing an effective I.D. is 
in determine hoM well known mum 
product is in the public eye. If it is a 

new <mc. you will have l<> condense a 

number of selling points into 1<> sec- 
onds a mighty difficult thing to do. 
Better here t" be realistic and face the 

client wilh "onl) one Belling point at 

a time please." 

If your product i> well known, you 
have no Buch problem as above. You 
just need a good idea and you have to 
present it correctly. You ha\e a choice 
ol a lull screen I.I), or a shared screen 




"IJ).'s (ire 

reminder 

advertising" 



I.D. We at our agency prefer the full 
screen. It gives undivided attention to 
the product and in the long run prov€s 
Ii BS COStly to the client. Call letters in- 
serted on shared screen I.D.'s can be 
might) costlj in 50 to 60 cities. 

In preparing the actual I.D., we 
start with the story board and talk 
over our problems with the actual pro- 
ducer. 

\\ e like musical elTects — hut not 
just for the sake of having them. In 
most cases, in keeping with our prin- 
ciples of planned advertising, we tr\ 
to tie in with newspaper, magazine and 
radio advertising. At best I.D.'s are 
reminder advertising. We feel that on 
television the story should he told in a 
one-minute or 20-second spot and re- 
minder in 10 seconds. 

Above all — and this goes hand-in- 
hand with the basic idea — is product 
identification. A clear, true picture of 
the product must be shown at least 
once during the I.D. If it can be sus- 
tained throughout — much better. ^ 



NEWS COVERAGE 
Helps MAKE 

K-NUZ No.1 

Radio Station in Houston 





Big Mike X99 



Big Mike No. 1 



r*T 






Big Mike No. 2 



Big Mike No. 3 



plus 



Houston's Largest News Staff 
(6 FULL-TIME NEWSMEN) 

MAKE K-NUZ 1st in NEWS 

No. 7 in Hooper, Pulse, Nielsen 
and Cumulative Pulse 




HOUSTON'S 24 HOUR MUSIC AND NEWS 



National Reps.: Forjoe & Co. — 

New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • 
San Francisco • Philadelphia • Seattle 



Southern Reps.: 

CLARKE BROWN CO.— 

Dallas • New Orleans • Atlanta 



IN HOUSTON, CALL DAVE MORRIS, jAckson 3-2S81 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



59 




A city is vibrant. A city grows. But the heart of a city never changes. At WCAU, we're 
proud of our Philadelphia tradition and this month, our 35th Anniversary, we are honoring 
all the yesterdays that have served us so well. Some of us can still see the long parade of 
personalities associated with WCAU. Al Jolson sang his first song on radio over WCAU, 
Fred Allen made his first radio appearance with us. Paul Douglas, Ezra Stone, Boake Carter, 
Henry Morgan, Wilbur Evans, all began bright careers at WCAU. 

Yes, we have grown since we were issued our first broadcast license in 1922. And our 
50,000 watts aren't the real measure of growth. It's the long list of public service awards — 
the confidence of advertisers that helped make 1956 the greatest in our history. But, most 
of all, it's the acceptance we enjoy in the 2 million homes in 47 counties to which each day 
we bring news, information and entertainment. 



WCAU 



Philadelphia 



riixIJli \3 The Philadelphia Bulletin Radio Station. 
Represented nationally by CBS Spot Sales. 
By far Philadelphia's most popular station. Ask Pulse. Ask Philadelphians. 



60 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



I.l\ listing "i ' hat 
advertising and broadcast fields 



NEW AND R 



NEW ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

California Packing, SF 

Columbia Pictures. NY 

Columbia Pictures, NY 

Columbia Pictures. NY 
Evinrude Motors. Milwaukee 
Ex-Lax. Brooklyn 



Ex-Lax. Brooklyn 

Ex-Lax, Brooklyn 

Ex-Lax. Brooklyn 

Ccneral Mills. Minneapolis 

Cillcttc. Boston 
Cillcttc. Boston 
Cillcttc. Boston 
Kendall Co. Chi 

Lanvin Parfums, NY 

Pontiac Div — CM, Pontiac, Mich 



AGENCY 

Mc-E. SF 

Donahue & Coc. NY 

Donahue & Coe. NY 

Donahue & Coe. NY 
Cramcr-Krasselt. Milwaukee 
Warwick & Lcgler. NY 

Warwick & Lcglcr, NY 

Warwick & Lcgler, NY 

Warwick & Lcglcr. NY 
DFS. NY 



Maxon. Detroit 
Maxon. Detroit 
Maxon, Detroit 
Leo Burnett. Chi 



North. NY 

MacManus. J & A. Bloom- 
field Hills. Mich 



Princeton Knitting Mills, NY Ehrlich, Neuwirth & Sobo, 

NY 
BBDO. NY 



Reader's Digest. Plcasantvillc. NY 



STATIONS 

NBC 188 

NBC 155 

NBC 173 

NBC 158 
NBC 158 
NBC 170 

NBC 173 

NBC 176 

NBC 158 
NBC 158 

CBS 204 
CBS 202 
CBS 202 
CBS 201 

CBS 20 

NBC 188 

NBC 158 
CBS 201 



PROGRAM, time, start, durotion 

News on the Hour, M-F 7 jm II pm \ spon; 20 Miy; 

26 wks 
Bandstand; M-F 1030-11 pm. II 05 12 n one mm parties. 

24 |unc; 3 wks 
People Arc Funny; W 8:05-830 pm . one mm parties, 24 

|un. 3 wks 
Monitor; one mm parties; 24 |u 
Monitor: 5 onc-min parties per wkend 21 lu*- 
Crcat Cildcrslccvc; Tu 8 05-8:30 pm I partir 

Apr; 34 wks 
People Arc Funny; W 8 05-8 30 pm ; 1 pjrtic . • .. 

Apr; 34 wks 
One Man's Family; M F 7 45 8 pm I pan Mr wt JO Apr; 

34 wks 
Monitor, 1 partic per wk ; 30 Apr, 34 wks 
Monitor; 5 onc-min & 5 thirty sec parties each w» 

both Fibber McCec O Bob Ray segs 1 June 52 « • 
Kentucky Derby; Sa 5 15-5 45 pm 4 May only 
Prcakncss: Sa 5:30-6 pm: 18 May only 
Belmont; Sa 4 30-5 pm. 15 June only 
Arthur Godfrey 10 45-11 am. 28 June. 30 Aug only Th 

10:30-10:45 am; 4 |uly; 10 wks 
Stock Market News; M F 6 10-1 15 pm . 15 Apr; 9 wks 

News on the Hour; M-F 7 am-11 pm ' 4 spon; 29 Apr 3 wks 

Monitor; parties in 10 Bob & Ray segs each wkend; 20 July: 

7 wks 

Arthur Codfrey; W 10:15-10 30 am; 24 Apr; 26 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 

Perry B. Bascom Westinghousc Broadcasting. NY. eastern sis mgr 

Ccorge Bowe WTIC, Hartford, production mgr 

Kent Burkh.irt . KXOL. Fort Worth, program dir 

Robert C. Burris K|BS. SF. sis exec 

Neil Cline WHAS. WHAS-TV, Louisville, stns mgr 

|im Coryell WINZ. Miami 

Chalmers Dale CBS Tv, NY, super broadcast film operations — film si 

dept 

Ccorge H. Crccn WATV. WAAT. Newark, program mgr 

Ceorge Hobkirk KIBS. Bishop, Cal. acting stn mgr 

Warren D. Johnson Ccneral Outdoor Advtng, Chi, sis engineer 

Lester Locb WMCM. NY 

Robert Macdougall WATV, WAAT. Newark, educational dir 

Helen Nugent WKRC, Cin. "Helen Nugent Show' 

Ed Paul WERE, Cleve. merch 

Robert O. Paxson KTVH. Wichita-Hutchinson, local & regional sis mgr 

Ceorge Rice WABC-TV. NY, program dir 

Yale Roe WBKB, Chi, merch mgr 

Dean Shaffner ABC Radio Net. NY. vp chg sis devel & research 

E Charles Straus CBS Tv. Hy. asst to dir business affairs 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, nat radio sis mgr 

WTIC-TV. Hartford, production mgr 

WQAM, Miami, program dir 

KSAN. SF, gen mgr 

Henry I Christ al Chi. office mgr 

WQAM. Miami, sis 

Same, asst mgr — film services dept 

Same, dir publicity promotion & advtng 

K-ACE, Riverside, Cal. program dir 

WNDU-TV. South Bend-Elkhart. acct exec 

ABC Film Syn. NY. acct exec 

Same, public relations 

Same, also WKRC-TV. dir community relations 

Same, also nat sis mgr 

KETV. Omaha, sis mgr 

KCO-TV. SF. program dir 

KCO-TV. SF nat spot sis mgr 

NBC Tv Net Sales, NY dir sis ping 

Same, dir talent 6 casting 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

John R. Burrill 
John D. Carew. Jr. 
Robert E. Field 
Henry C. Fownes 
Harold D. Frazee 
Ben Ccdalccia 
Edward P. Heath 
Robert W. Hocbec 
L. C. Hopper 
H. K. Jones 



Ralph H. Major, |r. 
Basil W. Matthews 
James W. McFarland 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Charles R. Schwab 
Sherman Slade 
William N. Troy 
Dik W. Twcdt 



Fairmont Foods. Omaha 

Time, Inc . NY 

MacManus. John & Adams. NY. vp chg office 
Bryan Houston. NY. acct super 
BBDO. NY, member plans board 
Monsanto Chemical, product mgr 

Conti Advtng, Ridgewood. N|, acct exec & research dir 
Carpenter Advtng. Cleve. vp 

Brooke. Smith, French & Dorrance. Detroit vp & dir 
mktng & research 

B8DO. NY. dir public relations 

_Ogilvy, Benson & Mather. NY. acct exec 
Crowell-Collier. NY 



Dun & Bradstreet. NY. mkt ping 

Dan B. Miner. LA. acct super 
McGraw-Hill News Bureau, Cleve. asst dir 
Kenyon & Eckhardt Chi. research dir 



NEW AFFILIATION 

William Schallcr W Hartford client service staff 
Zimmcr. Keller & Calvert, Detroit, research dir 
.MacManus. |ohn & Adams. NY. asst acct exec 
Same, admin committee 
Same, also vp 

Same also vp chg research 
Ted Bates. NY. acct exec 
| M Hickcrson. NY. acct exec 
Dn & Eaton. Cleve. acct super for advtng 

Criswold-Eshlcman. Cleve. dir mktng & research 

Same, vp chg public relations 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY. vp & acct super 

Kctchum. MacLeod & Crovc. Pitts, project mgr-^ktng £• 

research dept 
Kctchum. MacLeod & Crovc. Pitts, mkt research analyst 
Mayers Div — C&W. LA exec vp 
Dn & Eaton. Cleve. acct super for publicity 
Leo Burnett. Chi. acct exec 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



61 



SERVETH 
North Central Wisconsin 

on 

WSAU-TV 




A 

TEMPTING 

DISH FOR 

ADVERTISERS 

COMPRISED 

OF THE 

BEST INGREDIENTS 

Here is the recipe:* 

Mix 171,000 HOMES 
with $567,064,000 
RETAIL SALES. 

Add $207,408,000 
in GROSS FARM IN- 
COME. 

SERVES: 540,420 pop. 



YOU CAN BUY ALL THESE 
INGREDIENTS AT YOUR 
LOCAL MEEKER CO. OR 
HARRY HYETT STORE. 

DO IT TODAY!! 



►SOURCE: 1956 SRDS ESTIMATES 
of Consumer Markets. 




WAUSAU, WIS. 

OWNED ANO OPERATED BY 
WISCONSIN VALLEY TELVISION CORP 



(.2 



profile 



Philip McHugh: Detroit-to-N. Y. commuter 

I'liil M( 1 1 nuh won't go so far as to say that he's a Detroit-New 
York commuter, but let's put it this way: If you happen to call 
Campbrll-Kuald in New York, chances are that the agency's tv-radio 
head has either just come in from Detroit or is just racing back. 

The commuting that McHugh, as a good Detroiter, does between 
his office and the Birmingham, Mich., home where he lives with his 
wife and daughter, is alone sufficient to make any man blase about 
traveling. 

Commenting on Detroit as an active advertising center, McHugh 
finds that the occasional inconvenience of a spread-out city is more 
than compensated for by staff stability. "Our creative people seem 
to stay with us longer.' 

As for long-distance network negotiations? "No problem at all,"' 




Give the show a chance, you might tell a dog in 13 weeks, but seldom a success 

says McHugh. "On the contrary: It cuts down discussions." 

Among the agency's major tv-radio accounts are Chevrolet, GM's 
Delco Products Division, the United Motors Service Division, 
GMAC, Goebel Brewing, to mention a few. Over the past three 
years, tv and radio have accounted for an increasing percentage of 
the agency's total billing. Out of total 1956 agency billings, about 
28% was in air media. 

New buys for Chevrolet for next fall include the hour-long Sunday 
night Chevy Shotv with Dinah Shore and Pat Boone Thursdays 
9:00-9:30 p.m., ABC TV. 

Extremely cost-conscious, McHugh negotiated a unique contract 
for the '57-'58 Chevy Show. 

"We don't believe you should pay a set package price for a show."' 
he told SPONSOR. "Each program's cost should depend on each 
week's production. A package price very often is based on an in- 
flated average. Naturallv there has to be a maximum budget, but 



SPONSOR 



11 may 1957 






TWO TOP CBS 
TWO BIG 



radio stations 



Southwest Markets! 



ottt tow co Sr 

Cot** 1 * 1 * 011 ««• Packa 9e , 




When you're making out that sched- 
ule for the Southwest this sales- 
winning pair of CBS stations is a 
"must". TWO top stations ... in 
TWO big markets ... at ONE low 
combination rate. For availabilities 
and rates, write, wire or phone our 
representatives. 



THE KENYON BROWN STATIONS 

Now u ndtr on a ownarthip and m a n a ga ma nt 



National Representatives JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



SPONSOR • II mu 1957 






You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nations smartest 
tiliie-buvers w ho select WGN 
for results! 1957 promises 
exciting new programming to 
make WGN's policy of high 
quality at low cost even more 
attractive to you. 



3rd TV MARKET 

in 

PENNSYLVANIA 

. . . and only WJAC-TV really 
covers this rich Southwestern 
Pennsylvania area. . . . 

• Over a million TV homes! 

• 41-county coverage with 
20 key counties showing 
80 to 100% coverage! 

• Proved audience prefer- 
ence^ — WJAC-TV leads in 
7:00-11:00 P.M. periods 
105 to 7 over Station "B" 
. . . has 24 out of the 25 
top night-time shows. 




Ger full details from your KATZ man! 



64 



Agency Profile continued 



other than that, each show - costs should be determined individ- 
ual!) . 

"Winn we set up the ('.hay Show for next \ ear, we insisted on 
a particular executive producer because we felt that his inter- 
esl in costs was an asset to us. I be client needs someone as well 
as the agenc) holding the cosl line where network tv is concerned." 

\l< Hugh feels that tv costs are the one "big caution to watch in 
an otherwise fabulousl) advantageous medium."" Alreadv costs have 
forced a pattern of split sponsorship, which McHugh deplores. 

"Except for certain specific package goods, you need the continu- 
il\ of a whole show for good client identification."" sa\s McHugh. 

"We feel that a variet) show tends to give better basic sponsoi 
identification and certainly better opportunity for commercial inte- 
gration. You get an association between the client and the person- 
ality In the case of Chevy, that's Dinah Shore, of course." 

McHugh has an intriguing theor\ on the relationship between 
high-cost talent and tv homes reached. He says, "We look at tv a 
little as il we were bankers. We feel vou have to get value for your 
investment." 

Networks are anxious to drop bad shows 

"For instance."" he points out, "by spending another $100.(M)0 and 
adding another big name star to a varietv show, v ou might add 
extra homes to your audience. That addition may even catapult you 
into the top 10. but the extra S100.000 on a cost-per-home basis 
ma) not be a sound advertising investment. This is a case in point 
where ratings tell only part of the story." 

In interpreting ratings. McHugh warns, a client must give a show 
an even break. "You might tell a dog in 13 weeks but seldom a 
success." Furthermore, a dramatic show takes longer to prove itself 
than a variety format, he feels. 

"I'm not sure shorter contracts are the answer, although we've 
had that tv pe of arrangement with independent packagers. We could 
decide to cancel after six or eight weeks and be off the air bv the 
20th week. Where a network contract is concerned. I have found 
that the network usuallv is as anxious as the client to get rid of a 
bad show." 

McHugh bad ample chance to delve into network operation as a 
CBS director years back. He actually got into radio in 1936 while 
studying at Notre Dame. At that time he did writing, directing and 
announcing for several hours of programing each week from the 
campus studios of WSBT, the CBS outlet in South Bend. 

After leaving Notre Dame in 1938. he became an apprentice at 
CBS, and continued an adult education course in radio at NYU. 
Research and new program ideas were his babv when he became a 
CBS staff director. 

"There's a difference in responsibility between directing network 
shows and being radio-tv head of an agency," McHugh told SPONSOR. 
"Your perspective towards clients is different and. of course, you've 
got a different relationship with the other creative members of the 
production unit. I feel that having been on the network side of di- 
recting. I ma) be somewhat more aware of production problems and 
cosl factors than if I'd grown up in agencies throughout these 
years." 

"This coming year at Campbeil-Ewald, we're looking forward to 
our most active network tv season."' he told SPONSOR. As fall ap- 
proaches, his chances of ever getting his traveling kit unpacked are 
verv slim. ^ 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




Without M«lng I Ik- dial list<-n<iM know 
when they arc tuned to WSII Itadio. 

Tin indi id so md ha been a< hi* 

at no loss to tin in: •. and statun 

radio. It ba pl< • ■ mnd l h«- audiem «• 

like- n. Elating r< fled it. 

An Atlanta ad agent . exe< utive — 

"I think thf different, disi h mnd "i 

WSB Radio i- prool oi n - uperioi 

A Gadsden, Ala., radio 
"The brightest sound in town you aj I 
the brightest sound anywhere. I know bet 
my tuner brings in a lot oi jtatii 

A competitive Atlanta radio station 

executive- "Let'- lace it. The besl 
sounding radio station in Atlanta i~ WSB." 

Advertisers, who feel that there i- | 
much "sameness" in currenl radio. 
have found that the sound oi WSB is 'he 
soundest buy in Georgia. 

H /. /.,,.- o in../ WSB-T\ I "anfa 

Journtil (in./ ' 




Atlanta's WSB radio 
\> SOUNDS different 

from any other 

Georgia station 



SPONSOR 



11 \m 1957 



65 



National and regional spot buys 
in a oil, now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

General Foods Corp., Maxwell House Div., Hoboken, New Jerse\ . is 
going into selective markets in Washington, Oregon and California 
for its Yuban coffee. Six-week campaign will run into June; 10-sec- 
ond commercials will be placed during nighttime segments, targeted 
for a mixed audience. Vverage number of announcements per week 
in each market will be 10-15. Film commercials will promote the 
theme "deep. dark, delicious ^ uban coffee." Buying is completed. 
Buyer: Bob Myers. Agent \ : Benton & Bowles, New York. 

Florida Citrus Comm., Lakeland. Fla., is buying in many Eastern 
markets. Campaign will begin in late May and run for a month. 
Minute announcements will be scheduled during daytime hours to 
reach women. Average number of announcements per week in 
each market will be 10. Commercials will be on film. Buying is 
not completed. Buyer: Jack Giebel. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New 
York. 

E. J. Callo Winery, Modesto, Cal., is entering 35 to 40 markets 
throughout the country to advertise its wines. Campaign will begin 
in late May for 13 weeks; in some markets it runs for 52 weeks. 
Half-hour films will be slotted during nighttime hours. They in- 
clude: // / Had a Million, Martin Kane and Silent Service. Tv com- 
mercial will be on film, radio will be live. Buying is not completed. 
Buyer: Jan Stearns. Agency: Doyle Dane Bernbach Inc., New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

United Fruit Co., New York, is entering 50 markets to advertise its 
bananas. Minutes and breaks will be scheduled for daytime during 
the short-term campaign. Average number of announcements per 
week in each market will be 50. E.t.'s and live announcements will 
be slanted to women. Buying is completed. Buyers: Ted Wallower 
and Millie Padova. Agency: BBDO, New York. 

Stop-Save Trading Stamp Corp., Hackensack, is purchasing an 
nouncements in many markets to push its Triple S Blue Stamps 
Campaign will start in early June for 13 weeks. Minute announce 
ments will be placed from morning to late afternoon; average num 
ber of announcements per week in each market will be 20-25. E.t 
commercials feature man-on-the-street theme. Buying is not com 
pleted. Buyer: Jim Williamson. Agency: Hilton & Riggio, New York 

Sinclair Refining Co., New York, plans to expand in radio markets 
throughout the country. The compam is negotiating for saturation 
plans in approximately 450 cities on 900 radio stations on a 52- 
week ba-' i age number of announcements per week will range 
l 10 in lesser markets to 200 in major cities. Starting date is 
1 June. Brief 5-second live announcements promoting safe driving 



06 







Be sure to shoot 
IN COLOR . . . 
You'll be glad you dit k 




rust 



■ M9* your 
Aunt Abby. . . too far 




"ler opinions are interesting— of course. 
\nd she's sure to let you know — par- 
icularly when they concern television. 
iut neither she nor all your other rela- 
ives should have too great a voice in 
evaluating a show. That's a job for 
jre-testing with impartial audiences. 



How?— By having the show on film. Then 
you can test all you want— from here to 
Timbuktu — economically, efficiently. 

And on film, when you want to make 
changes— you just splice 'em in ! That's 
why a good show is a better show on 
EASTMAN FILM. 



For complete information write to: Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division Midwsi Division West Coast Division 

342 Madison Ave. 1 30 East Randolph Drive 6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 

,. New York 1 7, N.Y. Chicago 1 , III. Hollywood 38, Calif. 

IOT W. J. GERMAN, Inc., Agents for the sale and distribution of Eastman -Professional 
Motion Picture Him, Fort Lee, N.J.; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Calif. 



Spot buys continued. 




there's 
something 
special 



dudM 

ouj 'saAi;B;uasajday H'H 

Aq paiuasajcley 

aailUDA — jvninw — jgy 

s »ea\ 000'S — sap^oonH Olf'l 

^riDipauuoQ 'pjoj^JBfj 



it's a 

TELE-BROADCASTERS 

station 



TELE-BROADCASTERS, Inc. 

41 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill Y-8436 

H. Scott Killgore, President 

Owners and Operators of 
WPOW, New York, New York 
KALI, Pasadena, Los Angeles, Calif. 
KUDL, Kansas City, Missouri 
WPOP, Hartford, Conn. 
WKXV, Knoxville, Tennessee 



68 



will be played during earl} morning and late afternoon hours. Bu\- 
ing i> half completed. Buyers: Kay Shanahan and Alice Middleton. 
Agenc) : Morey, liumm & Warwick. Inc.. \rw York- 
General Foods Corp., \\ bite Plain-. \. ^ .. will enter 40 markets to 
sell its Certrol and Sure-Jell products, aids in making jelly. Cam- 
paign begins 3 June and runs for six weeks. Minute live announce- 
ments will he scheduled during daytime hours Monday through 
Friday to reach women. Average number of announcements per 
week in each market will be 10-15. Buying has just started. Bu\er: 
Kay Brown. Agency: Young & Ruhicam. New York. 

Shu I ton, Inc., New York, is going into 22 markets to promote its 
Bronz-Tan sun tan lotion. Four week campaign begins 24 May. 
Minute announcements will be scheduled on weekends during late 
afternoon hours to reach a mixed audience. Number of announce- 
ments per week will range from 10-12 in minor markets to 26-47 in 
major ones. Commercials will be e.t.'s and live. To advertise the 
Old Spice line for men, minutes will be slotted for two weeks in 
October and two weeks in December. Buying has been completed. 
Bu\er: Joe Knap. Agency: The Wesley Associates, New York. 



RADIO AND TV BUYS 

Browndow, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., is going into major Eastern radio 
and tv markets to advertise its Breath-O-Pine. Purchases for the 
13-week campaign will be staggered. Minute live announcements 
will be scheduled during nighttime hours in tv, daytime and night- 
time hours in radio. Frequency will vary from market to market. 
Buying is not completed. Buyer: Bobby Reid. Agency: Abbott 
Kimball Co., Inc., New York. 



Hercules Powder Co., Wilmington, Del., is buying announcements 
for its insecticide in about 18 radio markets and the same number 
of tv markets (the radio and tv markets are different). Frequency 
for the 13-week campaign is limited. In tv, live announcements will 
be scheduled during daytime hours in and around farm and news 
shows; in radio, around farm shows. Buying is not completed. 
Bluer: Bernie Rasmussen. Agency: Fuller & Smith & Ross. New "l ork. 



The Diamond Match Co., New York, is entering radio and tv mar- 
kets from New England to Virginia to promote its Charcoal Briquets, 
a product for home barbecue. Schedule begins weekend of 22 May 
for six successive weekends. Plan is to push the product heavily- 
Memorial Day and 4 July. In tv, minutes and 20's will be slotted 
during late evening hours to reach an adult audience. Average 
number of announcements per week in each market will be five. In 
radio, live announcements will be broadcast in major markets 7-9 
a.m. and 4-6 p.m. Frequency per week in each market will be 42. 
Tv commercials will be filmed, radio commercials live. Buying is 
completed. Buyer: A. H. Griffith. Agency: Doremus & Co., New York. 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 







Nowadays, everyone calls this "bleeding whites 



n 



Time was when this phenome- 
non went by a variety of names- 
all describing an overloading con- 
dition in which white areas appear 
to How irregularlj into black areas. 

Today, everyone in the transmis- 
sion end of TV ealls it "bleeding 
whites." \nd the same common 
language covers the scores of other 
signal patterns that appear on 
oscilloscopes. 

It's a brand-new language, coin- 
piled in a Bell System book called 



"Television Signal Analysis." Net- 
work technicians and Bell System 
men teamed up to write it. I heir 
purpose: to give precise definitions 
to a uniform sel ol terms. I hat 
way, when describing picture qual- 
ity, they'd all be talking about the 
same thing. 

This co-operative effort pays off 
dozens of times a day. It gives the 
TV industry one more assurance 
that the signals carried over Bell 
System lines will be of high quality. 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM _/2\ 



i ooklet, 

I ' ■ -Mil Corns 
ram, American 
phone 8 relegrapl Compai 
P.irk Vven V>>rk. 



Providing intercity channels tor network television ami radio throughout the nation 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



69 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers who select WGN 
for results! 1957 promises 
exciting new programming to 
make WGN's policy of high 
quality at low cost even more 
attractive to you. 




PRODUCTS FOR YOUR 
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2 West 46th St., New York 36, 




4S SZf' 







News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Philip Morris has joined the ranks 
of advertisers that have adopted 
to the marketing organizational 
concept and has appointed George 
Weissman to the newly ereated 
post of director of marketing. 

Weissman will l>e responsible for 
directing and coordinating sales, ad- 
vertising, market research, packaging 
and public relations. 

Ross R. Millhiser, formerly Marl- 
boro brand manager, will be assistant 
director of marketing. 

Westinghousc also this week in- 
stalled a vice president in charge 
of marketing. 

The new post goes to James H. 
Jewell. 

The dropping of co-op advertising 

has forced car dealers at the local level 
to up their own budgets — as witness 
the Dodge dealers in San Francisco. 
Campaign for the San Francisco area 
has been expanded with a total bud- 
get of $21,000 authorized— and $19,- 
500 of this has been earmarked for 
radio. Funds will be used to sponsor 
a 15-minute show of Lawrence \\ elk 
recordings plus expanding present spot 
expenditures. . . . American Dairy 
Association returns to network radio 



iNBO starting 3 June. Initial empha- 
sis will be on the "June is Dairv 
Month campaign. Fall air media 
plans for the Association include one 
third sponsorship on alternate weeks 
'il NBC l\ s Perry Como Show. 

New products: \\ isk, Lever Hi"-, 
liquid laundry detergent, will get ex- 
tensive tv backing. Armour is intro- 
ducing two new cheeses in its Miss 
\\ isconsin line, freshly shredded ched- 
dar and cheddar cheese cubes. 



Lloyd A. Grobe has been appointed 
advertising manager for Oldsmobile 
i division of General Motors). Grobe 
succeeds L. F. Carlson who retired 
last week. 



AGENCIES 

These world wide figures on tv 
coverage were offered by James 
von Brunn of McCann-Erickson 
International tv production de- 
partment in his talk before the 
International Advertising Associ- 
ation this week: 

West Europe: 135 tv stations: 8,- 
368.100 receivers: 39 '/< increase in 
receivers over January 1956. 

Latin America: 54 stations: 1.190,- 
000 receivers: 92 ' '<_ increase. 

\ Please turn to page 74 I 




ENTIRE STAFF OF WCAU (radio), Philadelphia, poses fur 35th-anniversarj family portrait 
during week-long celebrations (5-11 May). Donald W. Thornburgh, president and gen- 
eral manager of the WCAI stations, is standing fifth from the right in the front row 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



AFTER 
HEARING 

THE 
EVIDENCE.. 



r 







ft 



\l 






LISTENERS 





CBS RADIO! 
















There's onlj one set of nationwide 
awards in broadcasting in which 
the sole judges are the people— the 

nation's audiences themselves. 
This bench" ha8 JUSI handed down 
its 1956-57 derisions. And the\ 

form one of the clearest expressions 
of public approval ever registered 
for program performance l>.\ a 
radio net u ork. 

For CBS Radio: 18 awards given to 
II programs and slurs. More than 
for any other broadcaster, radio 
or television. More, in fact, than for 
all other radio networks combined. 

And America's leading advertisers 
concur. CBS Radio at t racts 
more of the nation's .'>() biggest 
advertisers than any other radio 
network. 

It follows. The programs people 
seek out and enjoy most are here. 
So it's the logical place for 
advertisers to he— to reach radio's 
largest and most responsive 
audiences. tv radio xirroi 



V V V V V Y 



>:< 
<* 

>:■ 
* 
* 

V 

.;. 
>;•■ 
* 

4J 

* 

* 



<& 



■■ 3 



HERE ARE THE 

WINNERS 

. I mos ' n' A iuly Music If 'ill 
CBS Radio Workshop 
A rthur Godfrey Time 

Gunsmoke 
Robert Q. Lewis Show 

Art Linklt tt< r's Hon sf Parti/ 

Mitch Miller Show 

Romance of H< /> n Tn nt 

Strike It Rich 
with Warren Hull 

Lowell Thomas 

Young Dr. Malone 






< J 

V 



j. .\ .\ .: *. .\ .\ .\ .: .\ .\ .\ j, .\ .\ j. 



...AND 
ADVERTISERS 
CONCUR 








UPSTREAM 




Selling products is an upstream 
battle in today's competitive 
market. It takes power to make 
headway ... to channel adver- 
tising skillfully over shoals and 
into homes of receptive prospects. 

WSAZ-TV can do this for you 
in the rich Ohio River market. 
Blanketing 69 important coun- 
ties with half a million TV 
homes, its power is measurable 
both in ERP and in viewer ac- 
ceptance, persuasive selling 

No other medium approaches 
WSAZ-TV's broad popularity. 
Nielsen shows (for example) a 
nighttime, weekday superiority 
of 100,580 homes for WSAZ- 
TV over the next-best station. 

This kind of penetration and 
preference gets advertising re- 
sults . . . and can propel you to 
new sales levels in America's in- 
dustrial heart. Any Katz office 
can help you harness WSAZ- 
TV to get you upstream faster. 




HUMTINGTOM-CHARL ESTQi N. W. VA. 

w~m~Q- srarawou; 

Affiliated with Radio Stations 
WSAZ. Huntington & WKAZ, Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 
Represented by The Katz Agency 



Near East, South Asia. Africa: 5 
stations; 5,800 receivers. 

Soviet orbit: 48 stations; 1.477,800 
receivers: 3995 increase. 

I . S.: 498 stations, 39,000,000 re- 
ceiver-. 

Canada: 35 stations: 3,000,000 re- 
ceivers; 509? increase over July 1952. 

World total is 750 stations, 53,529.- 
300 receivers. 



Here's a list of the outstanding 
commercials as picked by the 
AAAA committees on improve- 
ment of advertising content and 
on television and radio adminis- 
tration: 

Ted Bates: Colgate "Tunnel of Love". 
BBDO: Lucky Strike series, Schaefer 
series. 

B&B: Parliament "Restaurant Coun- 
ter," Ivory Snow "Gossip," Prell 
"Lorgnette," Tide "Me Too," Zest 
"Underwater," Maxwell House "Couple 
Bouquet" and "For that good coffee 
flavor." 

Burnett: Marlboro "Filter, flavor, flip 
top box," Tea Council "Take tea and 
„ee. 

Calkins & Holden: Prudential 
"Home is the Center" and "Lion & 
Mouse." 

Campbell Ewald: Chevrolet "Champs 
of the Alcan Run," "Salute to the '57 
GM Cars," "Close Inspection." and 
"Rebus"; National Bank of Detroit 
"Monev Machine." 

Campbell-Mithun: Snowy Bleach 
"Music Box." 

Compton: Crisco "Grandpa's Story,' 
Ivory Soap "World on a String." Blue 
Dot Duz "Dancers," Royal Crown 
"Mardi Gras," Socony "April" and 
"Cartoon Faces. ' 

D'arcy: Budweiser "Pettigrew Series." 
DCSS : Ipana "My Daddy" and "Sales- 
man. ' 
Estv: Evereadv series. 



LAKE CHARLES 

the 
OK Negro Radio Buy 



KAOKH1 




YOU SELL 

Louisville 

When 

You Use 




Jack Bendt 

For eight years, Jack Bendt has been 
the radio guest of ten's of thousand's 
of Kentuckiana homes 7 to 9 each 
morning and from I I to 2:30 during the 
noontime hours, Monday through Sat- 
urday. In a friendly, yet forceful, 
pleasant yet persuasive manner, he has 
become the TOP AIR-SALESMAN in 
the Area. We suggest you check his 
ratings, and compare his results and 
you will find you need Jack Bendt to 
"TELL and SELL" the rich Kentuckiana 
Market. 



Represented by 
lohn Blair & Co. 



WKLO 

LOUISVILLE •%" 



71 



SPONSOH 



11 MAY 1957 



FCBi Kleenex napkins "Mr Manners," 
Kleenex "Little Lulu and Orchestra 
Leadei . Meadow < lold "' heese 
Moon, Papei Mate "Joe I . Brown 
series, Rheingold "Mr. Magoo," Pep- 
sodenl "You'll wondei where the Yel- 
low Went." 

Fuller «X Smith A H«»-~: Ucoa 
" Ucoa Label," " Aluminum Furniture" 
.mil "( iare-free I i\ ing. 
Hixson X Jorgensen: Richfield 
" I In .111.1- \l itchell at ^.i- station." 
K&E: RCA Victoi "Red Glove," "Im- 
pac Case," and "Floating Portables"; 
Pepsi-Cola "Poll) Bergen .11 Rural Sta- 
tion"; Mercurj "1957 Floating Ride"; 
I ord "Safetj ." 

Kchhiiiii. MacLeod «!C Grove: I asl 
Ohio Gas "Burner with ;i Brain." 
Lang, Fischer & Stashower: Car- 
ling Black Label Beer "New Inquiring 
Photographer." 

McC-E: Westinghouse "Sand Test," 
i hesterfield "Carnival," Bulova "Sculp- 
tor," Standard Oil Y J. "Sampler," 
Gem Blades "Hypnosis," Nabisco 
"Chocolate Cl>i|i" and "I. .una Doone," 
Chrysler "Push Button," Coca-I ol i 
"Talking Figures" and "Sailing." 
Dan B. Miner: Blue Seal Bread se- 
ries, Santa Fe \\ inc. 
[VLB: Johnson Pride "Dinner Date," 
Ken-L Ration "Vet," Johnson Stride 
"Animated Splash." Campbell V-8 
"(da—.' Johnson Glo-Coal "Schlutz 
Parade," Ken-L Biskil "Bear Rub." 
JWT: Skol "Sunbathing," Scotl Tis- 
sue "Woman, child in field," Cut-Rite 
"Versatility," Scotkins "Church Sup- 
per," Shell "Chuck & Charlie," Krafl 
"Velveeta Recipe," Eastman Kodak 
"Brownie movie camera," Ford 
"Standing on the Corner," "Knitting," 
"Bonneville" and "Prescription." 





Hf! 


+? 


l*»s 






"7X/ip3^ 


A ^sass 








TS 





Movie Station oj Denver! 

FEATURE LENGTH MOVIES 
EACH WEEK 




FIRST TV STATION to telecast NEWS on the HOUR 
.... EVLRY HOUR! Contact Bio.r TV Associates or 
Hugh Ben Larue, general manager, KTVR. 

^ 

KTVR Channel 



550 Lincoln St. 



Denver, Colo. 



(S/OIV EVEN MORE THAN EVER 

HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 

STOCKTON, CALIF. OCTOBER - DECEMBER 1956 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
7:00 A.M. -12:00 NOON 


RAJ [( 

SETS 

in ■:.:■■: 


c 


1 


KSTN 


*' 


M 






l>+.0 


lW.2 


8.1 


42.1 


11.6 


5.W 


. 


10,163 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


RADIO 

3ZT3 
IN USE 


c 


^ 


KSTN 


A 


M 


OTHER 
AM A FM 


riz 

SIZE 


lo.3y 


n3.3 


6.h 


34.6 


7.0 


11.2 


21.8 


12,1' ■ 



Fall 1956 Hooperatings again 
shows 4-year KSTN dominance 
of *Stockton Radio Audience. 



*America's 92nd Market 



"He just heard over KRIZ Phoenix 
that his house is on fire." 




Represented by Hollingbery 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



. 1 



Y&R: Piel's Beer "Berl & Harry," In- 
stant Sanka "Hands Commercial," Lin- 
coln-Mercurj 'Wordless Commercial," 
Jell-0 Instanl "Lemon and Banana" 
and "Bus) Day," Jell-0 "Chinese 15a- 
|.\ ." Roberl r>in n- "Seacoast." 



Another agency merger: the Chi- 
cago offices of Cunningham & 
Walsh and Beaumont & Bohman 
have joined under the Cunning- 
ham & Walsh banner. 

Henr\ Holiman. presidenl of P»eau- 



monl & Eiohman, will join C&W in an 
advisor) capacity. 

SndT assignments at Compton's 

Hollywood office, now that national 
programing originating in Hollywood 
and local radio-tv have been consoli- 
dated under \l\in Kabaker, work out 
this way: Joe Agnello will he super- 
visor of local tv production, Robert 
Howell and Marjorie Bane continue as 
production supervisors, and Shirle) 
\\ illsori will he business manager for 
the tv group. 



WHLI 

'THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND' 



DELIVERS 

A Major Independent Market 
NASSAU COUNTY 



POPULATION 1,163,100 

BUYING INCOME 

Total $2,928,340,000 

Per Family $ 8,503 

RETAIL SALES $1,534,786,000 

Food Store $ 403,423,000 

Auto Store $ 252,922,000 

Fum. House etc. $ 81,857,000 

Apparel $ 113,070,000 

Cas Stations $ 86,967,000 
Lumber, Bldg., 

Hdware $ 113,879,000 



10th among U.S. Counties 



8th 


among 


U.S. 


Counties 


5th 


" 


U.S. 


Counties 


11th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 


9th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 


11th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 


14th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 


13th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 


10th 


rr 


U.S. 


Counties 



5th " U.S. Counties 

(Sales Management. May 1957) 



One Station WHLI — has a larger daytime audience in 

the MAJOR LONG ISLAND MARKET than any other station! PuiseSurvey) 

SOON WHLI WILL INCREASE ITS POWER TO 10,000 WATTS 



Big Bonus Coverage 

i Nassau, parts of Queens, Suffolk & Brooklyn) 
Population 3,063,135 

Net Income $6,730,794,000 

Retail Sales $3,365,152,000 



WHLI 

HEMPSTEAD 

LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 



AM 1100 
F M 98.3 



iheomof 



Paul Codofsky, Pres. & Cen. Mgr. 
Joseph A. Lenn, Exec. VP Sales 



Represented by Cill-Perna 



( Creative Merchandising has been 
formed 1>\ two former members of 
rlutchins Advertising — H. Pierson 
Mapes and Gene Schiess. The firm 
will specialize in tv packaging, produc- 
tion, consultant work for ad agencies. 
closed-circuit broadcasting, industrial 
trade shows and radio-tv commercials 
production. Client list includes Philco, 
Birge Wallpaper and Crosby Brands. 
First tv production, It's A Hit, will 
debut on CBS TV 1 June. 

New agency appointments: BBDO. 
Toronto, for Pal Blades advertising 
in Canada. . . . PageAoel-Brown for 
DuMont tv receivers. Camphell-Ewald 
resigned the DuMont Labs account last 
week. . . . Noble Advertising, Mex- 
ico City, for Western Airlines new Los 
Angeles to Mexico City route. Noble 
is an associate agency of BBDO. which 
was recent!) appointed to handle West- 
ern's domestic advertising. . . . DFS 
has again been appointed to represent 
the U. S. Army Recruiting Service, the 
Army Reserve and the ROTC affairs 
for the period covering 1 Julv 1957 to 
30 June 1958. . . . Publicidad Badi- 
llo, New York office, to handle all ad- 
vertising for the Spanish market in the 
New York area for Wm. Wriglev. Jr. 
Co. . . . BBDO for the American Pe- 
troleum Institute to supervise special 
tv presentations for the 1959 celebra- 
tion of the 100th anniversary of the 
oil industry in America. . . . Charles 
Anthony Gross Advertising for 
WINZ. Miami: WEAT-AM&TV, Palm 
Beach. 

. . . Grant Advertising for the toilet- 
ries and cosmetics division of Park & 
Tilford. 

NETWORKS 

Mars, which has been out of network 
t\ for a year, will return to ABC TV 
next fall as alternate sponsor of Circus 







SPONSOR 



11 MAY 195' 



Il(i\ i Thursdaj - 7 :30-8 p.m. > . I he 
cand) companj will also pick up an 
alternate week quarter-houi segment of 
l/(< key House Club. 

Mars was |'ic\ iousl) • • 1 1 Mil kej 
Mouse Club in the 1955-56 Beason. 
S< e "( land} Indusl i j Roundup," 
sponsor 1 6 & 2'i Februai j . for con fe< 
lions 1 use "I aii media, i 



I all t\ programing notes: Schick 
bas joined Scotl Paper as the alternate 
- 1 > < > 1 1 - < • t i>n NBC TV's Gisele MacKen* 
Shou starting -<"> September. . . . 
Tfmex Watches will pick uj> the tab 
for six one-hour specials featuring Bob 
Hope on NBC I \ nexl season. Dates 
and tin ic^ have ii"l been set. I>ul as the 
network has a new policj of nol inter- 
rupting the schedule < • t weekly shows 

more than twice each season, the 

~l i < > w - will be seen on diflferenl days 
of the week ami at different hours. 

. . . American 4 Ilii«*I«- has renewed 
Jim Bowie, \I5C TV, Friday 8-8:30 
p.m. . . Sylvania has bought \l>(! 
rV's The Real McCoys Thursdaj 8:30- 
9 p.m. . . . Revlon has signed for the 
// (///<•/ U incheU Show which will take 
the Thursdaj 10-10:30 spot on ABC 
l\. . . . The Big Record which will 
replace Godfrey Time, Wednesday 
nights 8-9 on CBS TV come fall has 
picked up two sponsors, Kellogg and 
Pillsbury. . . . Wild root has joined 
Johnson & Johnson in renewing l\<>l>in 
Hood on CBS T\ Mondays 7:30-8 p.m. 
. . . Purex has signed for a full hour 
on alternate weeks ol CBS TVs I'cin 
Mason Shou- and the new program 
will be mined into the Saturday 7:30- 
8:30 p.m. slot. . . . Greyhound has 

renewed the Steve \llen Show and will 
ride through the 1 ').">7-.~>i! season for a 
half hour on alternate weeks. This fdls 
out the iUen sponsor quota. 



TV STATIONS 

\\ LBR-TV, Lebanon, Pa., resumed 
telecasting last week as member 
of the Triangle Stations family. 

New general manage] ol the station 
i- I rank B. "Bud Palmei . foi met 
eral managei al WSEE, I rie. Leonard 
Savage lake* ovei as operations man- 
agei . Sa^ age comes I rom \\ I BR 
Lebanon. 

\\ I I'd! - IA will operate ii om 3 p.m. 
toll p.m. weekdaj - and 3 p.m. to I " 
p.m. Saturdays and Sundays until the 
station is full} -tailed. 

Cornerstone ceremonj for NIM '- 
new Washington, D. C, building 
which will house W K< and \\ RC- 

T\ was held last week, vice presi- 
dent Richard M. Nixon doing the 
honors. 

The new facility is scheduled to be- 
gin operation in the fall and i- said 

to be the firsl t\ studio in the world 
designed and buill from the ground 
up for color telecasting. 

Tv Applications: Between 29 April 
and 1 Ma\ one construction permit 
was granted, and five application- t « > i 

new stations were filed. 

Construction permit went lo \lkek 
lele\i-ion for Channel 19, Victoria, 
Tex., permit allow- 20 kw visual. 

Applications include: Malco Thea- 
tre-. Memphis for three stations: Chan- 
nel 68. Davenport, la.. 23.32 kw visual, 
with tower 98 feet above average ter- 
rain, plant (124,300, yearlj operating 
cost |] 10,000; Channel 65, Kansas 
City, Mo.. 722 kw visual, with towei 
278 feet above average terrain, plant 
$295,982, vearlj operating cosl $250,- 
000; and for Channel I 1 ). Oklahoma 
Cit\. 22. <'!."> kw visual, with tower 359 
feet above average terrain, plant $135,- 
(i 17. \ early opei ating cosl $1 10,000. 
Other applications were made b} : Das- 



I -\>\ & Tl - B i n of 

fele< istei -. Pa< ifi< Pali- 
1 for I lii mi. I I I 

I i • i • . isual with towei 131 

al...- i rain, p 

•I to 

WJPBTV, I nont. \\ \ .. 

Weston, W. \.i . 100 kw 
\ isual, h ith I 

'■ i rain, planl v I i' earl) op- 

. , itin i osl $90 000. 

New affiliations i HO! I\ K 

[oops, B, < .. has joined CBS I \ 
•id. ii j non-inten onna i>-.! 

. . . . \\ LW-TV, \. . Orleans will 
on the air I Vugusl as a prii 

iniei. onnei ted affiliate of CBS I \ . 

People in the new-: John Babcock 

has been named assist i al man- 

age] foi < roslej - new I ndianapolis t\ 
station, WI.W I. . . . Commander 
Mortimer W . Loewi bas been named 
president and general mana ;ei ol 
\\ II A . Miami. . . . \l Razelwood bas 
joined the local sales stafl al KW I \ . 
Oklahoma < lity. . . . I>«>n K. (.illie- 
has moved up to national sales man- 
age] foi \\ < CO-TV, Minneapolis. Su< • 
ceeding < rillies as directoi ol the mer- 
chandising i- Robert R. Hansen and 
Vrthur C. irnold will move into the 
assistant merchandising directoi -pot. 
. . . Alfred Lewis has been appointed 
business manage] foi \\ II \o.\\ \|;< > 
Chicago. . . . Rosemary Reddens 
Schwartzel bas joined K 1 1'.< \M 8 

I \ a- women - editor. 

RADIO STATIONS 

Idea at work at K ^ \\ . ( le\eland 

is "temperature controlled' sum- 
mer sales plan. 

Summei - ; - sponsors fans 

conditioners, beach equipment, 
can take a.K antage of tin- method : ■< 
morning forecasl of 90 degrees or 
al.... . - |ii annoum ements dur- 




KSON 



San Diego's No. II Radio Station 



PULSE 

"Oat of Horn." ft "In Home' 



K»vi r-enlnl .\.ti.«i.ll> i„- eiiuniK A r. 




SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



:: 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the cation's smartest 

time-luiver- who select WGN 
for results! 1957 promises 
exciting new programming to 
make WGN's policy of high 
quality at low cosl even more 
attractive to you. 



Men in TV production all say: 



"The best spots come from Jamieson 








• ANIMATION 

• SOUND 
STAGE 

• LABS AND 
OPTICALS'; 




JAMIESON 



FILM COMPANY 

3825 Bryan • T A 3-8158 • Dallas 

"clients include: 

Fitzgerald Advertising Agency 
Crawford & Porter Vdvertising, Inc. 
McCann-Erickson, Inc. 
Tracy-Locke Company, Inc." 



ing that day, a prediction of 80 de- 
grees means six messages and a drop 
to 70 degrees or below means no "cool 
coi Trials that day. 



WWIN, Baltimore, joins ABC as an 
affiliate on 1 June. . . . WHB, Kansas 
City, reports a quarter of a century 
advertiser as Allen Chevrolet Co. 
signed for its 25th consecutive year on 
the station last week. . . . William 
Banks of WHAT, Philadelphia, is the 
new president of the Pennsylvania As- 
sociated Press Broadcasters Associa- 
tion. 

Radio stations imitating Tin Pan 
Alley: KFMB, San Diego, has its own 
song, "The KFMB March" written by 
Marine Master Sergeant, Abraham 
Balfoort of the Marine Bandstand 
show. . . . WRVA, Richmond. Va.. 
personality Carl Stutz. is the writer of 
four songs commemorating the 350th 
Birthday of the nation and the James- 
town Festival. 

New appointments: Bob Mansur 

has been appointed promotion man- 
ager for WFAA, Dallas. . . . William 
Du Bois has been added to the local 
staff at WNDU, South Bend. . . . 
Frank Crosiar has become commer- 
cial manager of WMRI, Marion. Ind. 
. . . Allen Ludden has been named 
program director at WCBS, New York. 
. . . Bill Simpson, general manager 
of KTXN, Austin, has taken on addi- 
tional duty of general sales manager 
for KIWW, San Antonio. . . . Joseph 
Savalli has been named director of 
Italian sales for WOV, New York. 



FILM 

An important regional film buy 
by P. Lorillard is being firmed. 

The large (for a national advertiser) 
buy involves the use of Ziv's New Ad- 
ventures of Martin Kane and Harbor 
Command. 

The campaign will be used to launch 
Old Gold's new package line, Ziv re- 
ported. Lennen & Newell is the agency. 




Feature film buys: KBET-TV, Sac- 
ramento, has bought the entire MGM 
package plus 800 RKO features . . . 
KMGM, Minneapolis, has added the 
RKO list to its MGM features . . . 
KOIN-TV, Portland. Ore., purchased 
86 20th Century-Fox features, its 
fourth major feature buy . . . Among 
those bu\ ing Warner Bros, features 
were KWK-TV. St. Louis and KCRG- 
TV. Cedar Rapids. 

Recent appointments: Adolf N. 
Hult. former MBS executive and re- 
cently director of sales development for 
Screen Gems, has been retained b\ 
RKO Teleradio Pictures as a special 
consultant on national sales for the 
RKO Tv division . . . George DeMar- 
tini has been named vice president and 
treasurer of Guild Films. He was a 
general partner of Cohen, Simonson & 
Co., investment brokers. 

FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merril Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 



Stock 



AB-PT 

AT&T 

Avco 

CBS "A" 

Columbia Pic. 

Loew's 

Paramount 

RCA 

Storer 

20th-Fox 

Warner Bros. 

Westinghouse 



Tues. 
30 April 
New York Stock 
23% 



177 :l , 



6- ; , 
34 
17% 
18 :: , 
33 T s 
36' 4 
27 1 - 
27% 
21 
59% 

American Stock 



Tues. 
7 May 
Exchange 

■UK 

177% 

6% 

34% 

18% 

20-\ 

34% 

36¥> 

26% 

27% 

25% 

59% 

Exchange 



Vt 
Change 

+ % 

- y* 

+ % 

• + % 

+i% 

- \ 
+ % 

- % 

- % 
+i% 
+ % 



Allied Artists 
C&C Super 
DuMont Labs. 
Guild Films 
NT A 



3% 
% 
5 

3% 
8% 



NEW ORLEANS 

the 
OK Negro Radio Buy 

ViSOK 



SPONSOR 




11 MAY 1957 



COMMERCIAL BANDWAGON 

[Continued in>m i»i^r 39) 

I iil.im l'li.i\ ii . now tm ning "iii the 
Pall Mall parodj verses foi SSCB, has 
been writing best-selling novels along 
w i 1 1 1 commercials and jingles since 
1926. i He used i" write tin- Ballan- 
tine limei icks .ii J\\ T. i He stresses 
the importance of the lightest <>f light- 
touch in commercials. ** \ slightl) 
tongue-in-cheek approach is best, 
rhayei says. "When you make peo- 
ple laugh, the) maj forget to buy. 
Just use enough humor t < • make them 
open ilnii eai -."' 

"( me "I the dangers in this trend to 
light-touch commercials," Bays rom 
McDonnell, directoi "I program de- 
velopment at Foote, Cone X Belding 
and a mastei "I light-touch himsell 
i lie writes the Rheingold Beer com- 
mercials lyrics and i- hclieved to have 
been firsl to create the concept of j >< >| > 
tune parodies sung bj name Btars) "is 
the bright young copywriter out to <le- 
lighl his co-workers and make a nam" 
for himseli rather than the product. 
Another danger, he says, is the decep- 
tion that an entertaining commercial 
i- a complete departure from hard-sell. 
In ni(i-i ol today's li^ht commercials is 
packed -nine of the hardest sell ever 
h i itten. ( > m 1 \ it's sugar-coated. 

The Parker Fennell) commercials 
for Pepperidge are a good examp'c 
Competitive agenc) cop) heads praise 
them for breaking through the "in- 
gredients barrier." Said one adman. 
"Nothing is harder to tell interestingly 
than a product ingredients story. And 
now along comes a bread with ingredi- 
ents as its hardest sell, and thej man- 
age it in a \\a\ thai compels atten- 
tion." 

Reva Fine, creative head at Ogih . 

Benson Si Mather, under whose direc- 
tion these commercials are written In 
Hill \\ right i two of them were done b) 
a secretary in the copy department, 
Mar\ka\ Hartigan), explains them 
this wa\ : 

"We don't reall) think of them is 
corned) commercial-. Our problem 
was to sell a tarm situation without 
being dull. Our first commercials had 
a woman- voice over sound effect- of 
a barnyard. The) were close hut not 
quite it. Then came the idea for the 
character of Titus Patch, the farmer 
who lives next door to the farm whei : 
Maggie Rudkin hakes her Pepperidge 
Bread and who supplies her with but- 
ter, milk and honey. Fennelly's au- 
thentic and amusing characterization 



of a fai met . pin- th'- fa< t thai hi 
speaking a- tin- raw goods suppliei 
enables him to gel i bs our ingredi- 
ents mi" ~.fji- easil) and ri.it 1 1 ■ alK ." 

\\ \ I \\ - ( .i ogan also sees th'- t rend 

a- inoii- one of chai.n t . - 1 i/.it ion than 

oil omed) . It ma) ha\ e been n\ ived 

h\ the Piil - 1 1. ii i \ and lliil i oninni 
rials, hut he Bees it- rOOtS fai hack in 

i adio histoi \ , I In- Jai k Benn) fell ' • 
commercials in network radio received 

a- much can- in w i iting ami delivei 

a- did the -how- themselves. 

Si 'inc admen an- ni iw wi mdei ing if 
the -kit- ami light dialogues ma) take 
the place of Binging jingles? I he an- 
swer is obviousl) no. Good jingles are 
bettei than ever. The) -till have the 
carry-over value of being hummed b) 
listeners ami sung b) kiddie- long af- 
ter the sets are tinned oil. 

Hut where the) once dominated, 
jingles ma) have to share the spotlight. 

The element ol talent COStS in re I- 

i ii o might have Btarted some sponsors 
considering light "talk" commercials. 
Here are a few cosl figures : 

In the case ol a one-minute singing 
commercial to be used nationally, and 
which could he recorded in an hour. 
the talenl costs would be: Singers, $39 
apiece plus 17.20 for required rehear- 
sal hour: musicians, ^27 per man plus 
$54 for the leader: announcer, $45 
plus $9.60 for required rehearsal hour. 
The new \l II! \ code calls foi a pay- 
ment o| .">' , ol the gross talent cosl to 
the \ITK \ pen-ion and welfare fund. 
There also i- a flat sum of $100 to be 
paid to \I'M- fund. There also is the 
additional cosl of an arranger ami 
copyisl for the music. The orchestra 
is paid once, never gets re-use pay- 
ments. Announcer and singers do, 
however, after 13 week-. 

\ straight corned) dialogue commer- 
cial recorded with no music would cosl 
in talent $45 per actor plus the $9.60 
for rehearsal, with an additional 
of that going to th.- \l"l K \ fund. !>'• 
use payments would begin alter a I !- 

week airing. 'Of COUrse name talenl 
would gel highei lee-. | 

Put talent cost should no! be a prime 
consideration in what t\ pe i ommercial 
you choose, i "ii gel a lot more wear 
from the average jingle than from a 
-kit. Corned) -kit- inu-t he made in 
hulk and rotated frequent!) . 

Vctuall) e\en these i onsiderations 
aren't the final word. You have to 
base your decision on intangibles like 
product image, your position in the 
market- phi- how much faith you have 
in your own sense ol humor. f="* 



NIW YORK CITY 



//r> Do/o^Ci> Struth 
\t4ty si*>tcr v$f"> Dun 

,/tc /./ 



WWKL'S PERSONALITIES SELL 

more n 

I ink" thl NEGRO 

AUDIENCE 

Support i ng 

CONSUMER ADS. . . . 

MERCHANDISING CREWS 

full I . ' 

FREE. . . . 
LOW SELLING COST I 

iriij. . . . 

call or write 




- BEST FOR NEGRO PROGRAMS 




SALES BLOOM 
m THE RICH 
TULSA. 
MARKET... 



WHEN YOU USE 



KPMG 

50,000 WATTS 740 KC 

ASK YOUR 
BLAIR. MAN 
FOR THE 
krmg STORY 



SPONSOR 



11 \m L957 



?' 



Radio Baltimore 

wssm 






if 


HIS 1 


1 I 





I.January thru March 1957 Hooper total rated time periods. 2. March 1957 Hooper Business Establishments Radio Audienee Index. 





A 


B 


C 


WCAO 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


1 


Other 
AM & FM 


l. In homes 


2.4 


9.5 


2.3 


27.7 


18.6 


3.4 


12.7 


15.6 


3.0 


4.7 


3.2 


2. Business Establishments 


4.7 


8.2 


3.3 


33.9 


12.4 


4.3 


11.0 


8.2 


3.2 


7.7 


3.0 



Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc., Stations: 

Radio Boston Radio Chicago Radio Memphis 
WCOP WJJD WMPS 



80 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC. 



SPONSOR • 11 MAY 1957 



If heft happening in U. S. Government 
t/uU affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



II MAY 

Cwvrlih! ISS7 
•P0N80R PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Leave it to the FCC to know when to leap nimbly. 

Hi'' F( < • ommissioners have stalled man) .1 • ongressional inquin even more effective!) 
than the network stud) committee has been halted b) the Elm producers in New \<>A. It's 
always with the bland excuse thai the FCC can't possibl) comment on cases under 
consideration. 

I Inn tlic\ tried this tactic on a Senate Business subcommittee probing the petition of 
daytime radio stations for fixed hours of operation, and here's how things got turned around: 

• The committee's chairman, pepper) Sen. Wayne Morse, blew some ~r 1 .1 r j . blasts at 
FCC (haii man McConnaughe) and McConnaughe} rushed commissioners i raven and 
Dyde over to Morse's hearing, along with a pile of engineering testimony. 

• l!\ the time Morse got through with the pair, the FCC's cat was all the wa) out of the 
bag: The commission was ready to turn down the daytime petition because of 
possible interference with clear channel stations, other stations, ami even with each 
other. 



That rumor about E. K. Mills. Jr., succeeding McConnaughey will most likely 
become fact before long. 

Mills, a Ncn Jersey resident, has heen cleared with the state's Senator-, which means 
more than gossip is involved this time. Mills was with the CAA once. 



The Federal Trade Commission this week took another slap at firms using 
bait ads on radio, tv, and newspapers to sell aluminum storm windows and door-. 

The recipients of FTC citations this time were Mid-Te\ and Vpex \\ indow, of Brooklyn, 
and Ace Window, of Kansas City. 

As charged hv the commission, these firms advertised at ver\ low prices, discouraged pros- 
pects from buying the advertised wares, and then proceeded to try to sell them a more ex- 
pensive line. 

The FCC this week refused to give CBS permission to go on the air with 
KMOX-TV, channel 11, St. Louis, with temporary equipment. 

The refusal was in line with a new policy against tv temporary authorities. 
CBS will have to get its permanent equipment into place before it can begin telecasting 
in St. Louis. 



An unlicensed booster in Bridgeport. Wash., is proving rather ornerj for the 
FCC to shoo off the air. 

The commission issued a cease-and-desist order against the facility. But the appeal- 
court this week has instructed the FCC to come up with a final decision on whether 
to license boosters before trying to enforce anything against the Bridgeport setup. 

The Bridgeport operation is boosting the signals of two Seattle tv stations without their 
permission. 

The FCC has never brought to a head its proceedings on whether I ster stations should 

be allowed. Even though it authorized translators, the onlj action the FCC's taken on boost- 
ers is to issue a flock of cease-and-desist orders. 

The Bridgeport ca9e was a test of these orders. 

The Appeals Court in its decision did not question the FCC's right to issue cease-and-de- 
sist orders. That is. so long as they are based <m a proper foundation. 



SPONSOR 



11 may 1957 



81 



DELIVERING 

896,000 

NOW, with 31S^eO- TV horn 




WNHC-TVis FIRST! 




Program Superiority : In its 14-county area, covering 
896,000 TVhomes,WNHC-TV,NewHaven-Hartford, 
has 95.7% more quarter-hour firsts than the next 
four competing stations combined. 



WNHC-TVis FIRST! 




World's Best Movies : WNHC-TV, New Haven- 
Hartford, has the great MGM, Warner Bros., 20th 
Century-Fox and RKO feature films that have 
topped all competition in market after market. 



WNHC-TVis FIRST! 




Rating Superiority: In its 14-county area, covering 
896,000 TV homes, WNHC-TV's "World's Best 
Movies" pull average ratings 314.3% greater than 
nearest competitor's best feature films. 



HC-TV is FIRST! 



Audience Superiority: In its 14-county area, covering 
896,000 TV homes — sign on to sign off, seven days 
a week — WNHC-TV, New Haven-Hartford, delivers 
average audiences 210% greater than top New 
York City station; 244% greater than Hartford; 
174% greater than New Britain. 

For top-audience availabilities on WNHC-TV, kail KATZ or Triangle's National Sales Office today! 



I 



Sources: ARB, Nine-County Coverage Study, November 1956 
Nielsen NCS #2, 1956 



)P AUDIENCE 




TRIANGLE STATIONS 




WFIL-AM-FM-TV 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 



WNBF-AMFMTV 

BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 

W H G B - A M 

HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

WFBG-AM-TV 

ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 



WNHC-AM-FM-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 



operated by: Radio and Television Dlv. / Triangle Pubiicatio 

WFII_-AM.FM.TV, Philadelphia, Pa. /WNBF-AM.FM «TV, Binghamton. N.Y. 
WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa./ WFBG-AM • TV. Altoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. 

, New York 17, New York 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



Add this to the list of tantalizing information that agencies would like to have from 



II MAY 

Copyright IM7 

sponsor publications inc. sellers: 

How much daytime viewing of the news do women do? 



Madison Ave. discovery: A station operating group might not have chosen the 
corporate title it did had it first consulted the Webster or American Collegiate 
dictionaries. 

The secondary connotation of the title implies a bunch of high-livers. 



Pharmaceuticals, which has just canceled Amateur Hour (ABC TV), is on the prowl 
for a giveaway show that's really offbeat and could turn into a steeper. 
Its budget for tv the coming season again will be over $10 million. 



Electric shavers may use a switch on the strategy that Lanvin uses in selling perfume 
on male-oriented programs. 

Statistics show that 70% of all shaver purchases are made by women as gifts 
for the guys. So a shaver maker is considering buying into women's shows prior to 
Christmas. 



For the ultimate in promotional brass, station managers are probably casting their 
vote this week to: 

The publicity service for a silverplate manufacturer who is urging them to tell local 
department stores and jewelers that the product can be viewed as a giveaway on 
network quiz show. 



Take it from Dun & Bradstreet, when an agency falls apart as a result of client 
delinquencies these days the dollar backwash is bigger than ever. 

A D&B report on agency failures and the liabilities involved shows this progression: 
1955: 31 failures with liabilities at $815,000. 
1956: 32 failures with liabilities at $1,519,000. 



The NBC page boy is to this business 
A list of NBC page boy graduates and their 

Ted Bergmann McCann-Erickson v.p. 

Frank Boehm Adam Young radio research 

Otto Brandt KING-TV-AM gen. mgr. 

Norman (Pete) Cash .TvB president 

Slocum (Buzz) Chapin ABC TV sales v.p. 

Bob Dennison J. Walter Thompson v.p. 

Bob Eastman ABC Radio president 

Frank Egan D. P. Brother v.p. 

Powell Ensign E-McKinney exec. v.p. 



what the newsboy was in the Horatio Alger era. 

current whereabouts would include: 

John Hoagland BBDO tv-radio exec. 

J. Scott Kelk_. N, L & Brorby v.p. 

Tom McFadden NBC o&o v.p. 

Tom McFadyen NBC sales development 

Don Mercer NBC stations relations 

Frank Nesbitt ___CBS Radio sales 

Bill Patterson Grant Adv. v.p. 

Steve Riddleberger ABC admin, v.p. 

Adam Young, Jr Adam Young president 



84 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



KNX 

\t night KNX rea< 

homes in metropolita 

Some 235,000 <>l these home 

the day and the nigh 

can't be reac 

So double your impact in Los 

the KNX audiences. 

metropolitan homes that 
The 21 per cent 
Yes, KNX RADIO'S and 

as day and ni< 




} 



For further details call CBS Radio Spot Sales 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buvers ulm select WGN 
for results! 1957 promises 
exciting new pn igramming to 
make WGN's policy of high 
quality at low cost even more 
attractive to you. 



BMI 



"Milestones" for 
June 

BMI's series of program 
continuities, entitled "Mile- 
stones," foenses the spot- 
light on important events 
and problems which have 
shaped the American scene. 
June- release features four 
complete half-hour shows 

ready for immediate use 

smooth, well written 

scripts for a variety of uses. 

•SCHOOLS OUT" 

(Commencement Is A Beginning) 

June 1. 1957 

"I AM OLD GLORY" 

i Flag Day) 

June 14, 1957 

"FATHERS DAY" 
June 16, 1957 

"THE |UNE BRIDE" 
June 23. 1957 

"Milestones" i- available for 

commercial sponsorship ee >..ur 

local stations for details. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



MARKETING PRODUCT X 

{Continued from page 32 I 

was surrounded with the kind of se- 
crecy vou find at an Atomic Energy 
( iommission project. 

"\\ illi some reps we used alternate 
brand names to confuse the competition 
and keep the test pure." Kemp told 
sponsor. "We did this not because we 
iliiln 1 trust the individual rep. but be- 
cause he might have called on a com- 
petitive agenc) and this sort of knowl- 
edge would necessarily have colored 
his thinking and talking to other buy- 
ers. 

However, the media department's 
job was simplified by far with those 
reps who didn't call on competitors 
and whom the buyer could tell about 
the product — but always in strict con- 
fidence. "For the stations of these 
reps we didn't have to worn about 
competitive adjacencies since thev 
knew what the product was." 

Where the media department sug- 
gested network cut-ins for Product X, 
the buyer had to clear the cut-in with 
other agencies involved in the client's 
daytime network programing. But all 
these details were aetualh handled 
over a period of little over two weeks, 
unlike the more usual national cam- 
paign, where a buyer may have a long- 
er time to work out his bu\s. 

3. Follow-through action: Once 
Product X was safely on the air in the 
two test markets, the marketing man 
assigned to the account moved into 
those two areas for a second visit, call- 
ing on the trade to check the flow of 
merchandise and evaluate pricing, 
shelf position, channels of distribution 
and other marketing factors. 

"We keep a continuous check on the 
flow- of merchandise in the field," says 
marketing man Dave Mitchell. "Just 
this week, for instance, I was up in 
Worcester, Mass., to find out some- 
thing about one of our products. I 
visited 70 stores in the process and 
necessarily found out some things 
about the product other than the spe- 
cific problem I went up there to re- 
search." 

There's a lot of exchange of infor- 
mation between marketing men on dif- 
ferent products, as there is naturally 
between timebuyers assigned to differ- 
ent accounts. In other words, each 
field trip necessarily reveals informa- 
tion other than that related to one 
man's accounts. He passes his find- 




That's rigltt. Chief . . . my independent 

research organization says don't buy, 

wait till you hear what'i happening at 

WPTR. 



Ah*otrq tb 76 wets 




■ 



L_ (T*-f dUicA 



86 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



TERRE HAUTE, 

Indiana's 2nd Largest 
TV Market 



25 J. 970 
TV Homes 



BOLLtNG CO. 
NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 




ROANOKE 

60 County Coverage 

x / W. VA. 
I 
M 

U \ 

M W ' M 

POWER X ~ N . c. / HEIGHT 




ROANOKE 




Ask Your "Colonel" at 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



WDBJtr 



CHANNEL 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



ings along i" the othei men in the de- 
pa] iiiH'tii. 

I be introduction "I Product \ 
|.iu\ ed bui i essful .mil the bi and is now 
in ii. ii ional disti ibution. 

Bui tlii* case history illustrates jusl 
one of five majoi activities handled 1>\ 
Compton's marketing department, rhe 

1 5 men under Bill Nei in .d- n< ei n 

themselves with '!• sales analysis; 
1 2 1 field analysis, including industry 
Bales trends, effectiveness "I competi- 
tive programs and evaluation <>f theii 
own program; (3) brand Btrateg) de- 
velopment, in trim* of pricing, co-op 
programs, de^ elopmenl <>f produi i 
lines .ind features; I 1 1 development 
of sales programs, Buch as franchise 
plans, distribution channels, market 
development for individual markets; 
i 5 i sales promotion. 

The work of the marketing depart- 
ment actuall) guides directl) or indi- 
rectly ever) phase of an) account's ad- 
vertising strategy. Ii relates directl) 
in the buying of tv programing, net- 
work or Ideal, for example. 

\- Lewis I iit criii n. v.p. in charge "I 
l\ -radio and John Egan, executive pro- 
ducer, told sponsor: 

" \ couple nl j ears ago a i lient de- 
cided mi syndicated half-hour pro- 
graming for t\. We looked for prod- 
uct, and media searched out the time in 
several markets. W e picked an anthol- 
ogy. \fter a test period, although 
media continued to improve the time, 
we were not satisfied with the results. 

"We reviewed the marketing aim- 
ami decided to huv a program vvith 
an appeal -hinted more closel) to the 
selling objectives of our client. What 
we finallv bought was a Western-action 
film that would appeal locally, and 
give ii- a merchandisable personality 
as well. We believe the record -|><-.ik- 
for itself and that we can rightfully 
claim to have reached our objectives 
successfully ." 

While marketing functions as one 
of the main agenc) service depart- 
ments assigned to help the account ex- 
ecutive in shaping strategy, it- work 
actuall) precedes that of the other de- 
partments and lav- down guidelines 
for them. Once a campaign i- mi the 
air. marketing continue- to check to 
see whether the campaign, and the cli- 
ent aims are attuned and to make sure 
there are no stumbling blocks in di-- 
tribution. pricing and sales organiza- 
tion to prevent maximum advertising 
and sales elliciencv . ^ 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers who select \\ < A 
foi results! L957 promises 
exciting new programming to 
make W GN's polic) nl high 
qualit) at liivs cost even more 
attrai live to you. 



SPECIALIZED NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 

With 100% Negro programming per- 
• or.nel, KPRS if effectively directing 
the buying habiti of its vo»t, faithful 
audience. Your talei messoge wetlti 
neither time nor money in reaching 
the heart of it* "preferred" market. 
Buying time an KPRS if like buying the 
only radio station in a community of 
127,600 active prospects. 



1,000 W. 1590 KC. 

KPRS 



KANSAS CITY. MISSOURI 
far avai/obi/iries call Humboldt 3-3100 

Represented Nationally by- 
John i. Peersen C enemy 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 



87 



WITHOUT A "PEER 



M 



in the Rockford Area! 




IN THIS $ BILLION-PLUS 
SALES EMPIRE WREX-TV 
IS THE KING SALESMAN 

The Rockford TV Area — Illinois' 1 st market 
outside Chicago — is 400,195 families 
strong, with $2,357,080,000 income. It 
embraces rich farm counties whose cities 
house industrial giants like General Motors, 
Fairbanks-Morse, Parker Pen, Burgess Bat- 
tery, Sundstrand . . . and show sales indexes 
like Rockford's 158, Beloit's 151, Janes- 
ville's 153, DeKalb's 184, Freeport's 176, 
Dixon's 203. Sales total $1,706,962,000, 
average $4,265 per family — $447 above 
average. 

The most recent viewership survey again 
shows WREX-TV as the favorite, by better 
than 3 to 1 . It's favored by advertisers 
too . . . for its consistent results, at much 
lower cost per thousand. 

J. M. BAISCH, GENERAL MANAGER 
Represented by H. R. TELEVISION, Inc. 







■ 



Reps at work 




George Lindsay, television sales manager for Weed Television 
Corp., comments: "Spot tv is a better bu) todaj than ever before. 
Spot tv clients have been romanced, and in many cases won over 1»\ 
the low cost-per-1,000 and saturation plans. Yet, radio markets are 
shrinking, forcing agencies to buy more stations than in the past. In 
effect, vertical listening habits and 
shrinking markets have resulted in 
an ever-increasing radio cost-per- 
1,000. The NCS #2, by compari- 
son, reveals an ever-increasing tv 
market. The Weed tv stations are 
credited with an average of 24% 
more sets. In addition, tv hori- 
zontal viewing habits enable ad- 
vertisers to saturate a market with 
substantially fewer announce- 
ments. Recently the Leo Burnett 
Agency purchased spot tv at a 
cost-per-1,000 of 85^ for the Chicago division of the Kendall Co. 
Many other comparable tv buys have been made by agencies. No ad 
medium has ever been able to sell consumer goods as effectively. 
Newspapers present a visual displav of a product. Radio tells its 
story. But tv combines these two and adds demonstration, putting tv 
in the class of a sales medium rather than simply an ad medium." 



Bob Dore, Bob Dore Associates, New York, comments: "At 'deci- 
sion time" buyers are swamped with station presentations from rep 
salesmen who are justifiably anxious for adequate time to present 
ratings, market resources and other pertinent facts that buyers need 
for an intelligent selection. Media buyers must frequently listen to 

two or three hundred presenta- 
tions in a few da\ s. How much of 
it stays with the buyer? We don't 
know, but we do know that even 
buyers are human and can t re- 
tain thousands of facts thrown at 
them in a short period. Buyers 
are always ready to learn more 
about a market, particularly when 
some of the budget is being spent 
in the area and the sales are lag- 
ging. Stations are just as ready 
to present their story, especially 
when they've spent a lot of time and money putting a story together 
and know that their station should be on the list. But the time to 
get that story across is ever) day of the year between buys. Then 
when buvers call for availabilities they will have pretty definite 
thoughts about the stations to purchase. This is the fairest and most 
practical way for both bu\ers and reps to conduct their business." 




88 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 







WTAR-TV's own crew knows the ropes. 
That's the reason why the Station has 
earned an enviable reputation for its 
Local Programming. 

Real savvy, top-notch performers, able 
direction, have earned a fervent "Well 
Done" from advertisers; local, regional 
and national. All hands are standing by 
to hoist "sales" for you! 




(Based on Measured Contour Map by Jansky & Bailey) 

5 of Virginia's Busiest Cities are 
within WTAR-TV's Grade-A Signal. 



1. FORENOON WATCH . 8:45 A.M 

2. AFTERNOON WATCH 1: 10 - 1:30 P.M. 

3. FIRST DOG WATCH 4:30 - 6:00 P.M. 

4. SECOND DOG WATCH 6:30-6:35 P.M. 

5. SECOND DOG WATCH 6:40-6:45 P.M. 

6. FIRST WATCH 1 1:00-1 1:10 P.M. 

7. FIRST WATCH 11:15 P.M 



"Bob and Chauncey' 

Andy Roberts Show 
with Lee Brodie 
and Orchestra 

M-G-M Theatre" 
Jeff Dane, Host 

Laverne Watson 
"Your Esso Reporter' 

Joe Foulkes, 

Staff Meteorologist 

Joe Perkins 
"11th Hour News" 

"The Best 

of Hollywood" 

M-G-M Hits 



For detailed information and rates on these exceptionally 
high-rated, low-cost programs write WTAR-TV or your Petry man. 




gsgss 





' . 



S^ST^3 





CHANNEL 3, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

Business Office and Studio — 720 Boush Street, Norfolk, Va. 

Tel.: MAdison 5-6711 

REPRESENTATIVE Edward Petry & Company, Inc. 



SPONSOR 



11 MAI 1957 



89 



KANV is 
Shreveport's 

ONLY 




ALL 

NEGRO 

PROGRAM 

STATION! 

That's why KANV is 
THE station to use to 
reach this richer-than- 
average Negro market. 
Our experienced staff 
knows its audience and is 
ready to help with your 
sales problems at the 
local level. KANV rates 
are low and results are 
high! 

GET 
THE 
PROOF! 

It's yours for the asking. 

Write, call or wire the KANV 
Representative in your area — NOW! 




* 



1050 Ice - 250 Watts - DAYTIME 

the OHLY ALL NEGRO PROGRAM Station in 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 






Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 




Herminio Traviesas, BBDO vice presi- 
dent who has been in charge of the Lucky 
Strike radio and tv activities for the past 
seven \ears. has been appointed manager 
of the tv-radio department at the agency. 
Robert L. Foreman, who was recently 
named an executive vice president, will 
continue to supervise tv-radio activities 
along with his new responsibility as chair- 
man of the plans board. Traviesas joined BBDO in 1950. Before 
that be was with CBS for three years as network tv sales service 
manager; and with NBC for ten years as traffic manager, interna- 
tional division and salesman for international accounts of the 
radio recording division. At BBDO Traviesas has supervised Luck\ 
Strikes network shows which include: } our Hit Parade, Robert 
Montgomery Presents, Private Secretary and the Jack Benny Shoiv. 

James M. Gaines, vice president and 

general manager at WOAI and WOAI-TV, 

San Antonio, has been named president 

and general manager. Reorganization of 

the management of Southland Industries. 

owners and operators of WOAI and 

WOAI-TV, follows the death of Hugh A. 

L. Halff. New chairman of the board is 

Hugh Halff. Jr. The new president is an 

alumnus of the National Broadcasting Co. Gaines joined NBC in 

1941 in the station relations department and subsequently held 

many posts there including: assistant sales promotion director, 

sales promotion director, manager of Y\ RCA. manager of the 

o&o stations, and later vice president for the o&o's. He also served 

as vice president in charge of radio and tv for Y\ OR. New \ ork. 

Earlv in his career, Gaines was a Major Bowes representative. 

Wilson J. Main, vice president and direc- 
tor at Ruthraufi & Rvan. has been named 
director of marketing at the agency. Func- 
tion of the department will be to coordi- 
nate marketing, research and media. In 
announcing the appointment. F. Kenneth 
Beirn. R&R president, said. "This appoint- 
ment marks a greatly expanded marketing, 
research and media department for greater 
depth of service to our client in developing sound marketing and 
merchandising programs." Main has been with the agency since 
1935. In 194-1 be was elected a vice president and then in 1949 
he was made a member of the board of directors. He has been 
research director since 1942 and for the past several vears has been 
active on administrative management committees. I nder the new 
set-up Daniel M. Gordon will continue as v. p. and director of media. 





SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 




SPONSOR • 11 MAY 195*3 



91 



SPONSOR 




The light touch can backfire 

For many years it was a rare clienl who approved radio 
commercials with a lighl touch (although radio's top ad-lib 
personalities have always sold this way). But now the pen- 
dulum has swung. Today sponsors are throwing old preju- 
dices out the window and are looking for spoofs, comedy, 
parodies, skit- and novelties of every description to enhance 
their wares. 

This, we admit, is wholesome. The new commercials are 
a breath of fresh air and sometimes make better listening 
than the programing which surrounds them. But the dan- 
gers in the new trend loom as great as the opportunities. 

Nothing falls as flat as the attempt at humor which doesn't 
i ome off. And nothing can kill the current trend as fast as a 
few -dozen bad imitations of the successful light touch com- 
mercials. 

The light-touch trend deserves a long run in radio. Per- 
haps it will become a permanent fixture, joining such suc- 
cessful commercial forms as the melodic jingle and the par- 
ody of a hit song. But we shudder at the prospect of a rash 
of imitation Harry's and Bert's flooding the airwaves (there 
have already been a few inept efforts of this type on both 
tv and radio). 

The important thing for admen to realize about the suc- 
cessful light-touch commercials (see article this issue page 
37), is that they are not humorous for the sake of humor 
alone. Humor is merely the ear-opener. The real guts of 
these commercials is still straightforward sell. 

The bright young men and women who sit at the type- 
writers in your agency obviously are raring to prove that they 
can be as funny as the best. But it's as important to make 
a balanced appraisal of your commercial's personality today 
as it was before Harry and Bert Piel, Cho Cho Sen-Sen and 
the other delightful characters of today's light touch school 
were invented. 



4 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Yon can't blame sta- 
tions for putting their best foot forward during 
"ratings week." Everybody does it. But a way 
must be found to end this highly artificial 
situation. Dates for ratings should be secret. 



92 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Small fry: Playhouse 90 (CBS TV) 
is said to be considering a play on the 
early life of Liberace. Complete with 
toy piano and candelabra three inches 
high? 

Quote: Groucho Marx in TV Guide — 
"If you were the advertising man en- 
trusted with the spending of $2 or 
$3 million, would \ou try to elevate 
the public or would you try to find 
yourself a good commercial show? 
When the public wants to be elevated, 
it will do its own elevating." 

Great oaks: MBS has come up with 
some notes on the birth-place of some 
of its stations: \\ OR. New York, began 
in the rug department of a Newark 
department store; WBAX, Wilkes- 
Barre. Pa., originated in the bedroom 
of a private home; Philadelphia's WIP 
was born in the piano department at 
Gimbel's; KGDE, Fergus Falls. Minn., 
first broadcasted from a small drug- 
store; in the same state, Moorhead s 
KVOX started in a 12 x 15 foot base- 
ment cubicle of a hotel, adjacent to the 
mens room. 

Science-fiction: Working late one 
night at Cunningham & Walsh, Time- 
huver Jack Bray phoned out for cof- 
fee and doughnuts. He gave the ad- 
dress and asked that it be sent up to 
the Media Department. When it final- 
ly came, he noticed that directions on 
the check stated "c/o Meteor Dept." 
Maybe they mistook the timebuyer for 
a spacebuyer. 

Trend: Add titles of new adult West- 
erns: The Restless Gun. "Give that 
ornery cowpoke a Milt own!" 

Test pattern: Proof of a super sales- 
man, according to Jack Mulholland. 
NBC TV Spot sales manager in Chi- 
cago, is when he can sell a show with a 
0.4 rating. What is a 0.4 rating? It's 
when nobody's listening and four peo- 
ple hate you. 

Automation: From N. Y. Times — 
"Developers of electronic gadgets have 
prepared the groundwork that will in- 
troduce the age of automation into 
commercial broadcasting. The day 
when a station can present hours and 
hours of programs with no one even 
touching a switch or throwing a cue 
is in the foreseeable future." 
And the local personality uill answer 
to the name of Frankenstein. 



SPONSOR 



11 MAY 1957 ] 



e re moving more motor cars in motorize* 



*-r* 





\ 1 1 







WOO as of January 1, 1957* 

19% more than January 1, 1947 — 

hre automotive sales than Seattle, Fort Worth, Mem- 
(is, New Orleans or Columbust 

'ere are more people making more, driving more cars 
ad watching Channel 8 more than ever before. 

itten-Holloway Services -California Department of Motor Vehicles 
t ilet Management May 1956 Survey of Buying Power 



KFMB 

WRATHERALVAREZ BF 




Edward Petry & Co.. Inc. 



SAN DIEGO 

A m - 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

DETROIT 
BOSTON 
SAN FRANCISCO 
ATLANTA 

HOLLYWOOD 
DES MOINES 




TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 



r HM 



MS a 

* YCHK PO w Y 



■W 



.It 



IS MAY 1 • n . 
40« ■ copy • SIO ■ ymr 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



MORE AUDIENCE* THAN 

ANY STATION IN MINNEAPOLIS- 
ST. PAUL THAT'S WHAT 

WNBF-TV, BINGHAMTON, NY 

DELIVERS DAY AND NIGHT 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK-AT 

LOWER COST PER 1000. 

YOUR BLAIR-TV MAN HAS 



THE EVIDENCE FOR YOU. 




Also more oudience than any 
station in Baltimore, Buffalo, 
Houston and other major markets. 

Pulse, November 1956 
SRDS, March 10, 1957 
Television Magazine, Nov. 1956 



A TRKNOLE STATION 



WNBF-TV 

BINGHAMTON NEW YORK 

rSj Channel 12 
ABC-TV • NBC-TV 



TOO MANY 
COMMERCIALS 
ON RADIO? 

^I es, -.i\ buyei -. point- 
ing to multiple spotting. 
No. maintain sellers; 
even with prime-time 
squeeze radio compai ea 
well to the othei media 

Page 37 



Can Pat Weaver 
lick the system 
he built? 

Page 40 

Saturation 
radio hypoed 
this contest 

Page 43 



Timebuyer team 
in action 
for Texaco 

Page 48 



■operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications. Inc. / 46th i Market Sts.. Philadelphia 39. Pa. 
WFIL-AM . FM • TV. Philadelphia. Pa./WNBF-AM • FM • TV. Binghamton. NY. / WHGB-AM. Harrisburg. Pa. 
WFBG-AM • TV. Altoona. Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV. New Haven-Hartford. Conn. / wlbr-tv. Lebanon. Pa. 
National Sales Office. -IBS Lexington Avenue. New York 17. New Yc 



TENMESSEE 



MISS 



Announcing 

die Appointment of 

Harrington, Righter 
<Sl Parsons 

National Sales Representatives 

Effective June 1st 




BIRMINGHAM 

Alabama's Best in TV 

WABT is honored to be included with 
these distinguished TV stations: 



WAAM — Baltimore 
WBEN-TV— Buffalo 
WCDA-B-C— Albany 
WDAF-TV— Kansas City 
WFMY-TV— Greensboro 
WHAS-TV— Louisville 



WTMJ-TV— Milwaukee 
WRVA-TV— Richmond 
WSYR-TV— Syracuse 
WMTW-Mt. Washington 
WTPA— Harrisburg 
WTIC-TV— Hartford 



GA. 



WABT Channel 13 NBC 




FLORIDA 




This year's Fashion revival given so much impetus bj 1A Fait 
Lady i- reflected in 1 1 m i — lingerie promotion for DulVnt nylon. 
Qlustrations reveal a feminine dream world of soft pastels, and 
delicately express the theme, "The New Romanticism." Ad- 
vance orders promise tie-in- 1>\ stores across the 1 . S., giving 
nylon an extra boost in spring nn >n t li -. \d- run March through 
June in Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and The Sew York Times. 



Most people have no use for bad weather. Hut th>- Campbell's 
Soup people do. Thej use such weather to sell soup in some 
seasonal magazine ads. These spe< ial ads feature "mood' 1 photos 
of raw. rainy, miserable days the kind of weather, depth re. 
searchers say, tliat puts folk- in the mood foi some good, hot 
soup, lor added spice, weather shots are in black and white, 
make color photos of Campbell's Soup all the more inviting. 




Mrs. Sal Maglie i- one of several Brooklyn Dodge: wives who 
appear in a new series of commercials for Schaefer Beej on the 
Dodger telecasts. In warm and friemlh dialogue w ith off-camera 
announcer, each wife discusses some bobb) or interest she pur- 
sue- (Mrs. Maglie loves to cook Mexican food) for real enjoy- 
ment. In her own word- and in her own way, each also mentions 
her appreciation of Schaefer— "for real enjoyment, real beer." 



Another exciting new idea in home lighting 
Electric, of course. You can actually "i whole room 

with G-E Coloramic l>ul!> — ul>tl\ change it- whole color ami 
mood in the short time it take- !<• < bange bulbs. This four 

• BBD< > < I- -eland i- in itself a brand-new idea. It shows 
the same room lighted tour different ways with <• I - ' "ramie 
liulh- Dawn Pink, >k\ Blue, Sun Gold and Spi - I 



BATTEN, BARTON, DURSTINE & OSBORN, INC., ADVERTISING 



T - \ N T \ . fiO-TON 



IT • HOLI Y«OOI< 



SPONSOR 



18 m^ L957 



18 May 1957 • I ,,l. 1 1, \u. 20 



Jp» 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Is radio over-commercial? 

37 "Yes" saj buyers, multiple spotting weakens the sales punch. "No" reply 
sellers. Even with prime-time problem, radio compares well to other i lia 

Can Pat lick his own system? 

40 The architect oi big-money tv lias gone to low budget. This interview 
with Weaver puts limited network in perspective with tv world Tat built 

Saturation radio put the zip in this contest 

43 Englander may move market-by-market after hitting the jackpot in San 
Francisco with a treasure hunt promoting its springs and mattresses 

Top tv commercials as the artists see it 

46 36th annual Art Director's show chooses top tv commercials of the year. 
Criteria: do thej have that "forward look?" Top winners: Ford and Lincoln 

The timebuying team 

43 \ detailed picture of who does what on a spot account as a team at 
Cunningham & Walsh launches the "Tower of Power" campaign for Texaco 



FEATURES 

28 Wth and Madison 

57 New and Renew 

66 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
90 Reps at Work 
60 Sponsor Asks 
18 Sponsor Backstage 
86 Sponsor Hears 



9 Sponsor-Scope 
94 Sponsor Speaks 
62 Spot Buys 
94 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
92 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
58 Tv Results 
83 Washington Week 
24 Women's Week 



In Upcoming Issues 

A new all-media yardstick 

In the works is a new research yardstick which compares printed and 
air media impact. The system has been used in eight markets thus far 

Preview of nighttime network tv 

Soon to be published, the fall nighttime network tv schedule with 
I estimati comparisons with the season past 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP— Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 

Advertising Staff 

Jane E. Perry 

George Becker 

Ginger Dixon 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 

Administrative Staff 

M. Therese McHugh 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



ES3 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
161 E. Crand Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign $11. Sin- 
gle copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Congratulations to the 



KWKH WINNERS! 



Here arc the statistical w izards and speed demons 
who were the first to name the three radio stations 
in America which dominate their markets as com- 
pletely as K\\ Kll dominates Shreveport and its 
entire .MIS No. 2 area. Our KWKH checks totaling 
.$1500 have already been mailed to them. 






MR. ROBERT GRAF 

Ted Bales & Company 

New York 



MISS CAROLYN V. POSA 

MR. ED. PAPAZIAN 

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn 

New York 



MR. MARVIN D. BERNS 

J. Walter Thompson Company 

Chicago 



And what ewe tlir facts about k\\ K H*> impact and domi- 
nance? K\\ Kll has ">()' ' greater circulation than it» nearest 
competitor in the home county — 293' ! greater circulation 
than its nearest Shreveporl competitor throughout it- NCS 

No. 2 area — and tliir- despite the fact that there arc eight 
radio stations in Shreveport, rather than ju-t lour or live! 

[mpressive as these figures arc the) arc onlj part ol the 
reasons why practically everybody chooses KWKH in the 
Shreveport area — advertisers as well as listeners! \-k your 
Branham man for all the facts! 



KWKH 



A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



ARKANSAS 



The Branham Co. 
Representatives 



Henry Clay Fred Watkins 

Genera/ Manager Commercial Monoger 




RALPH RENlO| 

"Renick 
Reporting 

6:30 PM 



WT|J!s Local, Award-Winning Ne\ 

From South Floric 




Basic Affiliate 



THROUGHOUT THE DAY . . . THROUGHOl 

THE WEEK WTVJ's AWARD-WINNING 

NEWS PROGRAMS CONSISTENTLY OUT-R, 

THE COMPETITIVE SHOWS ... IN MANY O 

BY 4 ... 5 AND 6 TO 1 






FLORIDA'S FIRST TELEVISION 



ARB March: WTVJ again captures 82.6% of ALL Sou 




RTNDA "Gold Trophy 
Award For Outstanding TV 
News Operation in the Na- 
tion." 1952 



hows Obtain Top Ratings 
Hewers 



WTVJ TAKES GREAT PRIDE IN THE 

NATIONAL RECOGNITION RECEIVED BY ITS 

i MAN NEWS DEPARTMENT. .. AN INDICATION 

THAT THE STATION IS SERVING ITS 

COMMUNITY IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST 




RTNDA "Gold Trophy 
Award For Outstanding TV 
News Operation in the Na- 
tion." 1953 



• 



• HEADLINERS Award For 
Outstanding Local News". 
1956 



Represented Nationally by 
iters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



fc^t^*********** 4 * 4 



STATION 



dam** 1 



MIAM 



Ibrida Television Quarter-hour Rating "FIRSTS" 



television audience leadership 
in baltimore's 3-station market 




WMAR-TV 

measured 

coverage 



March Nielsen reports 
that WMAR-TV garners 



share 
of 



48.3V- 



total 
audience 



with all these 
quarter-hour Monies in 1 week 

NSIarea 28,510,300 

Beyond NSI area . 16,222,500 
Total V 4 hr. homes 44,732,800 

* 7 A.M. -Midnight, Sun. thru Sot. 




SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, MD. 

TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE 
COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 
presented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

New York, Detroit, St. Louis, San Francisco, 
Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



The news: Henry Jaffe, union and show business lawyer- 
iiu ned-tv-producer, was honored along with AFTRA's late executive 
secretary, George Heller, at AFTRA's 20th anniversary dinner 13 
May. One of the toughest union negotiators in show business, Jaffe 
was AFTRA's national and New York counsel for almost 20 years. 

The newsmaker: Henry Jaffe, one of the founders of 
AFTRA, would have left the union a year before he did (he resigned 
as national counsel this year) if the death of George Heller hadn't 
kept him at the bargaining table for one more battle. Among his 
final accomplishments were the extension of AFTRA's pension and 
welfare plan to radio and the tripling of transcription scales. 

After fighting for years over pay levels that often involved in- 
creases of a few dollars a week, Jaffe is now traveling in the multi- 
million dollar atmosphere of network tv show costs. Not that strato- 
spheric show business budgets are 
a novelty to him. Being attorney 
to such personalities as Dinah 
Shore, Grace Kelly and Leland 
Hayward has given him more than 
a speaking knowledge of show 
business costs. However, his first 
venture as an independent produc- 
er on his own involves a record 
talent and production nut for a 
weekly network tv show. This is 
the hour-long Chevy Show, which 
will cost Chevrolet, bv sponsor's 
estimate, about $150,000 per week, 
exclusive of time, and involves a total annual cost to the sponsor of 
between $11 and $12 million. 

Jaffe is unruffled by these figures, though, obviously, not unhappy 
about it since Dinah Shore, whom he represents as lawver and mana- 
ger, will appear in about half of the 52 shows. While not unmindful 
of the pay his clients receive. Jaffe puts the dollar sign second to the 
nature of the role the star gets and its impact on the public. "Id be 
ashamed to tell you what Dinah got on her first hour show for Chev- 
rolet," he said. "But I realized what it would mean to her if it were 
successful." Jaffe also realizes how difficult it is to set an objective 
figure on a star's price. "How can } ou say what a star is really 
worth to a tv sponsor unless you know what the sales impact is? 
I've been told Jack Benny pulled Jell-0 out of the doldrums. What 
should he have gotten? Maybe a share of the company."" 

Besides the Chevy Sfww, Henrv Jaffe Enterprises, set up after 
he broke up with his former law 7 partners (including his brother, 
Saul), is pitching three other shows for the 1957-58 season and is 
already planning six for the 1958-59 season. Among those he's cur- 
rently working on is a series of 20 one-hour dramatic-musical fairy 
tales featuring Shirley Temple as hostess-narrator. ^ 




Henry Jaffe 



SPONSOR 



18 MAY 1957 



^^±3 



in 



i-b- 1 







I 



THHOUQHOUT NEW ENGLAND 



MORE PEOPLE 



THAN ANY OTHER 



I STATION 




mmmmmmmm 



Operated by Yankee Network Division, RKO Teleradio Pictures, Inc 

\ i i i i | '-r — T"^ 











\ 





d- 4. 



WNHC-TV DOMINATES AGAIN! 

In a 14-county area, covering 896,000 
TV homes, sign on to sign off, seven days a 
week, WNHC-TV delivers average audiences : 
a 210% greater than top New York City station ! 
▲ 244% greater than Hartford ! ! 
a 174'A') greater than New Britain!!! 

WNHC-TV nearly triples monthly coverage 

of next Connecticut station, delivering all 

of Connecticut plus entire Springfield- 

Holyoke market area. Katz has 

proof: ARB, Nov. 1956; Nielsen 

NCS #2, 1956. 




WNHC-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 

Channel 8 

ABC-TV* CBS-TV 
Represented by KATZ 



operated by : Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 4-6th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton. N. Y. / WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. 
WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. / wlbr-tv, Lebanon, Pa. 
National Sales Office, 4-85 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 

...ESPECIALLY IN HARTFORD! 



sponsor o L8 m\v 195' 









\ft>\t tignificant tv nrul tmiio 

news of the urrk with inlerjiretntion 
in depth for limy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



18 MAY When does a buyer stop sticking pins In ;i map and reach the "cutoff* 1 point? 

•roMson publications mo. I his week that was the important question for reps ami station men .1- the fill scramble 

for business was at its height. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE finds that the method f<>r determining a maximum t\ network 
hookup (or basic spot campaign) lias pretrj nearl) evolved in!" i fixed formula. 
Oriirinallv developed by one of the giant sponsors, it oom has gained wide > 

and imitation. Here's how it works: 

1) Every county delivered by the basic station is credited to thai Station. 

2) Basic optional stations arc given credit for all counties not duplicated !>\ B 
hasic station, plus delivery of set circulation in marginal counties. 

3) To arrive at the cutoff point, the aeenrv then works out the average COSt'per- 
1000 homes for all the basic optional stations. That average becomes the auto. 
matic yardstick for addiner other stations or omitting them. 

An occasional exception is a station that delivers 50.000 undupliratcd tv homes in a 
missing and required countv. 

Note that while the foregoing concept is phrased in network terminolocv. it is equal- 
ly applicable to spot with a slight change in language. 

So now spot — which has had to await its turn in the automotive game — at 
last is at bat. Pontiae is the first to feed it a home-run hall. 

Through MacManus. John & Adams. Pontiae will be spending over S.Vmillion 
for air media durins the 19f57-season. This is the breakdown: 

• Six specials on NBC TV. totalling around S2.250.000 in time and talent. 

• The Notre Dame games on MBS C14 or 15 weeks). 

• Simulcasting of two of the final professional football games. 

• A 13-week schedule of saturation spot radio for the fall and winter month*. 

• A likelv repetition of this schedule in the spring. 

With the spring campaign included, the spot expenditure will run well over 
the §2-million mark. 

General Motors' pronounced swing toward tv as a favorite medium for its divi- 
sions could in a large measure he due to the fact that it has an enthusiastic rooter 
near the head of the GM table. 

He's William F. Hufstader, whose corporate title is v.p. in charge of district staff. 
His office is right next door to Harlow W. Curtice's. And within the industry, he's cen- 
erally credited as being one of the really sharp marketing strategists. 

Chevrolet's ears are open for a network radio pitch. 

Mutual has already had its say to Camphell-Ewald. offerinz a package similar to 
the one Ford has purchased on CBS: seven davs of news, music, personality and variety 
shows. 

Meanwhile Campbell-Ewald didn't let the Ford deal pas? without a burnup at CBS 
Radio. Whv. the agencv wanted to know, wasn't the ?5.5-million deal also offered to Chev- 
rolet. when for three years it has shown enough confidence in the medium to run as many 
as 12 five-minute periods a week? 

Chrysler through it all remains a question mark. Its big tv show? are lined up. 
to be sure. But what about radio? The trade onlv can guess at this point — but it's a _ 
guess — that Chrvsler will be in the network radio bac too. 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



Ernest A. Jones, president of MacManus, John & Adams, appears to have 
modified his impressions of tv as a medium for selling autos. 

About 18 months ago, Jones got quite a play in the papers because of his bearish views 
on tv. But this week he indicated to SPONSOR-SCOPE that he is becoming a convert in 
part, at least. 

He attributes this to improvements within the tv industry, rather than any changed 
understanding of the medium by the auto people. 

The improvements, as Jones sees them, are: 

• A better effort to fit the medium into the needs, selling pattern, and marketing 
problems of a particular industry. 

• Broader flexibility in show and time buying — in other words, the medium is more 
open to propositions from advertisers with specific promotional objectives. 

Jones feels that one of the greatest "logistic" advances made by networks was the in- 
troduction this season of a system whereby advertising can buy "specials" more free- 
ly and flexibly than before — due to the right of the networks to preempt two periods from 
regular advertisers during the year. 

(For more of Detroit's share in coming season's air media picture, see 4 May SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE, page 9.) 

Bill Maillefert. Petry's radio chief, figures that next week he will be able to 
tell whether his plan for getting stations to reduce nighttime rates is headed for 
success or is a dead duck. 

On the thesis that night radio can be sold if "priced practically," Maillefert has asked 
the 20 Petry radio stations to make the nighttime rate 50% of the daytime tab. The tally 
should be available in a few days. 

Maillefert's next move (should the vote be significantly favorable) : Suggest to SRA 
members that they start the ball rolling with their own stations. 

It may cause a stir, but WINN, Louisville, has introduced an agency compensa- 
tion policy that pays up to 20%. 

The scale is 15% on the first $1,000 each month; 17 1 /2% on everything from $1,000 to 
$2,000; and 20% on everything above $2,000. 

Pulse intends to disclose stations that use special promotional devices to hypo 
their showing during rating weeks. 

The method : When informed of such "special activities," Pulse will ask the stations 
to describe the giveaway (or whatever it was) and publish the replies in the audi- 
ence report. 

Meet network tv's latest pressure group: 

It's composed of seasonal advertisers — most of them specializing in the gift trade — 
and the object of their agitation is a better break in discounts. 
The seasonal fellows contend that: 

• The present discount structure in tv is really a hangover from radio — a system orig- 
inally designed for such big advertisers as P&G and General Foods. 

• Equitable discount provisions should be made for year-in-and-year-out custom- 
ers who, because of the nature of their business, can use tv only at certain intervals during 
the year. 

Tv sponsors can get an idea of the dimensions of the commercial producing 
field via the seven-year progress of a representative firm — Eliot, Unger & Eliot. 

It started with a camera, now has an investment of $600,000 in equipment. It gets be- 
tween $2,500 and $15,000 per commercial. Once located in an apartment house, it now occu- 
pies three buildings and grosses $2.5 million a year. 

10 SPONSOR • 18 MAT 1957 




* SPONSOR-SCOPE < "firmed . . . 

SI'0\<nl! ^COI'K this week checked with each of tin- radio network! t" find onl wli.n 
effeel the npenrge in network bnya hum had on relationahipi with affiliate - 

Here's a Mim-up of what the networks say: 

ABC i Defections, which for a while were like a chain reaction and in man) cases 
involved change of ownership, have halted completely, The gap* have been filled pretri well 
CBS: No significant defections; hence no problem. 

MBS: Drop-OUtB in Milwaukee. K.C., St. Joseph, and other places have heeri replaced 

Manv stations which preferred independence now are inquiring about Mutual'- new con 
tract and programing service. 

NBC: Has same market lineup as prior to pullout of Westinghouse stations; aba 
again set in Buffalo and Allentown. 

Over-all conviction expressed hy the networks: Station- now are tendin; 
work radio in a hetter light — especially in view of the high costs of trying to program 
everything locally. 

U.S. Steel's Christmas radio promotion, Operation Snowflakr. is going net- 
work. 

BBDO this week placed orders with ABC and CBS Radio for time and talent to be 
used for two weeks prior to the holiday. The expenditure all told will add up to 
$50,000. 

The blueprint to date looks like this: 

ABC: Don McNeill, Monday through Friday; My True Story, Monday, Wednesday. 
Friday. 

CBS: During the weekend (for women who work on other days) Galen Drake. Robert 
Q. Lewis, and Our Miss Brooks. 

Estimated impact: 57 million family impressions, with each family reached 4.8 times. 

Operation Snowflake used spot radio in the two previous years. 

Stations that have watched the upbeat in network radio with terror and envy 
can take heart. 

An agencv executive who instigated much of the network business this week told SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE that local stations are beginning to counter with sales and programing 
ideas of their own. 

"Instead of accusing the networks of swiping their spot business," he feels, "a num- 
ber of stations are cultivating new types of accounts in our shop with imaginative 
and different gimmicks." 

His postscript: "I don't see why more stations can't themselves produce concepts like 
'Imagery Transfer' and dream up new ways of buying and using radio." 

CBS Radio continues to maintain a steady new-business rhythm. 

The past week's take includes: 

• General Mills: Six five-minute spots a week on Impact; §6,600 weekly. 

• Toni: 10 seven-and-a-half minute units a week: 120,000 weekly. 

• Good Housekeeping Magazine: 10 seven-and-a-half minute units a week: $20,000 
weekly. 

Additionally. Florida Citrus. Seeman Bros.. Sara I^e Cakes and American Home 
Foods bought into the Arthur Godfrey show. 

Revlon continues to mix up its choice of programing types. 

Within the space of a week it's bought Walter Winchell's crime show i ARC TV i and 
three June segments of the Steve Allen variety show i NRC TV). 

National spot tv perked up handsomely among the bigger New York agencies 
last week with action from P&G (Tide) through Compton; McKessen-Robhins 'Tar- 
tan) via DFS; Welch Grape Juice (R. K. Manor! >. 

SPONSOR • 18 may 1957 11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



P&G will lii in up its tv plans in a few days, but this year there is going to be 
a hangover. Here are the events behind it: 

1) Daytime network tv is in pretty healthy shape these days. 

2) That takes any potential panic or extraordinary concessions out of the rate situation. 

3) But by this token, daytime tv is too high-priced for some of P&G's lesser 
brands. 

It's too late to do much about that now, but that doesn't bury the problem for the 
future. 

People close to the account say that P&G's main block in failing to grapple successfully 
with this quandary is a psychological one: It's still dreaming of the phenomenal big- 
circulation-low-cost days of radio when a new brand with a small expenditure could take 
off like a skyrocket. 

The media world has changed (a serial which cost $700,000 a year in radio would come 
to around $3.5 million a year on tv) but P&G's media experts still nurture the hope that 
the networks will rescue them with a more economic rate plan. 

ABC TV this year slashed daytime to a third the nighttime rate. But where P&G sus- 
pects it missed an opportunity is in not getting to NBC TV with a long-range plan 
before that network started on its daytime upsurge. 



P&G will use 5 hours a week on NBC TV and 6^4 hours a week on CBS TV 
this fall. 

In net billings the combination will run between $17-18 million. 

The earned discounts on CBS TV put P&G's daytime rate at 37^4% of the 
nighttime gross rate, while the various discounts on NBC TV will reduce the cost on that 
network to a third of the nighttime gross rate. 

But in terms of base rates, P&G still is buying daytime facilities at 50% of the night- 
time rate. 

Johns-Manville, which last sponsored Meet the Press, will be out of the air me- 
dia picture for several months. 

There's been a change in management, and the newcomers want to take a breather to 
determine both marketing and media direction. JWT is the agency. 



The tempo of network tv buying for fall picked up rapidly this week. 

the following to vour chart: 



Add 



ADVERTISER 


AGENCY 


SHOW 


NETWORK & TIME 


PROGRAM COST 


Alcoa 


F&S&R 


5-Star Theatre 


NBC M 9:30 


$40,000 


Goodyear 


Y&R 


5-Star Theatre 


NBC M 9:30 


$40,000 


Pillsbury 


Burnett 


The Big Record 


CBS W 8 


$50,000 


Oldsmobile 


Brother 


The Big Record 


CBS W 8 


$100,000 


Kellogg 


Burnett 


The Big Record 


CBS W 8:30 


$50,000 


U. S. Rubber 


Richards 


Navy Log 


ABC Th 10 


$32,000 


Buick 


Kudner 


Patrice Munsel 


ABC Th 8:30 


$45,000 


Lorillard 


L&N 


Court Last Resort 


NBC F 8 


$28,000 


Pall Mall 


SSCB 


Manhunt 


NBC F 9 


$31,000 


Quaker Oats 


WBT 


Jane Wyman 


NBC Sa. 10 


$33,000 



Other developments: General Foods, having dropped West Point, will sponsor Danny 
Thomas by itself on CBS TV Monday 9-9:30. Lever is looking for a show on CBS Tuesday 
8:30, with JWT as the agency of record. The ABC Wednesday 8:30-9 niche will be occu- 
pied by a Bristol-Myers program. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; New 
and Renew, page 57; Spot Buys, page 62; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 66; Washington 
Week, page 83; sponsor Hears, page 86; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 92. 



12 



SPONSOR • 18 MAT 1957 




Toss 'em! These may be all right for somebody who 

doesn't know what WDGY has done to Twin Cities radio 



- LATEST (1957) NIELSEN - 

I — I 



515.2 
90.7 

254.3 
208.3 



WDQ V has rock* U <l up! 

i \i i id-.- (Station A : 

In Marco L956 . .,.,..,,. 

t \i i in-- (Station A : 

In March l!»..i [ WDGY: 

Nsi Area Average audience, 

\.m.-6 p.m., Monday-Saturday) 



• • • 

WDGY first NSI Area- 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 
M -, day-Saturday 



When L957 figures are available (and thej an i it stands I 
they are more significant thai L956 "history" esp cially whei 
data show things as of > 

The Nielsen "big-change" (shown left) is one instance. Another np- 
to-date fact: WDGY is first all day per latesi Tr< ither: 

WDGY is first every afternoon per latesi Boop • . . . and ]><t 
Pulse. In fact, Pulse gives WTJGY an average rating 
7 |p.m.. Mon.-Fri.). 

In every recenl report, WDG^ has a big first place audii 

Talk to Blair, or WDGY General STEVE LABUXSKI. 



WDGY 



The Storz Stati 



MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 



TODD STORZ, 

President 



] 



WDGY 

Minneapolis-St. Paul 



WHB 

Kansas City 



WQAM 

Miami 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 



KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



13 




o 

3 



Gef on the ball 
...in San Antonio 



The going is rough in San 
Antonio and South Texas with- 
out KONO, the No. ONE station 
that 88 national advertisers buy 
year after year. 
KONO Radio sells best in this 
51 -county market because of 
the powerful 

49% 

PENETRATION 

in San Antonio's Home County 
(N. C. S. #2) 

Want more information? Call 
your H-R or CLARKE BROWN 
man. 



860 kc 5000 watts 

ca :f -cra 

SAN ANTONIO RadlO 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Anita Wasserman, Lawrence C. Gumbinner Agency, New York, 
timebuyer for Filter Tip Tareyton, says: "1 indulged in a lo\el\ 
daydream today — 'If all I had to do was buy time . . . ah!" Then 
I took a look at the mountains of papers in various folders and I 
snapped back to realit\ . Contracts that weren't right — confirmations 
that varied from orders, with spot 
costs that differed from original 
quotes, etc., etc. And, once the 
buying is over, you're engulfed by 
hundreds of pieces of paper that 
verify and bind up tight the cam- 
paign under way. If you're a 
good swimmer and have stamina, 
you can get through these rough 
seas and reach the shore — a clean 
desk. Then you plunge in again 
on a new tide. So, this is an S-O-S 
for avails that have all informa- 
tions on them — including ratings; packages when asked for: combi- 
nation rates earned if you have a multi-product account: correct 
adjacencies; spot costs; and start and end dates easily visible. We 
also need prompt notification by the station of missed spots — why 
missed — and make-goods or credits for same. Enough! Fewer pa- 
pers, clearer and more information — then we can all swim ea-il\ . 



Val Ritter, Cunningham & Walsh, New York, buyer for Folger's 
Coffee, comments: "The timebuyer who wants to be can be more 
than a numbers juggler and become creative b) looking for a little 
extra in his buys. He can view the commercial and get a better 
feeling for the campaign. He can attend meetings where the discus- 
sion is on the more creative as- 
pects and come in contact with the 
copywriter, production men and 
account executives. The feeling 
for the whole rather than his part 
alone can enable him to apply 
himself to his job with more assur- 
ance. If he knows the commer- 
cial, he can place it in an atmos- 
phere more conducive to viewer 
interest. An abrupt change in 
commercial mood from the mood 
of the preceding program could be 
disturbing to the viewer. It would be advantageous to place his 
spots next to shows whose commercials can be related to his product. 
For instance, a beverage commercial slotted next to program spon- 
sored by a food advertiser. Naturally, these do not replace the basic 
considerations of ratings, coverage and audience, but they suggest 
that a creative approach is important to the buying function today. 




I ! 



SPONSOR 



18 ma\ 1957 



PIN POINT POWER 
GETS BEST RESULTS 

Radio Station W-l-T-H "pin point power" is tailor-made to 
blanket Baltimore's 15-mile radius at low, low rates — 
with no waste coverage. W-l-T-H reaches 74% of all 
Baltimore homes every week — delivers more listeners per 
dollar than any competitor. That's why we have twice as 
many advertisers as any competitor. That's why we're sure 
to provide a "steady stream" of sales results for you, too. 

"Cumulative Pulse Audience Survey 



h«M» 




Tom Tinsley 
President 

R. C. Embry 
Vice Pres. 



c o 



FIDE 



C E 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington. 
Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta. 



SPONSOR • 1!'. \i \\ 1957 



1". 




,iOr of the Am 
ican Research Bureau and eminent authority on 
program ratings. He is seen here as he selects a Mij 
west market for special review . . . one of the huj 
dreds of markets in which ZIV shows consistent 
rate high. 

In the photo at the left, ARB Tabulation Director, Kenneth 
Aurich, is supervising distribution of ARB's national diari* 
In these diaries TV viewers record the facts behind the Al. 
" ": on these ■*»«•* 



ZIVs 



NOW READY 
TO MAKE 
RATING 
HISTORY! 



7 



am au-nbw 

"The NEW Adventures of 

Martin Kane 

starring Academy Award Winner 

William Gargan a 



MYSTERY-ADVENTURE SERIES 




Get Martin Kane in y 
market and you get T: 
most firmly establish 
mystery -adventure ho 
Wire or phone immedial] 
for a look at a truly gripp| 
audition and a compreh 
sive sales plan. 



1ME IN CITY AFTER CITY! 



I V4 1 i. ft l 




i 



I Love Lucy. Dragnet. 
se90. What's My line 
ny others ARB. Mar 



BEATS: Groucho Marx, Bob 
Hope, Perry Como, Dragnet, 
and many others ARB. Mar 
1957 



starring BRODERICK CRAWFORD 



trol" "SCIENCE FICTION 

THEATRE" 



IN ROCHESTER 



IN SEATTLE-TACOMA 



40.2 37.6 



BEATS: I Love Lucy, $64,000 
Question. Groucho Marx. Play 
house 90 and many others 
AR8. Feb 57 



BEATS: Ed Sullivan. I Love 
Lucy. $64,000 Question. 
Groucho Marx and many 
others ARB. Feb. '57. 



IN PITTSBURGH 



IN SAN FRANCISCO 



38.0 23.9 



BEATS: Playhouse 90, Wyatt 
Carp. Arthur Godlrey, What's 
My Line and many others 
ARB, Jan. '57. 



BEATS Arthur Godi- 
Video Theati' 

Sid Caevar and many others 
ARB. Jan '57 



N 0LUMBIA, S. C. 



2.2 



B Ed Sullivan. I Love 
164.000 Question. Play 
■ 90 and many others 
liar '57 



IN BALTIMORE 



25.1 



BEATS: Dragnet. Phil Silvers. 
George Gobel. Sid Caesar and 
many others ARB, Mar '57 



IN SAN FRANCISCO 



IN CEDAR RAPIDS 
WATERLOO 



IN PORTLAND 



IN SEATTLE-TACOMA 



31.2 56.5 



BEATS: Playhouse 90. Drag 
net, Arthur Godfrey. Phil Sil 
vers and many others AR8. 
Jan '57. 



49.8 22.1 



BEATS: Ed Sullivan. I Love 
Lucy. $64,000 Question. Per 
ry Como. and many others 
ARB. Feb '57 



BEATS: Perry Como. Bob 
Hope. Playhouse 90. Disney 
land and many others ARB. 
Nov '56 



BEATS: Arthur Godfrey. Play 
house 90. Phil Silvers, lux 
Video Theatre and many 
others ARB, Jan '57 




IMifflfflMli 



starring BARRY SULLIVAN 



e CISCO K 

ring DUNCAN RENALOO and LEO CARRI 



IN BALTIMORE 



IN JACKSON, MISS. 



IN BALTIMORE 



IN SACRAMENTO 



Groucho Marx. Perry 
Arthur Godfrey. Drag 
many others ARB. 



30.7 40.7 



25.4 25.2 



BEATS: Ed Sullivan. Groucho 
Marx. Jack Benny. Playhouse 
90 and many others ARB. 
Feb '57. 



BEATS: Ed Sullivan, Groucho 
Marx. Perry Como. Playhouse 
90. and many others ARB. 
Oct. '56. 



BEATS: Groucho Marx. Perry 
Como. Jack Benny. Climax 
and many others PULSE. Dec 
1956 



BEATS: George Gobel. Lux 
Video Theatre. Sid Caesar. 
Ernie Ford, and many others. 
ARB. Feb '57 



BEATS: Arthur Godt' . 
house 90. Phil Silvers. George 
Gobel and many others ARB 
Feb '57 



LAS VEGAS 



3.9 

$64,000 Question, 
i Marx. Perry Como, 
md and many others 
•56. 



IN SAN ANTONIO 

27.0 



BEATS: George Gobel. Steve 
Allen. This Is Your Life. Danny 
Thomas and many others 
PULSE. Nov '56 



IN BIRMINGHAM IN SAN ANTONIO 

35.8 30.2 



IN COLUMBIA. S. C. 



IN MOBILE 



38.9 37.8 



BEATS: Groucho Marx. Drag 
net. Climax, Jack Benny and 
many others PULSE, Dec. '56 



BEATS: Dragnet. Arthur God 
frey. Steve Allen. This Is Your 
Life, and many others PULSE. 
Nov '56 



BEATS: Ed Sullivan I Love 
Lucy. $64,000 Question. Jack 
Benny and many othe r s ARB 



BEATS ■■ .'" Groucho 

■ 



ot just one survey, not just one month, but 
Imost always! That's how often you find 
iv shows at the very top of the rating lists. 
) if you want the CONSISTENTLY BIG 
UDIENCE of a CONSISTENTLY HIGH-RATED 
HOW, join the big happy family of Ziv 
low sponsors. 



FROM WE TOP MW 
fill syMP/CAT/ON . • • 

IH C0A/T/fV0/fV6 

mm mm** 




! 



TWO HITS 

and NEVER 

A MISS 







popular music stations 

BAKERSFIELD\ 

and CALIFORNIA 

LANCASTER / 



KBIS 

SOUTHERN _- AluM# . 

SAN JOAQUIN TRADING 

VALLEY AREAS - 



KBVM 

ANTELOPE 
VALLEY 



. POPULATION- 
RETAIL SALES 



- 91,000 

• {101,000,000 



COMBINED 2 ) romiAtiON... 538,000 
MARKETS TOTALI mtaii sales .. $682,283,000 



• • • 

■UY »OTH STATIONS 
KIIS. .«J XI VM 
FO» COMIINCD HATES 
LESS 10* 






L8 



by Joe Csida 



n 



sor 




■~j+ ■% «-3 



Look over your shoulder back to 1946 

The Institute for Education by Radio-Tele- 
vision of Ohio State University in Columbus did 
me the honor this year of asking me to make the 
opening address at the Institute on Wednesday 
evening. May 8. By the time this sees print, 
the speech will have been made, unless some- 
thing unforeseen and fatal happens to me be- 
tween the moment I write this piece (Monday, 
May 6 I and Institute time. 

The theme of this year's Ohio State session is "This Is Broadcast- 
ing, 1957! . and I have been asked to open the proceedings with 
a 30-minute discourse on "What Happened to Broadcasting, 1946- 
1956." I have worked rather hard to prepare a paper, which I 
hope will have some interest and value for my listeners. I have 
not only rummaged around in my memory hour upon long hour, 
reviewing my own personal experiences and knowledge of the 
past decade, but I've also done a substantial amount of research. 
I have been so fascinated with this review that I have the feeling 
you might find this 10-year look over your shoulder worth reading. 

Congressional investigations brewing in 1945 

Some things haven't changed at all. For example, just before 
the decade dawned, in the summer of 1945 Representative Emanuel 
Celler. Democrat from New York, was demanding that the Federal 
Communications Commission crack down on broadcasting. Radio 
programs, said the Congressman, featured too much boogie woogie, 
and besides thev were too corny. And this very week the honorable 
Mr. Celler released an as yet unendorsed report of his House Anti- 
Trust Subcommittee objecting to a number of network practices 
like '"must buy" stations, option time, etc. and warning of legisla- 
tion to correct same. Congressman Celler continues, too. to interest 
himself in the nation's popular music picture, since his report details 
the many unfair advantages he believes BMI to have over ASCAP. 

But bv and large the past 10 years saw more drastic change, more 
spectacular development in the broadcasting industry than has 
possibly been seen in any other American industry in a like period. 
In February of 1946. to illustrate, General Mills allocated close to 
$5 million to radio. This represented slightly more than one half 
of the total General Mills advertising budget. But less than five 
vears later in July of 1950 the Association of National Advertisers 
launched a fierce and successful drive to force network radio to cut 
its nighttime rates. Led by the Columbia Broadcasting System. 
the networks soon slashed their nighttime rates until they were 
virtuallv on a par with daytime. 

An even at the reduced rates the last half of the decade saw radio 
(lc\ ising new small segment, low cost sales concepts and selling 
plans. Records and transcriptions ceased to be a dirty word around 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




OF THE HOUSE! 



Today in the nation's Capital, Nielsen* proves most radios are tuned to WRC. 

Take the early morning for example, from 6 to 9 am, Monday through Friday. 
W RC's Al Ross is far and away the most popular man in this time period 
with Washington radio listeners. His "Timekeeper" show wins a 10 share of 
the total station audience, 63' < greater than the second station's. 

A.nd for most of the day and night, Nielsen now tells the same kind of story 
ibout WRCs audience advantage. For the total week WRC wins an average 
share-of-audience, 32' [ greater than the second station. 

tn Washington's 17- radio-station market, such an overwhelming vote of con- 
fidence carries over in force to WRC-advertised products. Let Al Ross on WRC 
Radio speak for you in the nation's Capital . . . just as he does for 64 national 
md local advertisers. 




'NSl Report-Washington, D.C, Area-January 1957 WASHINGTON. DC. 



WRC -980 



SOLD BY 



sllll » \l I ••» 



Sponsor backstage continued . 



NORl audience 
in lansing 

20 to \ P0^ er 



5000 



HVltt 



V(M« 



-W\ar. '57 Hooper 
»B Lansing Shows 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



7 -oo a.m.— 

\l noon 
\l noon— 
6.00 p-«n- 



yyilS Station B 

58.9 I «- 6 



54.6 



32.7 



IAMS1HG 




W ore listeners than 

a \\ other stations 

heard in 
Lansing combined 

* )a n. thru Mar. average 
C. E. Hooper, Inc. 






Represented Nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 



the radio networks, due to the willingness of the American Broad- 
casting Company to carry a transcribed show sponsored by Philco 
and starring Bing Crosby. The deal did specify that if the ratings 
of the show fell under a certain figure, der Bingle would agree to do 
the balance of the shows live. But the ratings held up, and in 
February of 1949 NBC discarded its rule against playing transcrip- 
tions on the network. 

This last 10-year span also saw the CBS talent raids against once 
all-powerful NBC. Abetted by some brilliant tax lawyers William 
Paley dangled multi-million dollar capital gains deals in front of 
some of General Sarnoff's finest audience-getters, and in reasonably 
rapid succession lured Jack Benny, Edgar Bergen, Red Skelton and 
several others over to 485 Madison Avenue, in some cases (Bennv- 
American Tobacco, for example) complete with sponsor. All this 
transpired in late 1948 and early 1949. 

But as has been indicated network radio came upon rough da\ s. 
Television moved in and blitzed it along with movies and magazines, 
sports and conversation. Remarkably enough independent, non- 
network affiliated radio, not only rode out the television storm, but 
prospered as it had never prospered before. A few columns back 
I mentioned the incredible amount of spot business every station 
I visited in 18 different cities was doing. 

Radio stations come high and sell fast 

And the trade press has been chocked with reports of the high 
traffic in radio station sales. Maybe the two recent record-breakers 
in the station sales category tell the story best. DuMont. which 
couldn't quite make it as a television network, bought New York's 
leading independent, WNEW, for ST. 5 million from a group of gents 
headed by William Buckley. Mr. Buckley and his friends had paid 
$4 million for the station just a few years earlier. 

And Westinghouse, shortly after servering its network radio 
affiliations with NBC, bought Chicago's leading independent station, 
WIND, for $5,300,000. And this in an era when television zoomed 
to greater gross billings than all of radio combined. In 1954 tv 
did $595,000,000 as against radio's $449,500,000. This was the 
first year that the combined broadcasting business topped the billion 
dollar mark. 

With so little space left, it's a little foolish to get into developments 
in television over this past decade, but a quick outline will serve to 
recall the tremendously exciting growth of the medium since 1946. 
In November of that year Bristol-Myers sponsored the first network 
tv show, a two-station hookup via NBC for a show called Geo- 
graphically Speaking. A few months ago CBS TV claimed, without 
getting too much of an argument, that 100,000.000 people saw its 
telecast of the Rodgers-Hammerstein Cinderella. 

It was in that same vear that Zenith's Commander E. F. Mr- 
Donald, Jr. wrote a piece in the now defunct Collier's magazine, 
maintaining that advertising alone would never be able to support 
television, that pay-tv was essential and inevitable. That same 
10-year span saw the battle between CBS mechanical and RCA 
electronic color tv with the latter victorious after CBS won several 
important early rounds. But more in subsequent columns on video's 
breathtakins last 10. ^ 



20 






SI'U\M)1! 



18 may 1957 



pick a number from 




No matter how many feature films your station programs, 
MGM-TV has a plan to fill your needs a plan that will 
bring you higher audience ratings and bigger sales increases 
than you ever imagined. 

For "one-time" impact, choose single pictures, individu- 
ally priced in keeping with their fabulous audience appeal. 

Or, for maximum economy, choose one of the already- 
packaged groups, consisting of from 100 to more than 
700 titles of the greatest motion pictures ever produced. 




Write, wire or phone 
now to determine it 
your market is still 
available. 




A SERVICE OF 
LOEWS INC. 



701 Seventh Avenu N. 1 

Richard A. Harper, General Sales Manager 



the fabulous features that 



started the 



f 


















^HER. 
YOUR 




* 






The human nose is being pushed around! It can't be sure of anything any 
more. And Science is to blame! Men spend long hours in laboratories, inventing magic formulas 
for removing the natural odor of things. Others take equal time to devise ways of introducing 
fragrances and flavors into places where they never existed. A nose for news might detect a trend. 

It's got to stop, say we ! Let things be as they really are ! 

We're doing our bit. In "The Silent Service," our syndicated TV film scries 
about the men who man the nation's submarines, we really plumb the depths. We go to ex- 
traordinary lengths— on location, in fact— to capture that true briny flavor. Why, yen can prac- 
tically breathe the diesel. The salt spray stings to high heaven. The pitch and roll, the sw< 
and grime, the sights and sounds and smells -they're all there, all real. And some scieiv 
thinks he's going to filter the breath of reality out of our series? Well, we'll see him inhale first ! 

And we've got friends, too. CNP, as more and more people are finding out, 
insists on giving local, regional and spot advertisers first crack at first-class product. But do you 
suppose for one minute that this is the reason "The Silent Service" has now been bought in more 
than 100 markets, including 21 of the country's top 25? Nonsense! With "The Silent S 
it's the zesty savor of reality that gets 'em ! NBC TELEVISION FILMS a division of 

CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 




The 8.000-foot Tehachapi Mountain 
Range is nature's own "sound barrier" 
between Bakersfield and Los Angeles. 
PROOF: No Los Angeles Radio Station 
has ever appeared on any recent Bakers- 
field Radio Area Survey. 
BAKERSFIELD RADIO MIST BE 
USED TO EFFECTIVELY REACH 
BAKERSFIELD BUYERS 




KGEE DOMINATES 

7:00 A.M. -12:00 Noon 

KGEE 22.8% 

2nd station 16.1% 

12:00 Noon -6:00 P.M. 

KGEE 30.1% 

2nd station 14.5% 

(C. E. Hooper, Inc. — Oct.-Nov., 1956) 
Share of Audience 

FOR COMPLETE KGEE STORY 

Call 

George P. Hollingbery Co. 

Herb Wixson, Station Mgr. 

BE CAGEY— BUY K-GEE! 



21 







News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



Help wanted? I his month a woman hecame head of advertising's 
oldest employment agency — Walter A. Lowen Placement Agency. 
Ruth Lowen, daughter of the founder, took over the business 6 Mav 
from her father who's retiring. 

In Lowen's 37-year history the stock of women in advertising 
has definitely risen. 

"But even today, only one woman for 20 men gets a job paying 
$10,000 or more a year. Under $10,000 the ratio shifts to one 
woman for every five men," Ruth Lowen told SPONSOR. 

How can a woman get around the boss' fear she'll soon leave to 
raise a brood? 

"Play it by ear," says Ruth Lowen. "Women executives have 
learned to do this. Women under 25 starting out in business just 
have to convince the men thev want a career, not a manhunt." 



Women's longing and drug sales: Phrasemaker Florence Goldin 
pegged women into four groups for drug manufacturers at a Toilet 
Goods Association meeting. 

Twigglings — girls between 12 and 18: they're experimenting, 
looking for new things. 

Huntresses — from 18 until they marry, they're perfectionists 
facing the most competitive battle of their lives. "They'll switch 
cosmetics brands until they score a hit," Florence says. 

Wife — now the woman is economy-conscious, looks for easy-to- 
buy products on super market shelves. 

December bride — she has money for the promises of youth. 

A beauty and fashion coordinator, Florence Goldin is both a wife 
and the only ladv v.p. at Grey Advertising. 



Is "suburban man" obsolete? Wives of admen who've been 
thinking of themselves as suburbanites or exurbanites might as well 
revise their thinking. According to the latest socio-psychological 
study, chances are they're '"interurbanites." 

Mrs. Interurbia, says the study, "is an expert in understanding 
others, examining motives, analyzing behavior." 

The interurbia study, conducted by J. Walter Thompson, Yale 
University and Fortune, says more and more Americans today live 
in virtually linked metropolitan areas. 

The vast majority of admen live in the 14 interurbias throughout 
the country. 

What's Mr. Interurbia like, according to JWT. Yale and Fortune? 

1. He's above the national average in desire for achievement, 
desires to rival and surpass others. 

2. He needs to dominate other people. 

3. He's more willing to talk about sex and less strict in attitudes. 

4. He likes to be the center of attention. \ anity and self-dramati- 
zation are stronger in him than in the non-interurbian. 

5. He's more assressive and does not mind change. 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



100,000,000 Americans 
Go Places And See Things! 



t 



Sell this 17 billion dollar market* with 

VAGABOND 



THE BIGGEST PLUS 

First run on a 
tested show— 
at a low cost 
per thousand! 

iStation KCOP Los Angeles 13 5 ARB 



•Research report available on this fab- 
ulous travel market. See the eye- 
opening figures for yourself. (They 
include almost all your potential 
VAGABOND viewers ) 



Reach the 100.000.000 Americans who are traveling the year round. These are the 
inquisitive, probing, sightseeing Americans visiting historical sites, famous monu- 
ments, national parks and vacation lands in every .state and country on the continent. 
There is concrete proof that the greatest travel boom in history is HERE AND NOW! 

• Americans spend 17 Billion Dollars for vacations annually. 

• Americans are on wheels — rolling along in over 41 Million autos. 

• Americans on the move take advantage of their travel opportunities — 2 /i of all 
wage and salary earners are eligible for annual paid vacations. 

With all America in the travel mood — VAGABOND gives you THE ONLY SHOW WITH 
THIS HUGE READY MADE MARKET. Take your audience where it wants to go in 
North America — to the lively playgrounds of the USA . to the nostalgic cities where 
history was made, to the Oregon rapids, to the famous ski resorts, to the National 
Parks of the Golden West, to gay. colorful Mexico, to beautiful, romantic Hawaii. 

Tune in all Travel-Minded America with Vagabond 



Produced by Bill Burrud Productions. 



# OFFICIAL FILMS 

^T^ ^) 25 West 45th Street . New 



INC. 

'ork 36, New York 



REPRESENTATIVES IN: 

Beverly Hills • Chicago • OaHat 

San Francisco* St Louis* Boston 

Minneapolis • Philadelphia 

Atlanta 







SPON-OK 



18 M \V 1 ( )-1. 



25 



li**" 







< Ik il plants on ilit Ohio Rivei banks draw pure, high quality rock sail from 

deep beneath tin surface. 1 lie salt is ideal foi the manufacture of chlorine and 
caustic soda, important ingredients in a wide varietj oi chemical products. Colum- 
bia Southern, Ulied Chemical, National Aniline and Mobaj Chemical are among 
the majoi chemical companies now operating in the Ohio Valley. In the past three 
years, chemical-plant construction in the WWVA area has passed the Muu million mark. 




Wheeling, the gateway to the midwest, is the focal point for 
retail sales, wholesale distribution and manufacturing in the area. 
Located on the hanks oi the beautiful Ohio rivei and on National 




THE BOOMING 
OHIO VALLEY 
AND WWVA 









ng area lies the nation's only natnial snpph of coal sufficient lot powe! 

i i aluminum plant- in the eastern I nited states. Here is the 

In tin 1 l.iii n.i Coal l o. New coal processes 

<Im>i. at prices competitive with Hydraulii power. 

■ in 10 miles li the Wheeling area. 



Wheeling were increased by 1,100,000 K\V during 

.is( iii the nation. Mill e is meded even \ear. 

ting facilities m tin \\ \\ \ \ area will he increased by 
anothei 1. .nun kU 





Route 10, Wheeling is the natural lml> ol i prosperous 
i. in market. In 1 1 > foreground is Wheeling's ne« multi 
I on Henn Hi 




i '»- unci ingi day in thi inn iti < I nulls in 1 1 ■ • 

in 1955 'in two majoi Ohio Va 

Hi » Igl |, .in in. 

ing Hi National rton Steel is .1 majoi division, ma 

million dollars will i» spent in expansion by 1957. Wheeling - 

1 .ill- ten 65 million in 1 xpansion 



Coal from the hills, sail From the earth and watei 
lioin the river make the Wheeling-WWVA area 
ilic nation's fastest growing industrial region. 
Urn' more than One Billion Dollars has been 
spent in the past live Years lor plant-expansion 
Snd new construction. AND A BILLION MORE 
IS PLANNED FOR THE IMMEDIATE 
FUTURE! 

For more than 30 years WWV \. the Friendly 
yoice, has been the area's leading radio station, 
the ONE advertising medium dominating a 2.2 
billion-dollar market. 



Surveys prove this dominant It.nK rship again 
and again. In the most recent \kl \IM LSI 
counties surrounding Wheeling were measured. 
In every instance WWV \ was the favorite station 
by a wide margin. WWV A ranked first in ever) 
quarter-hour surveyed horn 6:00 am to 12 mid- 
night, seven days a week. Ever) hour, ever) d.i\. 
WWVA topped them all. 

I HE WHEELING \K1 \ . . . a BOOMING 

STORER MARkl I . best served, and b 

SOLD. h\ WWV V 



|l BROADCASTING 
W «OMPANT 



WSRD WJW WJBK WAGA WBRC WWVA WCBS 

Toledo, Ohio Cleveland. Ohio DeifOit, Michigan Allonta, Georg.o B.,rmnghom. Alobama 



WSPD-TV WJW-TV WJBK-TV WAGA-TV WBRC-TV 

Toledo, Oh.o Cleveland. Ohio Delro.1. M.ch Anonio. Go 



KPTV WOBS-TV 



NEW YORK — 625 Madison Avenue, New York 22 
SALES OFFICES CHICAGO — 230 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Franklin 2-6498 
SAN FRANCISCO — lit Sutter Street, San Francisco, Sutter 1-8669 



- ^fc*T » » ■ - — — __ " 




Ohio Ri.er provides Wheeling industry with low co-t transportation 
: the nation's population. Annual Ohio Ri.er shipping is now 
iat.it close to 85 million tons. Railro.nl> plan -JO, 000,000 for improve- 
to meet the WWVA ana's booming industry. 



*■::■■■■■'.■.,: fy? '' 




A 



'-■; 









Recent influx nf primary aluminum manufaciurine means hunti- 
new plant- to process and Fabricate the product. Olin Mall 

ilion dollar basic plant -t full, integrated aluminum 

plant— so huge that n> 1 power plant- are being con- 

structei it. Re>ult: Thousands of new jobs and new families 

for the WWVA Market. 




Handy Bookmark Series 



P en0U lOTMteW •— 



Keep your place 
in Los Angeles 
icith KTTV 




Rep 



rese" 



ted «°"° n 



|^«&#«*** 



a«# 



a*l***^ 



i**** 



49th an 
Madi 



28 



Stoopnagle story 

Noting iiiaiix amusing bits in SPONSOR, 
thought you might get a chuckle from 
one of the most uproarious incidents 
I've encountered in radio. 

Some years ago, I was producing 
and directing Col. Stoopnagle's Quixie- 
Doodle Quiz, sponsored by Mennen. I 
was in the control booth, giving signals 
to my assistant on stage, Sid Nameless 
( he's now a prominent advertising ex- 
ecutive i . 

Near the end of one show, Stoop- 
nagle started milking a funny contest- 
ant. We were running out of time, so 
I signalled to Sid to speed up the Colo- 
nel. Sid revolved his hand toward 
Stoop, with the classic speed-up signal. 
Stoop ignored him. I signalled harder 
to Sid, who signalled faster to Stoop. 
No result. 

Stoop still paid no attention. In 
complete desperation, Sid turned to the 
front of the stage — and revolved his 
hand hvstericallv AT THE AUDI- 
ENCE! 

Samm S. Baker, 

Executive Staff, 

Donahue & Coe, New York 

P.S. Me? I managed to cut to the 
closing commercial and sign-off. just 
before I collapsed with laughter. 

That tower looks familiar 
While carefully perusing the April 6 
issue of sponsor, I was delighted to 
come across a photograph of our mag- 
nificent 670 foot tower I page 30). 
I'm glad that you decided that our 
tower was so representative of the tele- 
vision industry that vou chose it for 
this particular article. 

We're always glad to have pictures 

of our facilities in the leading trade 

publication and a small six-point credit 

line would also make us most happy. 

R. A. Fillmore, manager, advertising 

& promotion, WBJJF, Buffalo 

E.T. Co. very much alive 
A famous wit, on reading an untimely 
report of his death, was said to have 
(Please turn to page 35) 



SPONmiK 



18 may 1957 



SI 






ORINTHI 



WISH & WISH-TV 1 



J.H. 



Whitney & Company an- 
nounces the formation of the 
Corinthian Broadcasting Corpo- 
ration to coordinate the manage- 
ment policies of its stations. 

The television stations are WISH- 
TV Indianapolis, WANE-TV 
Fort Wayne, KOTV Tulsa and 
KGUL-TV Galveston, serving 
Houston. 

The radio stations areWISH Indi- 
anapolis and WANE Fort Wayne. 

All are CBS affiliates. 

'Always to be best, 
and distinguished above the rest" 

HOMER, 900 B. C. 




Responsibility in Broadcasting 

BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



630 Fifth Avenue. New York 20, N. V. 
inapolis, WANE & WANE-TV Fort Wayne. KOTV Tulsa. KGUL-TV Galveston, serv 







>tv 



^STUWTnf^ 



KOTV 



KOTV has more viewers 
in the rich Tulsa market 
than all other stations 
combined.* 

(^CBS Basic Affiliate 
Represented by Petry 



*TOTAL WEEK (ARB, FEB. '57, AND NCS *2) 



"V 



r® 




4*L4 









CORINTHIAr 



iSH & WISH-TV Indianapolis. WANE 



KGUL-T V 



KGUL-TV now leads all 
other stations in the 
Houston area ARB* 

and is the only station 
delivering city-grade sig- 
nal in both Houston and 
Galveston. 

^ CBS Basic Affiliate 

Represented by CBS 
Television Spot Sales 



♦TOTAL WEEK (ARB, FEB. '57 AND HOUSTON-GAL- 
VESTON TELEPULSE, JAN '57) 



STATIONS Responsibility in Broadcasting 

("ANE-TV Fort Wayne. K.OTV Tulsa. KGUL-TV Galveston, serving HouJton 




k.'B V 



r'^J 






WISH 



rm 



.Hiiiiiiiii 



WISH-TV has more 
viewers in Indianapo- 
lis than all other stations 
combined.* 

^ CBS Basic Affiliate 
Represented by Boiling 



*TOTAL WEEK (ARB, JAN. '57. NSI AREA, DEC. '56, 
TELEPULSE, OCT. '56) 











r ANE-TV 



WANE-TV now leads 
in the billion dollar all- 
UHF Fort Wayne market.* 



^ CBS Affiliate 
Represented by Petry 



♦TOTAL WEEK (15 COUNTY FORT WAYNE AREA 
ARB. FEB. '57) 



S TAT IONS Responsibility in Broadcasting 

H & WISH-TV Indianapolis, WANE |||||§|1LnE-TV Fort Wayne. KOTV Tulsa. KGUL-TV Galveston, serving Houston 







LilU 







RADIO 



?'* 






CORINTHI 



WI 




Indianapolis 




fl 



1^ 



Bi 



Fort Wayne 



Serving the radio needs of 
these two major Indiana 
markets. 

Jf CBS Radio Affiliates 



S TAT IONS Responsibility in Brc 



WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis, W>|MB lift WANE-TV Fort Wayne, KOTV Tulsa, KGUL-TV Galveston, setving 



49TH AND MADISON continued 

remarked thai reports ol his passing 
were gross!) exaggerated. 

This remark w < >u 1< I be the under- 
rtatemenl of the decade ii applied t<> 
t h<- implied non-existence "I Standard 
Radio Transcription Services of Chica- 
go b\ the omission of this companj - 
name from the li-i oi service compa- 
nies i" the broadcasting industr) in 
the \ \l! II! convention issue of spon- 
sor. W e would like to poinl out w h\ 
our deep resentment "I this omission 
i- justified : 

Firsl "I all, (In- Standard Program 
Librar) of transcribed music is -till 
inn- uf the greatest, both qualitj and 
Belectionwise, and it has the added 
advantage of being available for out- 
righl PI RCH \H either as a complete 
lil.i,n\ ui a partial. It contains over 
.">. mini musical selections plus approxi- 
match 150 jingles ami commercial 

aid-, and lids latter ^r«ni|) ma\ be 

leased separately. 

Then, our SOI M) EFFECTS Li- 
brary . consisting "I' 21 I discs, is 
unquestionably tin- most complete and 
finest collection id sound effects; while 
oui new LAWRENCE WELK LI- 
BR \RY package is an outstanding 
collection id 212 of Welk's best — with 
Welk voice tracks. This i- a most 
economical bu) with no tie-ins-. 

Last, but n..t least, SHORTY 
Tl NES, the recording «>f 20 top pops 
and standards bj leading bands and 
combos all instrumental — offered to 
subscribers mi a monthly subscription 
basis without a long-term contract, 
was a Standard innovation in the field 
.it a complete service of short selec- 
tions for -pecial broadcaMini: needs. 

\\l. \IU. \ im Ml (II VLIVE 
\\l> KICKING. 

Otherwise, I believe SPONSOR is an 
excellent publication. 

\1. M. Blink, president. Standard Radio 
Transcription Services. Inc.. Chicago 



TV Guide guided 

In case \ou ha\en t seen T\ Guide for 

the week of May I- through 10, our 

editorial is based on facts from 

SPONSOR. 

Liz Trousihton. promotion 
manager. Tl Guide, Chicago 

# I \ (.uitlr «*<litnrial quote* information on 
n.iw..rk *ho* failure- *hirh appeared in SPON- 
SOR-SCOPE and Wrap-Op, 1:1 April. 



( 



Over THREE 

BILLION dollars spent 

annually in retail 

sales by residini In 

KTHT's coverage area. 

Get your share. 

Buy Houston's 

"most-for-your-money" 

station, KTHT. 







SELL 

THEM 

ON 



MBS for 
Houston and 
South Texas 

Represented 

Nationally 

by Paul Raymer 



*^7^*,on«c 




5000 



Spring has sprung 
in Providence. R. I. 




• afternoon audience 
grows 324% 

• morning audience 
grows 297% 

WICE is now either first or second i 
audience in 16 daytime quarter hours. 

... in just 6 months of Elliot 
programming 

Source: C. E. Hooper. Jan.-M.irrh 1957 



The ELLIOT STATIONS 

great independents • good neighbors 



TIM ELLIOT. President 



Akron. Ohio - WCUE WICE - Prov.dence. R I. 

Nntior.nl Representatives The John E. Pearson Co. 



SPON-i'K 



1!! M\\ L957 



35 



/ 



/ 



( 



KBET TV s"LEO" 

(forgive the 2nd billing, M-G-M) 



\ 



\ 

\ 



ARE READY TO ROAR!/ 7 



\ 



y 




KBET-TV is now the only station capable of bringing the greatest proven movies 
to California's Central Valley, 52 weeks every year... 



. . . with exclusivity on MGM pictures in KBET's 
entire coverage area! The first and only Northern 
California station to buy the entire huge MGM 
film package. 

. . . PLUS exclusivity on almost 800 RKO features. 
. . . PLUS hundreds from Warner Bros., Columbia, 



20th Century-Fox, David O. Selznick, United Art- 
ists and other major film companies. 
A total of over 1700 tremendous motion pictures 
not yet shown in the Sacramento-Stockton market 
— more than twice as many as all of KBET's com- 
petitors combined! 



•"GREAT MOVIE" 

nightly at 10:00 and 

Sunday afternoons 




TOTAL AREA 

SET COUNT 

401,097 



•MOVIE MATINEE 
Monday through 
Friday, 4:00 p.m. 



KBET-TV CHANNEL 10 



SACRAMENTO 



BASIC 




CALIFORNIA 



CBS OUTLET 



Call H-R Television, Inc. for Current Avails 



36 



SPONSOR 



18 may 195"; 



^PO N SO R 




-/ 



— J 



'""II (,. i 
piicit, of "'"'"'■ 



Broadcasters countei 





NO 



iiiai 



radio « ■«*■* V u 

rcialuedofall 

dia iv, print, outdooi j 

J 



IS RADIO 



O 



VER-COMMERCIAL? 



Advertisers worry about commercial impact in traffic hours, yel 
insist on those hours. Broadcasters are caught in the middle 



W 



hich is better for the advertiser: 
a slot with a 6 rating and two com- 
mercials in it or a slot with a lower 
rating but only one commercial in it? 

This is the simplest way of stating a 
question that plagues both clients and 
agencies today. Is radio over-commer- 
cialized? Is it crowding a dispropor- 
tionate number of announeements into 
a time segment? If so. is the multi- 
plicity of announeements canceling out 
their effectiveness? 

Certainb the concern of advertisers 
is reasonable. And many station men 
are themselves deeply concerned. 

In the two hours between 7 and *) 
a.m.. sponsor monitored one station 



whose programing included a 15-min- 

ute sponsored segment. Not counting 
the latter, the remaining hour and 1 5 
minute-, was filled with 50 mixed an- 
nouncements. On another show, be- 
tween 10:45 and 11 a.m.. were aiied 
10 announcements consisting of four 
one-minutes, four half-minute- and two 
20-seconds, or a total of six minutes 
and 40 seconds commercial time m ithin 
a l.Vminute period. I hi- i- twice the 
maximum Dumber of commercial min- 
ute- prescribed for a single sponsor 
within the same time period b\ 
NARTR in its "Standard- of Good 
Practice for Radio Broadcasters." 
This jam-packed schedule is an ex- 



treme case. But it's b\ ii" mean- an 

unusual one. Foi stations t"da\ are in 
the focus "f intense pressure to jet m\- 
\erti-er- into the so-called "prime- 
time" 1 • I • •• k- see "Don't be prime-time 

blind." SPONSOR 16 Mar. h 

Arthur Pardoll, media -roup din 
toi at Foote, Cone -\ fielding, told the 
Connecticut Broadcasters Association 
at a recent meeting: "Main of u- .\r>- 
lei oming justifiably alarmed about 
over-commercialization. When 2" or 
more one-minute and 20-second com- 
mercials are crowded into an hour, the 
effectiveness of radio i- seriousl) x i t i - 
ated." 

The same concern moved Win. r-t\ 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



Over-commercialization, it it really does 
exist, can only be licked by better programing 
plus less client insistence on "prime times" 



Co. in Januarj to request lo<zs from 
those stations on which it was sched- 
uling announcements. "We onl\ a ked 
once for these logs," said Dick Grahl, 
Esty's radio-tv buyer, "and got an ex- 
cellent response. What's more we j:ot a 
lot of letters from stations compliment- 
ing us on what we were doing. 

"We did it," Grahl explains, "be- 
cause we're interested in spot radio. 
We think it's a fine medium. We don't 
want anything to happen to diminish 
its effectiveners. At the same time. 
we've got an obligation to our clients 
which we pass on to the stations for 
fulfillment." 

I he logs showed up a variety of 
practices — good, bad and indifferent. 
There were cases of double-spotting 
or of "inadequate separation"' between 
commercials for competing brands. 
Thev also showed that there are a lot 
of stations that stick to their guns, 
station that will turn away advertisers 
rather than jam them into too little 
time. 

Grahl feels this is one way to lick 
the problem. "The stations have got 



to have some polic\ to turn down busi- 
ness when they're 'sold out.' The ra- 
dio advertiser must just wait for an 
opening in the same way that a print 
advertiser may have to wait for the 
back cover of The Saturday Evening 
Post." 

Esty was not the only agency to re- 
quest station logs. In Chicago, the 
Shaw- Company recently sent out a call 
for them. And while Esty has request- 
ed no more logs since January, its 
field force is still monitoring stations, 
as are many of the other top advertis- 
ing agencies. 

"Our people in the field." says Ray 
Jones, all-media buyer at Y&R, "are 
constantly on the watch for bad spot- 
ting practices. Whenever thev turn up. 
it means a call on the station or a re- 
port back here to the agency." 

Not only are stations monitored by 
agencies, but they are monitored by 
competing stations in their areas. Such 
policing within the broadcasting indus- 
try itself has turned up such extreme 
examples of "commercialism" as run- 



BUYERS' VIEWPOINT 



Arthur Pordoll 
/ oote, ( one & Belding 

"Let stations start using 
NARTB Code as a guide. 
In an hour music show, 
18 commercials is plenty. 
15 minutes should see 
separate rival products." 



Dick Grahl 

Wm. Esty Co. 

'"Stations have got to have 
courage to turn clients 
away when full. And ra- 
dio advertisers must wait 
for a slot as for cover of 
Saturday Evening Post." 



Jerry Sachs 

Doyle Dane Bernbadi 

" Vds strung together are 
not programing — they're 
a shopping guide. Adver- 
tisers must stop clamor- 
ing for 'prime time,' sta- 
tions must sell all hours." 



'.ill mum mmnuimn inn in iiiiiiiin 11 niiiini nil ilium mil Hill m I liillllillinil linilliil I m in mil Willi? 

SELLERS' VIEWPOINT 

i.'i||lllllllllllllllli r .'llllllllllliliililiililliiillllllllllllliinilliiiiiiliiniilli|i|iiiiiliiiiii' ijniiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiillliililiiiiiiiiilliliiiiiiiiiiilillilililllllliimillliiiiillilllliilililliiliiiiiillii^ 



Rolf Brent 
ii if. Philadelphia 

"To lick overcrowding, 
stations might charge 
premium with guarantee 
against double-spotting, 
advertisers must spread 
id traffic hours." 



Paul Weeks 
HR Representatives, Inc. 

"Retention is influenced 
by many factors other 
than number of different 
impressions. It is too easy 
to generalize about com- 
mercial load of show." 



inn i miiiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiniiiii iiiiiiiiiiiimn iimimiii mini i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilim inilii.i 



Wells Barnett 

John Blair 

"Solution lies in good 
programing which, of 
course, includes slotting 
of announcements. Radio 
is less commercialized 
than anv other media." 



ning competitive advertisers back-to- 
back and clipping 15 to 30 seconds off 
60-second commercials in order to 
crowd more into a time block. 

On the other hand, it must be re- 
membered that some of the agencies 
which criticize such practices — justifi- 
able as such criticisms are — are them- 
selves guilty of what, in auto accident 
cases, is often termed "contributory 
negligence." Their insistence, or their 
clients' insistence, on getting into the 
so-called "prime time" morning shows 
is sometimes backed up with a good 
deal of pressure. Such pressure has 
been known to take the form of an 
ultimatum: "Get us in there between 
7 and 9 a.m. or else." "Or else" can 
be a weighty club if the client happens 
to be using a 15-minute across-the- 
board participation in the afternoon. 

"It seems that the loudest complaints 
against the problem of over-commer- 
cialization of radio in popularized 
times — if there is such a problem — are 
from the very advertisers who demand 
saturation schedules in such times ex- 
clusively," says Paul R. Weeks, vice 
president and partner of H-R Repre- 
sentatives, Inc. 

"Tv," says Weeks, "appears to run 
multiple spots in succession and adver- 
tisers don't seem to feel it cuts their 
effectiveness. Outdoor advertisers 
seemingly do not complain if there are 
six to 10 billboards in a group. Classi- 
fied advertisers don't seem to care if 
there are a couple of hundred ads on a 
single page with no editorial content 
between them. Display advertisers in 
newspapers don't seem to worry how 
many ads. all selling soft lines or either 
of the hard lines — liquor or appliances 
— appear on the same page. \S e can 
only conclude it must be the tremen- 
dous effectiveness of the audible mes- 
sage that singles radio out from all 
other media for this attack." 

There are others who feel radio mav 
well be the lea-t commercialized of all 
media. 

An hour radio show containing 15 
minutes of commercial time might be 
said to have a ratio of 25% advertising 
to 70' < programing. The usual rule 
of thumb for magazine make-up is 
60' i advertising to 40 r r editorial con- 
tent or more. The inside pages of an 
eight-column daily newspaper may well 
consist of seven columns of advertis- 
ing, or a ratio of ST 1 ;/; advertising to 
I2V2'' editorial copy. Even if an hour- 
long radio show contained 30 one- 
minute announcements, or a 50-50 ra- 



38 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



NUMBER LIKING SHOW DROPPED ONLY 9% AS COMMERCIALS DOUBLED 
TEST I. Audience exposed to 45-minute show, 'five commercials 




INDEX 



100 



TESTfll. Then exposed to 10 commercials in same show 



^UHl'i in 



91 



Schwerin Research I »rp.. in 1949, measured f"r a radio networE 
the effect ol increasing the comber of commercials in daytime pro- 
grams. The ali<>\e t hart is baaed "ii a ki\ pair of these tests. What 
Schwerin did was to run matched-sample teats in the sam<- show, the 



lir-t time with five commercials, the Becond time doubling th< number. 
In Test I. tin- commeroia] time was in a relationship of about one t" 
eight to entertainment; in Test II this relationship was roughlj «>n« 
to three-and-a-half. The loss in likeabilit) in Test II was onl] 



tio, it would -till show a lower percent 
of "commercialism" than these other 
media. 

Nevertheless there is the growing 
concern about the multiplicity of radio 
commercials. Arthur Pardoll pin- 
pointed it in the speech to the Connec- 
ticut Broadcasters mentioned previous- 
ly. *'. . . the advertiser wonders." he 
said, "whether his commercial, sur- 
rounded b) too many other advertisers 
will have sufficient memorability im- 
pact. The bigh commercial traffic in 
morning radio aggravates the condi- 
tion. Advertisers could very well con- 
sider turning to media where the pre- 
sentation of their story can be made in 
a more receptive climate and under 
more favorable conditions." 

Pardoll was not just raising a prob- 
lem. He has an answer on how it can 
be licked. "Let the stations start using 
the XARTB code as a guide. In a 
morning music program there should 
be a maximum of 18 commercials with- 
in an hour. If a station cant produce 
a profit on 18 spots an hour, then 



there's something wrong." The 1!! an- 
nouncements Pardoll refers to would 
be 20s and minutes: he is not count- 
ing I.D.'s at break time. 

"No station," Pardoll told sponsor. 
"should resort to double-spotting. Be- 
tween competitive products or con- 
flicting copj theme- there should be at 
least 15 minute- separation. 

" \ station can put into effect a pol- 



of 



IB tit 



e numlier 



of 



nouncements in a -how without resort- 
ing to anything as drastic as turning 
out current advertisers. Cancellations, 
expirations and non-renewal- ol adver- 
tising contracts will automatical!} take 
care of the problem." Thus it a client 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Advertisers and broadcasters are both 
concerned with the charges of over- 
commercialization of radio. Many feel 
radio is. in fact, less commercialized 
than other media. But if it is crowd- 
ing too many spots into too little time, 
then advertisers also are to blame. 



cancels or fail- to renew, anil i- no| re- 
placed l>\ another, then- i- on.- ad less. 
Pardoll pointed <>ot that a number of 
stations have abroad) begun !•• i ut 
down on announcements in this 
Initial]} it meam .i slight drop in busi- 
ness in some • ases. Bui tin- proved 
onl} temporar} . and the} re now d< 

better than evei financial.) . 

KaU Brent, vice president tnd - 
manager of \\ 1 1'. Philadelphia, ad- 
vanced hi- own views on how stations 

could meet the charge "I over-con. 

i iali/atioii : 

1. ( barge a premium rat r- that will 
r an \ w ith it ,i _mi.ii antee against dou- 
ble spotting. I Minute annoum en 
should never run back-to-back; with 

l'l- and 20's at station break-, bow- 

ever, this is almost bound t cur.) 

2. Convince advertisers to spread 
out schedules tatlier than tr\ to 
squeeze into traffic time-. Double- 
spotting and overcrowding would be 
non-existent if advertisers would 
spread out from (> a.m. to 1 1 p.m. in- 

I Please turn t<> pax.'- 88 1 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



39 




CAN PA | 



I his week the Pat Weaver of May 
1957 was out selling hard against a 
tough competitor: the Pat Weaver 
<>f wars past. 

More than am other man. Pat 
Weaver helped create hig-time, big- 
money television. Now he's in effect 
selling the exact opposite. 

His new Program Service is de- 
signed to '"fill the gap" between local 
and network tv. offering advertisers a 
low-budget 15-city hookup. 

Pat Weaver is still an idea-a-minute 
man. Beyond the 15-city network, his 
multitude of plans I mostly still in the 
contemplation and negotiation stage I 
include: 

1. Ownership of stations. "'It ma\ 
come through any day.' he told 
SPONSOR. 

2. Production of tv series on con- 
tract for advertisers to be placed on 
the three existing networks. 

3. Production of feature films star- 
ring Sid Caesar, whose appearance on 
NBC T\ next season is now in doubt. 

Right now. however, at Weavers 
new 430 Park Avenue headquarters, 
the focus is on the fourth network. 
Weaver is making the rounds among 
advertisers and agencies to line up cli- 
ents. He and his three-man staff are 
talking to independent stations in the 
top 15 markets. 

At sponsors presstime. no station 
had actually signed, but two major in- 
dependents. Vi GN-T\ . Chicago, and 
KMGM-TV . Minneapolis, have pub- 
licly expressed interest in becoming 
"\\ eaver affiliates."' While Weaver 
hasn't rung up a sale yet. he says the 
reactions of advertisers and agencies 
have been favorable. 

Weaver spoke frankly to SPONSOR on 
his progress, his opinions of network 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



i 



.ICK HIS OWN SYSTE 



His low-cost network isn't Weaveresque. But it's the base of an operation which ma) 
eventually include station ownership, t\ and feature film production 



programing toda) and his hopes for 
the future. These were sponsor's ques- 
tions with Pal Weaver's verbatim an- 
swers .1- he gave them from behind 
the familiar mammoth I. -shaped desk 
in iii> freshly-painted new office. 

Q. U here do you stand in lining up 
stations as affiliates? 
A. Most independent stations in the 
LS top markets we're talking about 
know what times we're considering, 
but there aren't firm agreements yet. 
It wont !>c an option time system, but 
rather we II have an agreement to clear 
a certain percentage <>f their time. 

Fundamentally, it will he the same 
compensation arrangements with sta- 

tions the major networks have. In re- 
turn for fixed times, they'll gel a -hair 
of our income. 

Well he going into it on a project- 
In -project hasis. Bj next fall we hope 

to program 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 
Then we'll add 1 :00-3:00 p.m. During 
the morning we're contemplating all 

live half-hour formats, while the after- 
noon ma) encompass hour-long shows. 

Q. II hat programs do you have 
lined up as of now? 
A. Vie plan to he a full fourth net- 
work eventually. We're developing pro- 
grams for daytime main!) as a starter 
and we've made no announcement of 
properties vet. But we do have avail- 
ahle Ding Dong School and the pro- 
grams of syndicators and program 
packagers. We'll build some shows 
ourselves and contract for others. 

Time costs to the client will he much 
cheaper than on the other networks. 
But program costs ahove-the-line will 
be comparable to network show costs. 



{). ) on always stressed bringing 

peaks of excitement anil cultural /"//- 

anee to ii. Where's the excitement 

in M>ur plan of operation '? 

A. \ business need- a commercial 
foundation first and then it can de- 
velop the excitement. You can't start 
with the extras before you L;et the base. 
That's what we did at NBC — we 
worked on the commercial base and on 
the excitement shows as well. Here too 
we expect to develop highl) exploitable 
nighttime shows. But first we're con- 
centrating on the staples. 

K). If hat s been the reaction so far/ 

A. Everybody's favorable among ad- 
vertisers and in the agencies. The buy- 
ers like it. other agencv executives like 
it. The) haven't made an) commit- 
ment yet, but the) haven't raised anv 
objections to the idea either. 

{). II ho are you calling on? 

A. I've called myself on most major 
agencies, mans t\ v.p. s, account super- 
visors. Between us. we're covering all 
bases at agencies and among advertis- 
ers too. not to mention station calls. 



ij. II In should a nia/oi nationa 

vertisei buy a fractional audiet 
\. \m advertiser isn'l as interested in 
size of audience necessaril) as he is in 
conversion into sales. We ma) be able 
to match his customers more close!) 
h ■ 1 1 1 mil show \ « ■ 1 1 i « les. I "i example, 
we ma) have a higher cost- per- 1,000 
and still produce a lower cost-per-sale. 

i}. H h\ do Mm think there's need jot 

a fourth nclu hi I. ? 

\. There's a need for us on various 
levels. Foi one tiling, segments of the 
potential viewing audience are being 
overlooked bv the existing networks. 
Secondly, advertisers need a tv vehicle 
in between the local and the major net- 
work level for their marketing needs. 
We offer them such a vehicle "ii as 
flexible a basis as the) and tlxir 
agenc) mighl want. 

\nd there"- need h>r programs thai 
have freshness and impact and excite- 
ment and that can be advertising vehi- 
cle- at the same time. 

(J. Ire you i on< nitrating on this 

fourth network >n do you haic other 










Old Pat *u dedicated i<> high-cost Bpectacolan 
-hareii l>\ Beveral clients, irregularis scheduled 



New Pat plans t" oppose big n»t- with I"*- 
m-t h«"'knp wilh -how- lik.<- Ding Don/i S< hnt,l 






SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



41 



PAT WEAVER continued . . . 

plans i add tion to this current one? 

A. There are a number of things in 

the hopper. \\ e could produce pro- 
ing for advertisers to use on other 
orks, be it ABC CBS or NBC. 

And Ave might take over facilities 

ownership. 

Q. How are you selling or planning 
to sell programing? 
\. Mainly, we'll be selling participa- 
tions where daytime's concerned. But 
that depends on the agency. Do they 
want wideh distributed tonnage or the 
whole impact of full programing? If 
they want full program sponsorship, 
they can buy that. 

Q. You've criticized the imitativeness 
of network tv fare this year. Do you 
attribute that to advertiser and agency 
pressure and wouldn't they exert more 
pressure upon you as a smaller organi- 
zation than upon an NBC or CBS? 
A. The advertiser doesn't exert much 
creative pressure. On network, when 
the client pays $125,000 an hour, he 
worries about the size of audience and 
is willing to be sold on safer concepts 
— such as cowboy shows or mysteries. 



When we provide time for little 
money, he can try for experiments and 
for a run-awa) hit. 

Q. Do you expect then that advertis- 
ers may use your network to test vehi- 
cles for major network use? 
A. We may develop into a proving 
ground for shows. Certainly it's im- 
portant to give new show formats a 
trial run. Talent too needs to have 
such an opportunity. But an advertiser 
with an expensive time period on the 
major networks isn't going to gamble 
on a new personality for example. 
He'll take the tried, dried-up old estab- 
lished announcers he feels safe with. 
We aren't discounting the established 
show or personality that continues to 
be successful. But on our operation, 
the client can give new talent a chance 
and develop new Godfreys or Garro- 
ways, as well as new approaches. 

Q. What do you think of the fall net- 
work tv programing lineup? 
A. (Shrug, grin). Next fall's night- 
time tv would certainly give us an op- 
portunity, but we won't be ready for it. 
By now most major buys for fall have 




Program Service is -mall operation thus far under ex-NBCers: Pat Weaver who quips 
head seven department-" : Lewis Marcy, sales executive; Giraud Chester, general executive 



been made, nor could we develop a full 
lineup in time for the next season. But 
the audience won't be too happy with 
all the saddle sores and mysteries. 

We believe that in regularly sched- 
uled format programing the content is 
necessarily more limited. Whereas if 
you just know you've got an hour to 
program with theater-type content, you 
have more creative freedom. If vou 
call a format Wagon Train or Crisis or 
Panic, you're inhibiting the talent from 
producers to writers. There's too much 
of that on network today. 

Also, if you tie your show format to 
such a limiting concept, you take the 
exploitation value out of tv. In build- 
ing a program schedule that has differ- 
ent components each week, you have 
news value each week. Radio or regu- 
larly scheduled tv doesn't have this 
exploitation value and tv seems to be 
returning to the radio pattern. 

A familiar tv schedule will influence 
viewing and habits will become settled. 
If you know what to expect, vou won't 
be searching for new things to watch 
each week. 

Q. What other plans did you con- 
sider before forming this organization 
and why did you pick this? 
A. Well, I like to feel I'm needed in 
this medium. And I also feel that tele- 
vision today needs the intermediary 
step between local and full network 
which we're proposing for the various 
reasons I mentioned earlier. 

But there were also personal reasons 
for my doing this combined with the 
fact that I prefer this to being in an 
agency or big companv. 

Q. How are you operating? 
A. We're a four-man network. You 
might say that I'm a seven-department 
head at this point. We're all talking to 
agencies, advertisers and stations. The 
verdict is that this should happen. 

Q. Do you believe the major net- 
tvorks should continue to produce pro- 
graming or abdicate this role? 
A. \^ ell. this is their first year of ab- 
dicating it and we don't know yet how 
they'll do but I think they'll be sorry. 
I've always felt that major networks 
should be programing companies and 
nothing else. The main business of a 
network is to develop, produce and dis- 
tribute programing. That's the gap 
we are going to fill. ^ 



; 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




IT ftHSB MBKTO MM T* MK fUQ « M $ * , Q Q Q """ ' 



TV h. W._ «. . 



— — -. — — — - ■ -, 



M* » ■ ■ ' ' i i i ■ i i i ii 



SATURATION RADIO PUT ZIP 
IN THIS CONTEST 

Englander may move inarket-l>\ -market after hitting jackpot in 

San Francisco with treasure hunt promoting its mattresses and springs 



^^ ( IIICAGO 

I he Kni: lander Co., a loading manu- 
facturer of mattresses, box springs and 
dual sleep equipment, is determining 
its final equations in a formula for 
radio spectaculars. 

What's a radio spectacular? \ com- 
bination of saturation frequency, show- 
manship and drama in some kind of a 
special one-shol format. Englander, 

after trying tins combination for one 
month in one of its biggest p ttential 
market areas, started to sort out in 
mid-April the elements in its radio pro- 
motion and to come up with a formula. 
That's when its month-long Treasure 
Hunt in the San Francisco-Oakland 
area came to an end — and a highh 



successful our it was, in the opinion 
id' Knjilander president Ira \I. Pink. 
The company had tried a similar 
dealer-consumer advertising and pro- 
motion campaign in New ""i oik last 
fall. After re-evaluating some ol the 
approaches, and adding a lot of new 
idea-, it moved into San Francisco for 
the hunt — and a heaw radio barrage 
— on 1 7 March. 

The plan: I se saturation radio an- 
nouncement-, at the rati- ol -"in.- 100 
over a four-week period, on one station 
only. That station was KSFO, a round- 
the-clock independent. Supporting me- 
dia wen- television, with two announce- 
ments weekh on KPIX, San Francisco, 



and local newspapers, with three tie-in 
advertisements pei week with names ol 
retailers carrying th< i--r line. 

I nglander had U\>- basi< obj© tives 
in picking ".in I rani i-< " for this 
rial a<\ push and in using a satui i 
radio gii eawaj i ontest Ml five 

mplished," in the opinion of a< 
count supervisor Richard Fechheimei 
at North Advertising In. .. < he 

These five goals 
awareness of the I nglandei name. _' 
associate it in people*- minds with 
andei - ex< lusive Red-Line i on- 
struction feature, available in both the 
innerspring and the Virfoam set, 



& 



Listeners got their hidden treosure map at dealers, then followed the 
Red Line after hearing radio clues. Englander got big payoff, too. 



SPONSOR 



18 MAY L957 



r. 



With 300 announcements in four weeks, 
Englander had all San Francisco hunting the prize 



I > i give the retailers a chance to 
use unusually, newsy, provocative and 
interesting displays in windows as well 
as in store interiors. I 4) encourage the 
retailer to carry both Red-Line mat- 
In --.s models, innerspring and Airfoam 
i thus gaining wider distribution )>\ 
the store promotion of both I . and (5) 
create store traffic." 

Saturation radio was the medium 
through which Englander gained its 
mass coverage, but it took an attention- 
getting contest to make an impact on 
potential consumers. And it took in- 
tensive pre-contest merchandising with 
some 150 retail stores in the San Fran- 
cisco metropolitan area to back up the 
advertising and to follow through with 
merchandising on this advertising. 

The contest chosen was the peren- 
nial broadcast favorite — a money give- 
away. Englander scheduled the Treas- 
ure Hunt in this way. It concealed a 
draft for $5,000, redeemable by any- 
one who found it. during the first week 
in the four-week contest. The money 



prize in each of the remaining three 
weeks was $1,000. 

Kickoff to the campaign was circula- 
tion of the Treasure map. available 
only at Englander dealers. Radio 
listeners were told in the radio an- 
nouncements that a map. with a red 
line running through it and passing 
at some point over the hidden treasure 
site, was available free. Demand for 
the map was so great that the original 
run was quickly exhausted and an 
additional quantity was printed. 

The Red-Line theme was integrated 
into all advertising copy, and all in- 
store and point-of-sale promotions. 
Englander's Red-Line construction, an 
exclusive feature with the company, 
is really two springs in one. joined 1>\ 
a thin strip of steel. The top coil is 
completely free-moving, and is thus 
able to adjust to the sleeper's body and 
movements, allowing him to relax com- 
pletely and comfortably. 

So the Red Line, in the same way, 
supported all the advertising and pro- 



motion themes. It appeared in the 
newspaper ads, the window streamers 
and in an adhesive-type tape which 
was put on store and automobile win- 
dows, glass doors, point-of-sale signs. 

The Red-Line promotion was a suc- 
cess, but exactly hoiv successful isn't 
even known to the companx at this 
point. "It's too earl\ for all the re- 
turns to be in.'" says Fechheimer. And 
President Fink, who figures they'll 
never know the full story because 
'"we'll keep on getting continuing re- 
sults from this one promotion." 

There are some specifics which point 
to success, however. Pink says these 
results may be unauthoritative in terms 
of usual research, but he considers 
them mightily significant. For exam- 
ple, one evening he and a party of 
guests tried to get into one of San 
Francisco's most popular dining spots. 
They were told they had to wait. One 
of his guests mentioned Pink's busi- 
ness association, at which point the 
head waiter commented on the Treas- 
ure Hunt — and seated the party. 

Pink, speaking to the bedding buyer 
at one of San Francisco's biggest de- 
partment stores, asked him how the 
campaign had done. The repl\ ran 





Strongest push was on radio, around-the-clock schedules on San 
■ ■ Francisco's independent KSFO, for $8,000 hidden treasure hunt 



NAME STORE 



Follow-through included newspaper ad keyed to 
Red-Line theme, tie-in with Jerry Colonna commercials 



44 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1957 



something like ilii-: "I real!) can'l 
trace .1 single specific sale to the adver- 
tising . . . but I had to re-order three 
times in iimc week! Ihi- retailei ran 

OUt "I maps dm (lie fir-t da\ of the 

1 . rite — . t demand was so hea> j 

In the fourth week of the contest, 
when one of the 11,000 drafts was con- 
cealed in a public park, some 3,500 
people overran a different park and 
trampled Bowers and bushes in the 
process. The park director enlisted 
the cooperation ol Englander, which in 
tuin called in the state police to dis- 
perse the crowd. \ml the sponsor took 
to the air immediately with a fa>t cop) 
change alerting people thai the draft 
was in a park l»ut nol that one. 

Richard \\ , Gin in, advertising 
director <>f the company, says this 
type i>f flexibility was one of the big 
factors in the selection of radio as the 
basic medium. "V\ e like. I the idea 
that we could switch cop) fast, and. 
of course, we wanted the broadest pos- 
sible coverage at a favorable cost." 

To put impact behind thai coverage, 
l.n-lander chose a well known person- 
alis with a voice which could he iden- 
tified l>\ the listener Jerr) Colonna. 

Colonna transcribed an intro to all 



live commercials, stressing the Red 

Line theme |.\ urging listeners to fol- 
low the led line | on the map ' to the 
Hidden Treasure. I hen a h\ i K.H t I 

personalit) gave details on . lues. 

I he five goals w hii h were a< hie> ed 
can probabl) he summarized in one 
woid aw areness. < ionsumei s, foi 
ample, are less aw are ol theii need foi 
a bed than the) an- of the more 
"show) features of theii home, 1 
Pink. "Visitors don't normall) seethe 
bed, itself, because it's covered and 
people tend to buj that which an out- 
sidei can Bee at a quick glance." 

\ml the retail salesmen often need 
to be reminded thai the) can ^>-t biggei 
sales volume and greatei consumer 
satisfaction b) showing bettei qualit) 

items rather than h\ pushing Onl) the 

lower-priced promotional numbers a 
-tore ma) advertise to bring in traffic, 
says Pink. 

Englander's advertising not onl) 
presents the fact- about Red-Line, 
r.njilander's exclusive construction fea- 
ture, hut also sells hs creating a feeling 
or a mood that reflects the high qualit) 
of the Englander products, Bays Fech- 
heimer. The mood which Englandei 

attempts to establish is one of rest and 





Results "f month-long promotion show hypoed Bales, more dealer outlets, addi- 
tional retail floor -pace. -a\- W illiam Land (1), re::. -1-. in<zr.. with a $1,000 winner 



Pres. |; ■ Pit • V.P. I open 

up din 



relaxation. I he thei • used in 

print and t\ advertising i- "Sleep on 
an I nglandei Red-1 ine as relaxed as 
\ on sleep on a i a< at ion." 

Resean h has indi< ated that people 
natural!) assoi iate i ai itions h ith 
deep, relaxing, restful Bleep "the type 
of -leep \ou u'ct on the Englander Red- 
Line mattress and bos spring," accord- 
ing to Hint Goodman, assistant adver- 
tising director of the company. That's 
wh) the Englander advertising u 
people to enjo) i a< ation Bleep not just 
two weeks of the veai but all yeai Ion-. 

T\ pick- up thi- same theme, and 

pegs it to a demonstration. 

Programing and announcements 

purchased on a -pot basis are now the 
major advertising effort, with I ng- 
lander swinging into it- new. more in- 
tensive 52-week t\ stride last January. 
Some of the relaxation and vacation 
themes are don.- all live, and other- are 
handled partiall) on film with on- 
camera lead-in- b) an announcer. 

Other media purchased b) the com- 
pany, under the direction of ( hail<- 
Lappen, vice president in charge of ad- 
vertising and public relation-, are ra- 
dio, local newspapers, magazines and 
billboards. T\ gets the weight, in 
ter m- of dollars, sa) - the a< i ounl su- 
pervisor, with radio being used in 
quantit) for such spe ial promotion 

event- a- the li.-.i-uie Hunt. 

The compan) operates I I manufac- 
turing plant- throughout the <o| jn tr\. 

with shipments to dealers from these 

various point-. Selling i- rdinated 

b) \. B. Staeblar, vice president in 
charge of sales, and advertising b) 

ad director t Jin in. 

The) and other client and agent \ ex- 
ecutives are working on a final adver- 
tising equation for thi- selling era. 
One of the decisions they're expected 

to make, on the basis of the "-an r ran- 
. isco radio re-ult-. i- whether thi- type 

of saturation frequency with an excit- 
ing COD) theme can be a pattern adapt- 
able to am other I . S. market. ^ 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



4-1 




MEDAL 

Lincoln commercial was impressive for its new approach to an 
old, old story. Working with optical effects this version gave 
excitement to the visual presentation of an auto. Agency: J. 
Walter Thompson. Story and design: C. Jenkyns, S. Sturtevant 




MEDAL 

Animated commercial for Ford was chosen for its effective com- 
bination of animation, simplicity and mood in a fresh version of 
the humorous sell. Agency: Young & Rubicam. Producer-direc- 
tor: William S. Myskens. Art director: Stephen 0. Frankfort 



E WINN ERS 



Art Directors Club chooses top commercials of 1956. The criteria: 
does it have that "forward look?" Big winners: Lincoln and Ford 



^^ries of "Art for art's sake" and "It's pretty, but can it 
sell?" ring out each year about now. They greet the annual 
New York Art Directors Show, held this year 27 May-12 
June at the Waldorf. These charges stem from a basic con- 
fusion about the awards which cover all visual phases of 
advertising for the past year. 

The show's chairman, Arnold Roston of Grey Advertising, 
told SPONSOR the awards are "designed to elevate visual 
creative standards" — and creative is the key word. In the 
case of something as complex as a tv commercial, it's hard 
to peg the criteria. But this is the committee's approach. 

"We've chosen commercials that find a new solution to 
visual problems, or a new creative approach which offers a 
point of departure for the future,"' says Roston. "This for- 
ward look is vitally important to a medium changing as 
rapidly as television." 

This year animation is still riding high but, according to 
Ed Bennett of NBC and chairman of the tv committee, live 
action commercials (such as Prudential Insurance. RCA 



tv sets and Lincoln I were the most exciting taken as a group. 

Bennett admits that in many cases the award might well 
go to the producer, director or copywriter in addition to the 
art director. "But." he adds "we are an art director's club. 
Although we are many times extremely impressed by the 
copy, the animation, or the camera techniques, all we can do 
is assume that the art director has made a substantial con- 
tribution to the final product. 

The tv judges were: Robert C. McKichan, NBC; John K. 
Hubley. Storyboard Inc.; Jack Sidebotham. Y&R; Norman 
Tate. Aver; Ralph Koch, K&W Film: Victor Sandak, Color 
Illustration Inc.; William Duffy. ME; Christ Ishi, UPA; 
Louis Dorfsman, CBS: Ra\ Lind. B&B: Norman Mullen- 
dore, SSCB; Larry Parker. K\E: and Andy Ross. ABC. 

Award winning tv commercials are pictured on these 
pages. Additional tv awards I not shown i were received by 
CBS for a newspaper ad: NBC for a two-page, color maga- 
zine ad; NBC for a direct mail booklet, and NBC for a title 
card for its opera series. ^ 



16 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




MERIT AWARD 

Sincerity was conveyed !>\ ilii- realistic commercial for I'm 
dential Insurance. The Btraighl presentation avoided "slick- 
ness," captured a child-like simplicity. Agency: ('alkins & 
Holden. Photographer: Mike Elliot \ii director: Leslie Silvas 




I 



MERIT AWARD 
I lii- drawing Btyle in itii- Jell-0 commercial and ii- \ i-u.il 
interpretation "f the < ■ •[>> theme were outstanding. Ho 
anothei successful, simple approach. I • 
Rubicam. Artist: Maurice Sendak. \ri din 




MERIT AWARD 

The animated visualization of the copy theme in this Maypo 
Cereal commercial was exceptional. This presentation was a 
good example of the successful sofl sell approach in animation. 
The agency: Bryan Houston. The art director: John Hublej 




MERIT AWARD 

Floating t\ sel commercial foi Rl \ ive f"r ii- 

standing camera-work and special opti 

was done in color. Vgency: Kenyon & Eckhardl iphy : 

Warner Bros. Producei Hal Mathews. \rt .: 




Merit Award: Tv editorial art. Art 
director: Edward Bennett. NBC. Art- 
ist: Guv Fraumeni. Adver.: Hallmark 




Merit Award: Booklet, direct mail. 

Art director: Irving Miller. Arti~t: 
Robert Osbora. Advertiser: WTOP 



Merit Award: ri promotional 
di- . \rt director and arti-t : (ieorge 
Olden. Advertiser: ' BS Television 



THE TIMEBUYING TEAM 

SPONSOR traces a spot buy step-by-step at Cunningham & Walsh to show 
how a buying team functions. The campaign: Texaco's "Tower of Power" 



^%hu<>st everyone, even dolly push- 
ers and turntable men. knows what a 
timebuyer does. It's self-evident: the 
timebuyer buys time. 

How he buys it, and the sequence of 
intra-agency events leading up to the 
purchase, are other matters entirely. 
It's in this realm that even the adver- 
tising pros begin to bog down. 

Everyone knows such terms as "call- 
ing the rep for availabilities," "work- 
ing up estimates." "delivering make- 
goods." But how many sponsors and 
how many account people and station 
people really get the big picture of the 
timebuying team at work? sponsor 



suspects that many tend to think of a 
timebuying team as a sort of semi- 
human Univac: You put in an order, 
the machine rumbles a bit and out 
come 139,452 commercial impressions 
at a cost of 98tf per 1,000 (undupli- 
cated, yet ) . 

The facts of timebuying life aren't 
quite this simple. The purchase of a 
single spot announcement — if such a 
thing were ever done — would bring in- 
to play as many as 12 different peo- 
ple. Multiply this single announce- 
ment by thousands I the usual case), 
complicate it further with sundry cli- 
ent, agency, representative and station 



personnel, and you have a vast breed- 
ing ground for potential confusion and 
error. 

Cunningham & Walsh, New York 
City. ( it also has divisions in Chicago, 
Los Angeles and San Francisco I . is 
t\pical of most medium to larger sized 
agencies in the way it buys time — but 
perhaps atypical because it maintains 
a continuous review of its procedures 
From its review have come new tech 
niques which cut through paperwork 

This is why sponsor traced, step by 
step, an actual spot purchase at C&Y\ 
With few variations, these steps are the 
same used by any buyer and his team 



How the C&W buying group divides media responsibility 




The Texaco team: Newman F. | 
McEvoy (seated) is v.p. and | 
media supervisor on all accounts, j 
He contributes to agency and | 
client plans meetings, supervises 1 
all media decisions, funnels spe- 1 
cific tasks to his department's j 
specialists (at right) who de- | 
velop the actual buying blue- 1 
print. Some steps in the buy- | 
ing technique overlap: others 1 
are exclusive with one person. j 
But the team coordinates the | 
buying effort and tries strenu- 1 
ously to cut down paper work 1 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll: 




MEDIA SUPERVISE 

John l.ucinatelli superv — 
media buying for eight clit 1 ) 
with emphasis on Tex I 



tui ,iii\ type oi SponSO] w i 1 1 1 an\ -i/e 

budget. 

"The freei the buyei is "I detail, 
computations, sheafs of papers and 

data, the i e time be has to think 

ami to ;n i intelligent!) . \ml the moi e 
time he has t" think, the more effec- 
tive his buys will be." So Bays Jeremj 
Sprague, (\\\ group timebuying su- 
I n - 1 \ i — . . i assigned to Texaco, the client 
whose -.[k.i campaign sponsor traced. 
\ heav) user nl -|»>t radio and t\. 
rexaco distributes it- gasolines, lubri- 
cants, anti-freeze and othei products 
in IJI states. Mosl ol its broadcast ad- 
vertising pushes >k\ Chief, Fire I hie! 
and Skj Chief Su-preme gasolines. Its 
1957 broadcast pattern is foui five- 
week campaigns annually, each cover- 
ing approximate^ LOO markets. Four 
of them include both t\ and radio 
land newspaper is integrated); one, 
in the summer includes, radio only. 

Hie decision to !>uil«l around five 
four-week campaigns stems from tin- 
toil level at the agencj and client. 

I'hr agenc) planners include: Bill 
Mulvt 1 ). senior vice president; John 
Childs, account executive; Malcolm 



Mini. i . assistant a ml exei ul 

New man McEvoy, h .. \ ,p and media 
din', toi : John I in inatelli, medi i group 
supervisoi who spends most oi his tinrn 
on the lexai o act ounl and -n \ es in a 
consulting i apacit) on othei a< i ounts . 
Spi ague; • leorge ( den. manage) mai 
keting resean h ; Ken I (ulsell, mana 
merchandising ; lack < Iregoi ) . 
promotion manager. 

III.- client planners : S. C. Bai tlett, 
\ ice president in chai ge ol domestii 
Bales; Bail Hawke, general Bales man 
agei : Donald Stewart, advertising man 
ager; James Coogan, assistant man- 
age! "I advertising. Working with this 
planning group, oi course, are market- 
ers, researchers and cop) people. 

I hese men also la) dow n the basic 
media plan. 

Iii radio: 100 markets; three to 
four stations per market: transcribed 
minutes larger) during the peak traffic 
pi riods from 7 to 9 a.m.; 1 to 7 p.m.; 

weekend,-: a mo delate Saturation fre- 

quenc) expanded during introductory 
flights; five four-week campaigns dur- 
ing the year. 

In television: approximate!) ion 



irkets; an ol two stations 

irki filmed minutes and 

■ n nighttime pei 

moderate laturation; foui foui 
campai ni durii thi 

I August Octobei 

i. oi- with radio 

Step I . I he m. dia group all... at. - 
the mai t ■ i k . -i broadi asl bu 

on the basis of a weighted f..i mula 
one which is based on sales, district l>\ 
distj it i throughout th< I S foi the 
pre\ ioufi yeai , Marl eU in rank* d in 
ordei ••! impoi tarn i to rexaco based 
on this foi mula. Markets, in turn 
broken down on the basis o! sales 
n gions I North, South Pai ifi< i 

ami b) Bales divisions within these 
territoi ies. I hen the) are ranked b) 
markets within these divisions. 

St«'|» 2. I In- market h-i then j 
to bu) ei Ja<k Bra) . w ho pencils a!< 
side eat h cit) i I i the < all lettei - oi the 
three or foui Btations he plans to use 
in each one and (2) the representa- 
tive for each of these Btations. 

I low doe- he -elci t the -tali. m- '. 







> 




YING SUPERVISOR 

eremy Sprague as-i-ts media 

upervisor on radio, tv plan- 

I hing. supervises buying, budget 



TIMEBUYER 

Jack Bray does actual buying, 
supervises the estimating and 

watches all broadcast budgets 



ESTIMATOR 

\1 Qererdon contact- the -ta- 
tion reps, supplies coal data 
and estimates to the client 



SECRETARY 

Elaine Nirenberg handle, de- 
tails, -end- merchandi-ing let- 
ter-, follow- through on w.«rk 



Three Big Steps In 
Texaco Timebuying 




Man from C&W, John Lucinatelli (1.) 
sees how Texaco station operates. He is me- 
dia supervisor, works mainly for this client 







Pivot points in any spot buy are buyer 
and rep. Jack Bray (1.) goes over rates 
with Ralph Glaser, CBS Radio Spot Sales 




Tower of Power pump topper is checked 

John Child? (1.) C&W account exec; 

\i'\. asst. sis. prom. mgr. for Texaco 



■"I'm a Pulse bu)er.'" Bra\ says, "and 
I examine each market according to 
the Pulse quarter-hour ratings for the 
time periods in which we're interested. 
Occasionally I compare markets in 
relation to the Hooper report and pick 
up isolated cases of fieak ratings as a 
safety measure. I look at the time seg- 
ments in radio, not the specific times — 
the periods from 7 to 9 a.m., 4 to 7 
p.m. and on weekends. ' 

He lists these top-rated stations as a 
guide for further refinement in his 
selection. Then he looks at the pro- 
graming to see if its character matches 
the needs of the client. "I suallv. they 
go hand in hand."' he says, but some- 
times a top-rated show will have an 
audience which Texaco doesn't want. 
It likes to reach a heavy male audience, 
which is why it avoids women in day- 
time hours and teen-agers. 

Because "ratings are a guide rather 
than a governor." Bray combines in 
his own mind the tangibles of rating 
and share of audience with the intangi- 
bles of station standing, prestige, iden- 
tification in its own communis, qual- 
ity in programing. These are the 
factors which a station reuresentative 
'"sells" to the buyer, "and all selling bv 
the rep should be done bettveen buying 
periods for the agency." So says Brav. 
who adds. "To the degree that we have 
been sold on a station before Ave start 
buying, we are pre-sold on a station 
list before making it up in final form. 
In essence, our stations are pre-selected 
before we even begin to compare costs 
and coverage. This is why it is the 
responsibility of the representative to 
see us only before we start buying. 
never while we are. and to tell us the 
up-to-date story of his station and his 
market." 

This up-to-date story should include 
all relevant facts about the listening 
audience, a change in station manage- 
ment or facilities, addition of new lo- 
cal personalities, a revamp of the 
broadcast format, the influx of new 
people, construction of new plants and 
businesses. 

These are things the buyer keeps in 
mind — and. again, if his mind is like a 
sieve he can't be a good buyer. He re- 
members these elements when he com- 
piles this list — and woe to the rep who 
doesn't bother to brief the buyer on 
these basics. 

Step 3. When the buyer has com- 
piled this first list of the four top sta- 
tions in each of 100 markets and the 



four reps involved, he turns this over 
to the estimator with instructions on 
what kind of availabilities are needed. 
The estimator (Al Cleverdon or 
Ethel Melcher) then calls each rep on 
the list, telling them starting and clos- 
ing dates, the scope of the buy, times 
preferred. Most reps know their ac- 
counts well so they have a good con- 
cept of what the client wants without 
too much spelling out from the esti- 
mator. If there are questions, the rep 
calls the buyer. Otherwise, the rep 
takes the information from the estima- 
tor and starts to check his stations as 
to what time periods are available. 

Step 4. It takes two or three days 
for the rep to get back to the buyer 
with a typed li-t of availabilities. 
W hen all the sheets come in (and these 
can he typed lists or program logs with 
Lme periods circled in red pencil I. the 
buyer will have between 300 and 400 
different availability sheets. 

The bu\er at this juncture does not 
see the rep; sheets are delivered to a 
receptionist either by the rep or a mes- 
senger. "This is the precious period of 
buying," savs Brav. "when we have no 
lime to see anyone. The way yve buy 
in this pre-selected way, the rep knows 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

How does a timebuying team really 
work on a spot campaign in an agency? 
Cunningham & Walsh gives a step-by- 
step answer to what happens between 
the time Texaco decides on an air 
campaign and the time it goes on tv 
and radio. Each step is geared to one 
: dea: how to cut down on paper work. 

pretty well I wouldn't have had him 
called in the first place if we weren't 
pretty sure we'd buy what he had to 
offer. This means he isn't bogged 
down bv a lot of paper work for the 
buver who is just scouting rather than 
actually planning to buy that specific 
station. This eliminates a lot of un- 
necessary detail for them and for us. 

Step 5. While the buyer is waiting 
for availability sheets to come in from 
the reps, he's lining up market budgets. 
He already has a market-by-market 
budget allocation. Now his task is to 
make up a station-by-station budget 
allotment within each of those 100 
markets. 

Here's where his dollar research 
starts. He checks published station 
{Please turn to page 52 I 



50 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




TENNESSEE 




BIRMINGHAM 

Announces 

ihv Appointment of 

HENRY I. CHRISTAL < 

National Sales Representatives 



Effective June 1st 




Mi.iMit. of tk. «.r. ii 

U...1... Station 



\- one of America's pioneer stations, \\ AIM takes pride in be- 
coming associated, through distinguished representation, with 
these leadership stations: 



WBAL— Baltimore 
WBEN— Buffalo 
WCAR— Cleveland 
WjR— Detroit 
WTIC— Hartford 
WDAF— Kansas City 
KFI — Los Angeles 



WHAS— Louisville 
WCKR— Miami 
WTMJ— Milwaukee 
WHAM— Rochester 
WCY — Schenectady 
WSYR— Syracuse 
WTAC— Worcester 



WAPI 



NBC 



10,000 Watts Clear Channel 1070 KC 
The Voice of Alabama 




FLORIDA 



6A 



TIMEBUYING TEAM 

(Continued from page 50) 

rates to find the special package prices 
■ Hi red because he's using a saturation 
frequency which will earn him special 
package discounts. He checks each of 
the stations on his original list, re- 
tailoring and further refining the list 
as he goes along. He knows he wants 
announcements in Cleveland, for ex- 
ample. He has four stations on his 
Cleveland list. But maybe one of these 
four doesn't offer special package 
rates. So he might cut off this station 
and divide the announcements allo- 
cated among the other three. Or he 
may keep all four, but divide the 
weight unevenly. 

His station list, with actual costs and 
frequencies, is read\ to be correlated 
with the rep"s list as it comes in. 

Step 6. The availability sheets are 
in from the reps, and now the buyer 
is ready to bin. He buys a market as 
its availability sheet becomes complete. 
The first market for which all reps 
have submitted availabilities may be 
Houston, so Houston is the first city 
to be bought. 

This "is the moment of truth," as 



Bray puts it. "Here's where the rep 
may lose out, perhaps because he 
hasn't presented us with the kind of 
package we want." 

The buyer then lists, station by sta- 
tion, city by city, what he plans to or- 
der. He continues to weight the bal- 
ances, taking into account how nearly 
the time periods submitted to him 
match what he wants, the reputation of 
the station, the costs. But he con- 
tinues to think of time segments I 7 to 
9 a.m.) rather than individual times 
to avoid further complications in such 
realms as make-goods and cancella- 
tions. 

Step 7. The buyer telephones each 
rep and places the order, aided in this 
lengthy task by the estimator or the 
assistant buyer. The list, at this point, 
is lined up according to reps rather 
than by markets. The rep's job now 
is to go to his stations to see if they 
can clear the times which the buyer 
has ordered. 

Step 8. While the agency waits for 
time clearances, the estimator draws 
up estimate pages for each station on 
this basic list. This is a nine-bv-12 
inch sheet of paper which carries top 



it's KSAN in San Francisco ^j| 

PROVEN MOST POPULAR WITH NEGRO LISTENERS 
YEAR AFTER YEAR* ,-n .,., ^ 


1 [Wilvl 


A \ \U§ RICHMOND 




■ »^r ■ ■ ■ m 

Is Your 
Best Buy... 
Because 


N\_^} \^m OAKLAND B^ 


A Where 


1 * ^ *♦ 




Wmfm 


'"••■■J ^ I •••• 

\\ V V *• 
1 ^^ 


fc\ Negro 
ii / Market 
Nils! 


IMI 


Goes Where 
280,000 

& i 


\ SAN JOSE ^m 


\ IV ■ 


MA A J !■ 


\ 

/ •• •" M 


Listeners 


• 


»_. •»• * # _|| I/O I II _!.-- A- ■* '■ - 


WRIT 

1111 MAR 


for specific proof of all KSAN elf 
intact Stars National, Tracy Moon 

E, WIRE, PHONE KSAN 

KET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF0RNI 


Jin 
M 

A, 


is 10 rame, 
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MA 1-8171 



headings (state, city, station, watts, 
affiliation, etc.) and a bottom section 
for detail (number of announcements 
weekly, length, rate earned, billing, re- 
bate and net). It's the top part which 
is filled in at this point, with the detail 
scheduled later as confirmations come 
in from reps. 

Step 9. The estimator forwards 
this incidental information on client, 
station, city and commercial to the 
traffic department. Traffic processes 
the list to (1) the shipping room, 
which makes up a shipping list of sta- 
tions to which commercials should be 
sent, and to (2) copy, which in Tex- 
aco's case sees that 100 e.t.'s of the 
"Texaco Tower of Power" commercial 
are available for shipment. (Danger: 
In some agencies the time periods are 
bought but sometimes someone some- 
where along the line forgets to send 
out the transcriptions or the film to the 
stations. I 



Step 10. The reps call back with 
confirmations on the orders. If they 
can't confirm, they make an alternate 
suggestion. In almost all cases, the 
buyer right then and there decides 
what he will buy as a replacement and 
the wheels get back into motion fast. 
After the phoned confirmation, the 
buyer marks his availability sheet as 
finalized. He sends it to the estimator, 
who fills in the bottom portion of the 
estimate page with detail as to quan- 
tity and cost. 

The estimator generally works one 
day behind the buyer, taking finished 
station sheets from the buyer, entering 
the basic information on the estimate 
sheets and turning this finished prod- 
uct over to the typing pool. The typing 
pool proofreads its own typed sheets 
and runs off the final version for each 
station on a multilith machine — 25 
copies of each. I Thus, some 400 indi- 
vidual station sheets are printed in 
quantities of 25. making some 10,000 
sheets which have to be collated.) 

These collated sections are distrib- 
uted to the client, who always gets one 
before the start of any campaign, and 
within the agency's media and account 
groups. 

Step 11. Station representatives 
send in typed confirmations of the or- 
ders placed by phone. Cunningham & 
Walsh is probably unique among agen- 
cies in having simplified this portion 






SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




fa a^y^yi^y & ^ { A.ty 



How well do you know the Boston market ? 



Mention Boston and some people 
think only of Back Bay, Beacon 
Hill and Baked Beans. But for 
others, the greater Boston area 
means much more. What do the 
above pictures mean for you? 

A. Antique hunting decoys. On display in 
historic Sturbridge Village. 

B. Terracotta Statuette from Cyprus. 
7th Century B.C., Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts. 

C. Altar in Jewish Chapel. Brandeis Uni- 
versity, Waltham, Mass. 

D. Lou Webster. WEEI's popular Farm 
Editor (at age four^ . 

E.Indian Signature ( original Boston 
resident . 

F. A half-kite, half-balloon: otherwise 
called a "sky hook." Manufactured in 
Cambridge. Mass. 



G. A rare New England tavern signboard. 
H. Iron ring on Weld Boathousc. Harvard. 
I. Swan boat in Public Gardens' Pond, 
a favorite tourist attraction in Boston. 
J. South Polar Camp of Rear Admiral 
Byrd. who died recently in Boston. 
K. Note pinned to infant abandoned in 
Cadillac outside Boston hospital. 

For those who advertise in Boston. 
WEEI has a special meaning: it 
knows the Boston market. This 
means an advertiser can depend on 
WEEI's knowledge for the most ef- 
fective product campaign in Boston. 
But if WEEI knows the Boston mar- 
ket, so do Bostonians know WEEI. 
WEEI leads all of its competitors, 
both network and independent, m 



audience penetration. On a total 
week basis. WEEI reaches more than 
8 1 °'„ of the radio homes in the Boston 
area.* When you want your product 
to mean something special in the 
Boston market, call CBS Radio Spot 
Sales or WEEI Radio. 



Credit* EG — State Trust Co.. Boston. F — 
Dewey & Alrrty Chemical Co.. Cambridge. 
•Source: 5-County Boston Pulse area. PuUe 
CPA Report. November, 1956. 



WEEI 



of thi papei \Miik. too. It asks reps 
to send in a copy of each confirmation 
in triplicate, and this serves as the 
broadcast order as well as the legal 
contract. 

The buyer checks each typed con- 
firmation against his estimate sheets. 
When the) agree exactly (which is most 
<>f the time because it's the rep who 
processes the written confirmation im- 
mediately after the telephoned confir- 
mation), he signs each of the three 
copies. One goes back to the rep as the 
legal broadcast order; one to the bill- 
ing department; the third to the e ti- 
mator for the master file. 

\ rep's confirmations "are almost 
al\\a\s letter perfect." says Bray, "be- 
cause his office types the order within 
a few minutes after his confirming 
with n- b\ telephone. It's an almost 
foolproof system, and avoids all the 
mishmashing and back-and-forth add- 
ing and revising which most agencies 
and reps have to contend with." 

\t this point, the buying is finished. 
But there are main more duties for the 
timebuying team. 

Step 12. The buyer now checks an- 
swers from the station reps to a letter 



sent a week earlier. The letter, sent b) 
secretary blame \irenberg over the 
signature of one of the bu\ing execu- 
tive-, requests merchandising coopera- 
tion f 1 1 »m representatives and their sta- 
tions. It asks the rep what he is pre- 
pared to do to help push the success 
of the campaign locally. The buyer 
look- at these letters and makes a pre- 
liminar) merchandising summary for 
the client. 

Step 13. This final step can be 
main steps because it involves follow - 
up acti\ it\ of main kinds. 

In Texacos case, tins post-buying 
period includes a detailed analysis of a 
few selected bu\s in markets where the 
client has a special interest. This de- 
tail breaks down into market data, po- 
tential listeners, costs per person and 
impression, estimated duplication in 
audience. 

Sometimes further station list tailor- 
ing is called for. Maybe San Francisco 
needs heavier saturation, although the 
actual buy fits the plan prescribed orig- 
inally. "Spot, with its flexibility adapts 
to am kind of last-minute changes at 
this point." sa\s Jerr\ Sprague. "The 
client may call for a cutback, an e::te 1- 

















/ 






fh 























*l\W ^ 


»' 

..." 












<^^?S=^ 






) ( 


V 










/ 


If you buy by ratings alone, we've got 
'em ... 38 of the 41 top Pulse-rated shows. 
We have the greatest number of listeners 
in mid-Ohio, and they have $2,739,749,000 
to spend. They and Pulse also place us 




first in any Monday-thru-Friday quarter- 
hour, day or night. Ask John Blair. 

WBNS RADIO 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 







sion or an addition — and spot can do 
all of these quick!) ." 

Other post-buying responsibilities 
include a follow-up to the actual air 
campaign, continual refinements of the 
-i hedule. compilation of the final mer- 
chandising report, correlation of the 
field reports and actual sales figures 
with the marketing pattern for broad- 
casting, plans meetings for the next 
campaign with the client and various 
departments of the agency. 

But this rundown covers only the 
radio portion of the combination tv- 
radio purchase. As the actual radio 
buying comes to an end, the timebuy- 
ing team begins the chain of events 
which lead to an on-the-air tv schedule. 

I hen the tv spot campaign bu\ing 
is begun. 

The procedure in television is the 
same as with radio, with a few varia- 
tions. Tv always is bought after the 
radio schedule. McEvo\ explains, be- 
cause ""it takes more perusing, the 
nightttime periods we want are more 
difficult to come b) and this portion of 
the campaign costs a lot more money. 

"We buy as close to the starting date 
as possible, to avoid conflicts between 
what we ask for and what we can get. 
Another variation: in television we 
don t buy spans of time as we do in 
radio. In tv we buy a specific time. 
And in tv there's less time involved in 
compiling a station list becau-e most 
markets have onl\ two stations and we 
buy both of them. 

"In tv, we're primarily interested in 
the rating, the share of audience and 
audience composition, because, we're 
bu\ing adjacencies. We don't check 
the programing as closely as we do 
in radio, where we're more interested 
in coverage and the job a station 
does," sa\s the media director. 

Otherwise, the tv spot campaign fol- 
lows the step-by-step tactic of the 
radio drive. The team — the media 
director, media supervisor. bu\ ing su- 
pervisor, buyer, estimator and secre- 
tary — carry on these various over- 
lapping, parallel functions simultane- 
ously on all of the radio and tv ac- 
counts. 

This pattern is one which every 
agenc) uses to tailor its spot cam- 
paigns. Refinements in any purchase 
are dictated by the individualit) of the 
agency and client, as in this summar) 
of Cunningham \ \\ alsb and Texaco 
activity. But the physical procedures 
remain the same — all aimed at the 
objective of better buying. ^ 



54 



SPONSOR 



18 MAY 1957 





Radio WOW ~< WOW-TV Omaha 







n 



3 1\ ^ 




Third PEABODY Honor! 

1940 Citation for Polio 
Fund Drive. 

1946 "Operation Big 
Muddy." 

1956 "Regimented Rain- 
drops" — soil-water con- 
servation." 



FOR WINNING 
k THE YEARS 

■ MOST COVETED 

■ PUBLIC SERVICE 
AWARD 



The entire Meredith Radio-TV Family 
congratulates WOW Radio and WOW-TY for 
winning the 1956 Peahody Public Service Award. 

Your TY film and Radio Program Series — 
"Regimented Raindrops" was a vital story, 
masterfully presented ! 




WHEN -sTMcusi- WHEN-TV 
K PH0 _ phoen.x _ KPHO-TV 
KCMO -«*»*" ™-KCM0-TV 



Meredith Stations are affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



Here's all you need to know- 



T H 



E BUFFALO EVENING N E >W S STfcT\ON 



WBEN 






in Buffalo! 



The second biggest market in the 
nation's biggest-spending state is defined 
and digested for you in the new WBEN-TV 
Coverage Brochure. 

This brochure includes market facts 
of the 14 Western New York and four 
Northwestern Pennsylvania counties served 
by WBEN-TV. It also contains a graphic 
coverage map that pin points your total 
sales area where 3V2 billions are spent 
annually at the retail level. In all, it pre- 
sents a clear and concise picture of all you 



WB EN-TV 



need to know to stimulate sales thinking 
and sales effort. 

And to help you reach and penetrate 
this huge market the most effective way, 
you'll find this brochure brimming with 
facts on facilities and service that have 
proven to TV advertisers since 1948 that 
"TV dollars count for more on Channel 4". 

We'll be happy to send you a copy of 
this fact-packed brochure. Just write our 
Sales Department. 






channel 
CBS in lufffalo 



4 




THE PIONEER STATION OF WESTERN 



VO R K 



56 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




I.h li^iui. ni , hai 
in tin advertising ami broadcast fields 



NEW AND REN 



NEW ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

American Dairy, Chi 
American Home Products. NY 
Buick. Flint. Mich 
Bulova. Flushing NY 
Hclene Curtis. Chi 
Gillette, Boston 
Cillette. Boston 
Knomark. Brooklyn 
Lever Bros. NY 
Schick. Lancaster, Pa 
Sylvania Electric Products. NY 
Timcx. NY 



AGENCY 

Campbell Mithun. Chi 
8atcs, NY 
Kudner. NY 
Mc-E. NY 
Ludgin, Chi 
Maxon, Detroit 
Maxon. Detroit 
E Mosul. NY 
BBDO. NY 

Warwick & Legler. NY 
JWT, NY 
Peck, NY 



Toni. Chi 



North, Chi 



STATIONS 


NBC 


144 


CBS 


133 


NRC 


120 


NBC 


130 


CBS 


133 


CBS 


200 


CBS 


200 


NBC 


144 


NBC 


128 


NBC 




ABC 




NRC 




NBC 


168 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Perry Como; alt Sa 8-9 pm ; 'j spon; l-S 

SRO Playhous. . alt Si 9.30-10 pm; II May 35 wks 

Wells Fargo; lit M 8:30-9 pm ; 9 Sept. 52 

Steve Allen; Su 8-9 pm ; ' 3 spon ; 19 May 2 |un. only 

SRO Playhouse; alt Sa 9:30-10 pm; 18 ■■ 

Prcakncss; Sa. 5:30-6 pm; 18 May only 

Belmont; Sa 4 30-5 pm; 15 |une only 

Perry Como: alt Sa 8-9 pm. '] spon 14 Sop! 

Life of Riley, alt F 8:30-9 pm ; 14 June, 65 wks 

Cisclc MacKenzie; alt Sa 9:30-10 pm; 5 Oct 52 wks 

The Real McCoys; Th 8:30-9 pm ; 3 Oct; 52 wks 

Bob Hope Variety Show; 6 one-hour programs fall 

1958 season 
Your Hit Parade: alt Sa 10:30-11 pm; 7 Sept. 52 wks 



1957- 



RENEWED ON TELEVISION NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

American Home Products, NY 

American Tobacco, NY 

Crcyhound. Chi 

Kimberly-Clark, Chi 

Noxzcma Chemical. Bait 

RCA. Camden. N| & Whirlpool Corp, 

St Joseph. Mich 
R. |. Reynolds. Winston-Salem 
Sunbeam Corp, Chi 
Toni, Chi 



AGENCY 



Bates. NY 



BBDO, NY 


Crey, NY 


FC&B. Chi 


SSC&B. NY 


Kf,F NY r, Chi 
Esty. NY 




Pcrrin-Paus, Chi 


North, Chi 



STATIONS 
CBS 182 



NBC 168 


NBC 130 


NBC 144 


NBC 144 


NBC 144 




NBC 139 


NBC 144 


NBC 139 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 

Name That Tunc, alt Tu 7:30-8 pm: 7 May; 26 wks 
Your Hit Parade; alt Sa 10 30-11 pm ; 7 Sept: 52 wks 
Steve Allen; alt Su 8-9 pm ; ' 2 spon; 14 July; 52 wks 
Perry Como; alt Sa 8-9 pm; > 3 spon: 14 Sept 
Perry Como; alt Sa 8-9 pm ; '3 spon; 14 Sept 

Perry Como; alt Sa 8-9 pm: '3 spon; 14 Sept 
People Arc Funny; alt Sa 7 30-8 pm ; 14 Sept 52 wks 
Perry Como; alt Sa 8-9 pm; '3 spon; 14 Sept 
People Are Funny; alt Sa 7:30-8 pm; 21 Sept; 52 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 

Arthur C. Arnold 
John Bibcock 
Ccrtrude V. Casey 
Frank Crosiar 
George DeMartini 
William Du Bois 
Stanley Dudelson 

Don R. Cilhes 

Robert R. Hansen 
Al Hazelwood 
Adolf N. Hult 
jack Kcttell 
Nox Lempert 
Alfred Lewis 
Dick Lewis 
Allen Ludden 
Walter J. Minn. Jr. 

Bob Mansur 
David Mathews 
Bruce Mayer 
Theodore A. Mindc 
H. D Neuwirth 
Patric Rastall 
Joseph Savalli 
Bill Simpson 
Cr 1 f f in B. Thompson 

William R. Vallee 
William K Wintcrble 



FORMER AFFILIATION NEW AFFILIATION 

National Tea Co. Minn, asst store mgr WCCO-TV, Minn-St Paul, asst dir mcrch dept 

Crosley Broadcasting, asst gen program mgr WLW-I, Indianapolis, asst gen mgr 

Transfilm. NY, sis Same, mgr sis dept 

WNDU, South Bend, local sis WMRI. Marion, Ind. commercial mgr 

Cohen. Simonson & Co. NY. gen partner Cuild Films. NY, vp & treasurer 

_. Scars Roebuck, sis & advtng WNDU. South Bend, locil sis 

Screen Cems. Detroit, north central div mgr Same, Chi midwest div mgr 

_ WCCO-TV, Minn-St. Paul, dir merch dept Same, natl sis mgr 

WCCO-TV. Minn-St. Paul, asst dir merch dept Same, dir merch dept 

KWTV, Oklahoma City, announcer & sportscaster Same, local sis 

Screen Cems. NY. dir sis devel _ RKO Television NY. special consultant on natl sis 
Kettell-Cartcr. Boston, acct exec 

Cuild Films. NY. production mgr Same, producer commercials 

NBC. NY, controller's dept WMAQ-WNBQ Chi business mgr 

MCM-TV. Chi sis rep-commcrcial & industrial film dept 

..NBC. NY. mgr program ping & devel WCBS Radio. NY. program dir 

Federal Pacific Electric, Newark, asst to mktng research 

super Alfred Politz. NY, research start 

WFAA. Dallas, staff announcer Same, promotion mgr 

Gross-Krasne, Hy. commercial & production depts - Same, gen mgr 

WWJ-AM-TV, Detroit, producer -Petty, Chi. tv sis 

Nowland & Co, Greenwich. Conn, tech dir Alfred Politz. NY. research staff 

Katz. NY. acct exec John Blair. NY. acct exec 

ABC Film Syn. NY CBS TV Net Sales. Chi acct exec 

WOV. NY. acct exec Same, also dir Italian sis 

__KTXN, Austin, gen mgr Same, also KIWW. San Antonio gen sis mgr 

National Film Board of Canada, chief of research & 

reports div Schwenn Research Toronto, managing dir 

B&B. NY. tv dir TclePrompTer NY. dir operations 

Katz. LA. ridio sis Same NY. radio sis 



NEW FIRMS, NEW OFFICES (Change of address 

Caples Co. NY. has moved to 10 E 40th St 

Creative Merchandising Co. NY, new tv firm, is located at 535 Fifth Ave 

Franklin Bruck Advtng, NY, is now named Heineman. Kleinfeld. Shaw & 

Joseph. Inc 
Cereral Pictures Corp. Cleveland, new film company, has offices in the 

Dramaturgy Bldg, 2307 Chester Ave 
Crantray-Lawrence Animation, Hy, has new quarters at 716 North 

LaBrea Ave 
MPO Productions. NY. has opened a Detroit-Midwestern sales office at 

6560 Cass Ave. Detroit 
MPO Television Films. NY. has a new production center at 210 W 65th St 
Mullins Earl Advtng. Hy. has moved to 3308 Beverly Blvd. LA 4 



Pmtoff -Lawrence Productions. NY. new animation studio, is located at 

129 W 52nd St 
Powell-Gayek Advtng. Detroit, has changed its name to Powell Inc. 

Advtng 
Powell & Schoenbrod Advtng Chi. has changed its name to Powell. 

Schocnbrod & Hall Advtng 
Radio Representatives Ltd Montreal PQ has moved to Room 504. 1411 

Crescent St 
Truppe LaGravc & Reynolds Dcs Moines is now located in Suite 535. 

Insurance Exchange Bldg 
Wondsel. Carlisle & Dunphy. NY. new film production firm, is located 

at 1600 Broadway 



SPONSOR 



18 MAY 1957 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



p> TV RESULTS 



HAIR CURLERS 

SPONSOR: Weaver Products VGENGY: Herb Flaig 

Capsule case history: With television its primar) promo- 
tional medium, a soft rubber hair curler called '"Spoolie" 
hit the $200,000 mark in retail sales in the first five weeks 
of the t\ campaign. For the promotion. Weaver Products of 
Minneapolis, makers of "Spoolie," selected WLW-T's Paul 
Dixon Show, a weekday morning variety show, and Headin' 
West, a weekda) afternoon movie. Weaver ran 10 to 11 an- 
nouncements a week on WLW-T during the five-week period. 
In addition to the $200,000 in retail sales, more than $40,- 
000 in back orders were received from drug, department. 
grocer) and 5 & 10 cent stores in the Cincinnati area. Pro- 
duction fell behind demand and customers had to wait six 
to eight weeks for orders. "Spoolie," a new tvpe of curler 
which resembles a small punctured mushroom, retails at 
$1.50 for a package of 32 curlers. Weaver Products now 
i- sponsoring the two shows on a long-range contract basis. 

WLW-T, Cincinnati PURCHASE: Announcement? 



NEW HOMES 

SPONSOR: W. E. Johnson Kealt> AGENCY: Time & Copy 

Capsule case history: \ new home is an expensive item 
but the Wallace E. Johnson Realty Co., using just one tv 
announcement, recently sold 17 houses during a single week- 
end. On the recommendation of Time & Cop) . Johnson Real- 
ty some time ago began using a one-minute announcement 
on WHBQ-TV. The announcement is aired on Thursday 
nights within the Million Dollar Movie. Results have been 
consistently gratifying, but last March one of these weekly 
commercials brought a real sales bonanza. This announce- 
ment covered the opening of Johnson Realty's Value Villa 
homes and was telecast at approximately 10:45 p.m. Thurs- 
day. The firm reported that on Friday morning over 25 
phone calls were received from people who had seen the com- 
mercial and that on Saturday and Sunday 17 homes were 
sold. The sales were attributed directly to the announce- 
ment on Y\ HBQ-TV since Johnson used no other medium. 

WHBQ-TV. Memphis PURCHASE: Announcements 



CHINESE FOOD 

SPONSOR: China Food Kitchen AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Salt Lake City residents in search 
of Chinese food responded so enthusiastically to announce- 
ments on KT\ T that they caused a telephone tie-up which 
probably made the phone company wish they'd all stick to 
steak. For an eight-day period, KTVT ran one 10-second 
announcement each night advertising China Food Kitchens 
home delivery special. "Quickee Chickee." During that time 
tlie information board of the Mountain States Telephone and 
relegraph Co. was swamped with over 2.000 calls requesting 
the number of the trade name "Quickee Chickee." rather 
than the firm name. As a result, the phone company has 
issued multiple listings for the firm. John Quong, of China 
Food Kitchen, stated that compared to other types of adver- 
me in the past, tv gave a much greater and more 
immediate response. He also reported an overall increase 
of 20'; in home deliver) business since the television drive. 
KTVT. Salt Lake City PURCHASE: Vnnouncements 



COFFEE 

SPONSOR: Butter-Nut Coffee Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The special premium offer is a 
standard promotional device used by many kinds of adver- 
tisers in nearly all media. The success of Butter-Nut Cof- 
fee's television promotion shows why advertisers keep re- 
turning to this type of campaign. Butter-Nut made the fol- 
lowing tv offer: "Send 25c and a key strip from a can of 
Butter-Nut Coffee to KOA-TV. Denver, and you'll receive 
10 packs of Burpee seeds, a S2.35 value."" The offer was 
made on W eatherman Bowman s weathercast at 10:10 night- 
1\ and in announcements at various times and ran from 11 
February through 23 March. During this time, requests for 
the seeds were received from 13,456 viewers and the spon- 
sor reported that 15,000 cans of coffee were sold. The pro- 
motion reached far beyond the immediate Denver area. 
Responses to the offer represented a total of 245 cities and 
towns in Colorado. Nebraska. Wyoming and Kansas. 



KOA-TY. Denver 



PURCHASE: Announcements 






SPONSOR 



18 MAY 1957 



No matter how you slice it! 




WROC-TV and 
only WROC-TV can 
guarantee maximum 
circulation throughout 

the ROCHESTER area 

jg) 

Take FIVE delivered homes, rather than FOUR, when you buy the Rochester, New York 
market. Get the most mileage for your advertising dollars in this rich, prime area where 
nearly a million people spend more than a billion dollars annually, in one of the nation's 
first 45 markets. 

MARKET COVERAGE 



HOMES REACHED MONTHLY 


26.2% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


HOMES REACHED ONCE A WEEK 


24.1% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


DAYTIME CIRCULATION 


HOMES REACHED ONCE A WEEK 


24.0% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


HOMES REACHED DAILY AVERAGE 


27.4% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


NIGHTTIME CIRCULATION 


HOMES REACHED ONCE A WEEK 


22.3% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


HOMES REACHED DAILY AVERAGE 


18.6% 


MORE than the other Rochester Channel 


Represented Nationally by Peters. Griffin, 


Woodward Television Sales 




Rochester's MOST POWERFUL Station 



WROC-TV 



SOURCES 

Sales Management Survey 1956 

Nielsen No 2 Spring 1956 



CHANNEL 



A TRANSCONTINENT TELEVISION CORPORATION STATION 
Rochester Broadcasting- Center • Rochester 3. N. Y. • BUtler 8-8-400 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1957 



59 



^ SPONSOR ASKS 




What are your tips on minimizing legal risks ■■ 




Samuel Spring, attorney, New York; 
author of Risks and Rights in Television and 

Publication 
Legal trouble generally comes over 
the content of advertising copy and 
centers upon copyright infringement 
and privacy invasion. The law reports 
contain an increasing list of suits 
brought for copyright infringement 
and privacy invasion by copywriters. 
Unfortunately the judges are far 
stricter with copywriters when it comes 
to these two copy-traps than they are 
with the writers of news, fiction or 
other forms of entertainment. Conse- 



"be careful 
about quoting' 



quently. the copywriter must be very 
careful about quoting. In the instance 
of quotations from a copyrighted 
book in a news article or work of 
fiction, the courts are liberal in up- 
holding the right of fair comment to 
protect a writer who has quoted a 
copyrighted work. But not so in ad- 
vertising. A copywriter who included 
only a short part of a sentence from a 
copyrighted medical work, when ex- 
pounding the virtue of the ingredients 
of a proprietary medicine was dealt 
with severely by the court. The right 
of fair comment, the Court held, did 
not apply. So, too, in the case of the 
use of names, pictures or descriptions 
of a private person or of a public 
entertainer or politician in an adver- 
tisement even apart from an endorse- 
ment of the product. The courts then 
are quick to grant relief against the 
advertiser. The copywriter must re- 
member, moreover, that an oral con- 
sent to use a person's name or picture 
is invalid. The license given must be 



60 



in writing. As to the use of copy- 
righted material in an advertisement 
the consent may be oral but it is better 
to have it in writing. Usually it is not 
dillicult to get such consent if appli- 
cation is made in advance. 

The current popularity of humorous- 
toned, spot commercials in television 
are raising problems as to how far- 
reaching invasion can be legally safe 
as satire or burlesque. When CBS used 
MGM's copyrighted motion picture 
"Gaslight," without license for a 
humorous broadcast on the theory that 
a user of copyrighted material for 
burlesque purposes could do so with- 
out license as fair comment, the court 
held, (quoting the rule stated in my 
book, Risks and Rights in Television 
and Publication) that an extensive use 
of copyrighted material for satire, imi- 
tation or burlesque was an infringe- 
ment. The Supreme Court of the 
United States considered this issue so 
important that it has allowed an appeal 
and will consider the matter in full. 



Ca Heron C. Eld ridge, Jr., partner of 
the law firm of Coudert Brothers, New York 
In general it may be said that . . . 
"the noblest of human productions — 
knowledge, truths ascertained, concep- 
tions, and ideas — become, after volun- 
tary communication to others, free as 
the air to common use." Why then all 




"periodic 
employee 
education' 



the talk about "internal security" to 
avoid claims and suits charging your 
agency or company with the misappro- 
priation of merchandising schemes, 
advertising concepts, program ideas 
and the like? Doesn't the law mean 



what it says? Yes . . . but . . .! No 
company enjoys defending lawsuits; 
it's costly; personnel are diverted from 
their primary productive functions; 
press references usually refer only to 
the "charges" accompanying the filing 
of suit, and, of course, there's al\va\s 
the risk of loss. 

To nip the problem at the outset 
really requires an internal program, 
consistent with company policy, which 
endeavors to prevent the possibility of 
an "idea" being submitted under cir- 
cumstances other than that of a volun- 
tary communication. In addition to 
such a program, periodic employee 
education in the program and the 
reasons for its existence is a "must." 
Since all surveys with which the 
writer is familiar clearly indicate that 
"ideas" received from the general 
public have been anticipated or are 
not feasible in the form submitted, it 
seems that policy would dictate the 
formulation of a program tending to 
minimize the risk of suits charging 
"idea-theft," rather than one that en- 
courages their disclosure. 

Such a program would, in the 
writer's opinion, require the following 
fundamentals: 

a) an express policy statement (and 
practice) to the effect that the company 
does not wish to consider unsolicited 
ideas, and 

b) an internal "routing and return" 
sy r stem whereunder "mailed-in ideas" 
are. as a matter of record and routine, 
not exposed to creative and executive 
personnel and are returned promptly 
with a letter recital of company policy 
which precludes consideration of such 
material. 

This policy, if followed, would also 
preclude the receipt of "talked-in 
ideas" (in person submissions). 

The so-called "release forms," 
which are nothing more than agree- 
ments reciting the terms and condi- 
tions under which a company will 
undertake to consider an "idea," are 



SPONSOR • 18 may 1957 






helpful I'Mi are normall) not the pane- 
icni answer. Their use is common and 
does Bomewhal represent a workable 
solution for those companies which 
prefer to afford tli< - public an oppor- 
tunity i" participate. 

\\ hen in doubt as t" how i" handle 
an unsolicited idea submission, seek 
tin advice of your compan) attorney. 
^ on m ill both be glad (hat \ ou did. 



Ccraldinc B. Zorbaugh, vice president 
am! general attorney, ( US Radio, Vew York 
I'lic substantia] damages awarded 1>\ 
jurie- in recent years for the un- 
authorized ii^e ol literal) material 
have awakened the industr) to the 
need for protection against amateur 
idea peddlers. 

However, even the copyright experts 
have not \et agreed on the best 

method o| avoiding claims based on 
Unsolicited "ideas."" \ller \ears of 

experience with nuisance claims based 
on unsolicited submissions, some com- 
panies have established procedures for 
keeping such unsolicited material awa\ 
from creative and executive personnel. 
f the submission comes in the mail, 




"copy right 
experts have not 
\rt agreed" 



the letter is returned to the Bender with 
a statement, drafted or approved b\ 
counsel, advising that the compan) has 
an established policj against consider- 
ing unsolicited material. Some com- 
panies return the letter with a release 
form which states elearb the terms and 
conditions upon which the submission 
will be reviewed. For da\ -to-da\ pro- 
tection there is no substitute for com- 
petent staffs in editing and literary 
tights departments where factual infor- 
mation is compiled for reference pur- 
poses. When a question arises as to 
whether one has or has not the right 
to use certain material, the informa- 
tion from the editing or Literal - ) rights 
department should be evaluated b) an 
attorney. 

Because no one lias yet found a way 
to eliminate human error or to elimi- 
nate the filing of unjustified claims 
and costly defense, main companies 
are insured against such liability 



Russell Sillcry, claim* attoi oard 

Surt ty Co \ en ) ork 

\s an Insurant e Can iei i ovei ing libel, 
slandei . copj right infi ingement, pii 
plagiarism and invasion of priva< y, we 
cannot dictate the mannei in which 
oui Insureds' should condui t theii ad- 
vertising activ ities i,, a\ oid i laims 
and oi suits. While ibis is apparentl) 
contrar) to histoi i>' insui ance pi a< I i< e 

which is to redui e I lairns and m -nits 

frequenc) b\ what is commonl) called 
"safet) engineei ing, ii results from 
the nature of the covered hazards. 

I he question of procedures and safe- 
guards against libel and slander falls 
exclusivel) in the area 01 legal opinion 



2 



"it falls in 

the urea of 
legal opinion' 



and advice. By the same token, copy- 
right infringement, pirac) and plagia- 
rism, also, are purel) questions of legal 
opinion rendered about a specific ad- 
vertisement, broadcast or commercial. 
In such cases, ever) item must be 
judged on its own merits and in prac- 
tically all of them, there is sufficient 
differences to warrant an expert legal 
interpretation. Such a service, of 
course, may not be rendered by an In- 
surance Company; otherwise, we 
would be engaged illegall) in the prac- 
tice of law. 

However, we do attempt to act as 
an information "clearing house. That 
is. for example in the area of idea. 
slogan or title submission, we do ex- 
hibit copies of release forms used by 
networks, advertising agencies and ad- 
vertisers prior to the acceptance of 

BUch submissions with a suggestion 
that thev consult with their own coun- 
sel regarding their adoption. 

In the field of privacy invasion, the 
onl) problem is to secure a properly 
executed release for the use ol any- 
one's photograph or name. Since this 
is a New York statutor) requirement, 
we simpl) cite Sections 50 and il ol 
the Ci\ il Rights law . 

Our contact with practical!) e\ 
claim and suit in this field, enables ug 
to keep ourselves and our insureds 
conversant with the latest develop- 
ments. Ibis is our contribution toward 
"safet) engineering." *? 




SEE 

How WKBT 
Has Grown Since 
March, 1956! 




1. VIDEO POWER 
INCREASED FROM 
100,000 TO 

250,000 WATTS! 



2. PENETRATION 

STRENGTHENED #r / 
FROM 50 TO . . . 0j_/o 

Meaning a Greater 

Percentage of Viewers 

Over An Extended Area! 



WKBT 



Serving: 130.000 TV Homes 



8 



CHWMI ^BK It ( ROssf Wl- 



CBS - NBC - ABC 

Represented by: 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 

& 

HARRY HYETT, Minneapolis 



SPONSOR 



18 MAY L957 



61 




old movies 



new ones 



I 

■ 



»3 

• 




X 




. . . more 

than just 

riding the 

network! 



The Best 

Network, 

movies 

and 

local "live" 

everyday makes 




HOUSTON'S 
BEST BUY 

KTRK-TV 

CHANNEL 



THE CHRONICLE STATION, CHANNEL 13 

P O. BOX 12, HOUSTON I, TEXAS-ABC BASIC 

HOUSTON CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION CO. 

General Manager, Willard E. Walbridge 

Commercial Manager, Bill Bennett 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: Geo. P. Hollingbery Co. 

500 Fifth Avenue, New York 36, New York 



62 



\ ational and regional spot buys 
in work nou or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Harold H. Ritchie, Clifton, Y J., is going into about 15 markets 
throughout the countr) to advertise its Brylcreem; 30-minute seg- 
ments during "A" time arc being purchased for a syndicated film 
series. Silent Service. Objective: a male audience. The 52-week test 
schedule will begin shortly; ratings and -ales results will be care- 
fnll\ correlated. Film commercials will continue to be puppet-anima- 
tion. Buying is not completed. Buver: Midge Krone. Agency : 
\thtiton iw Currier, New 'i ork. (This is a departure from Br\ I- 
creem's late-night movie pattern of the past. See sponsor 23 Jul) '56.) 

General Foods Corp., Post Cereals div., Battle Creek. Mich.. A\ill 
switch its schedule for Sugar Rice Krinkles to its Sugar Crisp cereal 
and add about 15 scattered markets in September. Minute participa- 
tions are being sought in late afternoon children's shows. The num- 
ber of announcements per week in a market will range from three 
to 10. Commercials will be on film and live. Bu\ ing is not com- 
pleted. Buyer: In. Wilson. \genc\ : Benton & Bowles. New York. 

The California Oil Co., Perth Amboy, N. .].. is entering about 15 
markets on the Eastern seaboard from Maine to \ irginia for its new 
super-premium Calso gasoline: 20-second announcements will be 
placed 8-10:30 p.m. for a 13-week schedule. Frequency per week 
in each market will be four to six top-rated announcements. Film 
commercials for "Calso Supreme 300-Plus" will sell the themes: i 1 I 
especially designed for late model cars. even those with 300-plus 
horsepower; (2) the highest octane rating of any Calso gasoline: 
and (3) an exclusi\e detergent-action additive for cleaner carbure- 
tion. Bu\ing is completed. Buyer: Trow Klliman. Agency: BBDO. 
New York. 

Lambert-Hudnut Div., subsidiary of Warner-Lambert Pharmaceu- 
tical Co.. Morris Plains. N. J., is going into main markets to adver- 
tise its Richard Hudnut Quick Home Permanent. Campaign will 
begin 27 May and run for 18 weeks. Minute film announcements will 
be placed during daytime hours. Average number per week in each 
market will be three. Buying is half completed. Buyers: \ era 
Brennan and Fred Spruytenburg. Agency : SSCB. New Vtrk. 

RADIO BUYS 

Salada Tea Co., Inc., Boston, is buying in major Northeastern 
markets. Schedule will begin in early June and continue until the end 
of the year. Minute announcements will be slotted during daytime 
segments for a women's audience. Commercials will be e.t. s and 
live. Buying has just started. Buyer: Fred Spruytenburg. Agency: 
SSCB, New York. 

Union Carbide & Carbon Corp., New York, is entering farm areas 
to promote its Crag Chodin. a fruit fungicide. The original plan 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western nevadai 



"BEELINE«— o 

dUlu>e/is *no*e -fox, -fcta, fcuyveif 



I 




This group of mountain-ringed radio 
stations, purchased as a unit, delivers 
more radio homes than any combina- 
tion of competitive stations ... at by 
far the lowest cost per thousand. 
(Nielsen & SR&D) 

They serve this amazingly rich in- 
land market — with triple the retail 
sales of the Atlanta metropolitan mar- 
ket — and effective buying income of 
nearly $4.3 billion, more than all of 
Iowa. (Sales Management's 1956 

Copyrighted Survey) 



/UcCtatduf KFBK 



O Rf 



INTO 



\ 



f^/toOctCCtdtMU} KMJ 

C*n*paAMj KERM 



KBEE O: MODESTO 
FRESNO* 



Hfre 
to 



BAKERSFIEID 



Sacramento, California 

Paul H. Raymer Co., 

National Representative 




>PO\>OR 



18 MATT 1957 



63 



Spot buys continued. 




was to use print exclusively, hut because of the early summer weather 
and quick blooming of the fruit, the advertiser decided to use the 
immediacy impact of radio; 7-week campaign will begin shortly. 
Minute participations in, and adjacencies to, farm shows will be pur- 
chased; frequency will be two-a-da\. six da\s a week. Buying is com- 
pleted. Buyer: Troy Ferguson. Agency: Albert Sidney Noble Adv., 
New York. 

Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Brooklyn, will begin a schedule in 20 
markets to advertise its Bonadettes, a car sickness remedv. Campaign 
begins 20 May for 15 weeks. Minutes, 20's and 30's will be slotted 
throughout the day for saturation; average number of announce- 
ments per week will vary from market to market. Commercials will 
be e.t.'s and live. Buying is completed. Buyer: Betty Nasse. Agencv: 
Dowd, Redfield and Johnston, Inc., New York. 

Hudson Vitamin Products Corp., New York, is planning a many- 
market buy. Live minute participations are being sought in women's 
service type shows. Advertising appeals: I 1 I qualitv vitamins at 
lower prices; and (2) write for catalogue and let your doctor make 
recommendations based on our formulas. Buying has just started. 
Buyer: Irving Krouse. Agency: Pace Advertising Agency, New York. 

The Chattanooga Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn., is entering 
Southern markets to promote its Dyrid, an anti-diarrheal; 19-week 
campaign will start 3 June. Minute e.t.'s will be placed during early 
morning hours and noon. Average number of announcements per 
week in each market will be 10 for the first four weeks, five there- 
after. Target : an adult audience leaning tow ard w omen. Buying is 
not completed. Buyer: Bernie Singer. Agency: Harry B. Cohen. 
New York. 



RADIO AND TV BUYS 

Doeskin Products, Inc., New York, is planning a campaign for its 
Doeskin tissues. The short-term schedule will begin in early June. 
On tv, minute announcements will be slotted primarily during day- 
time hours. Average number of announcements per week will var\ 
from market to market. On radio, the advertiser is purchasing par- 
ticipations in morning and afternoon personality shows. Frequency 
varies. The live radio commercials and filmed tv commercials are 
slanted to women. Buying is completed in tv, incomplete in radio. 
Buyer: Manny Klein. Agency: Harry B. Cohen. New York. 

Hathaway Bakeries, Inc., S\ racuse. is entering markets in \r» 
York and Ohio where it has door-to-door distribution for its bread. 
Radio and tv campaign uses a contest to promote its new Big League 
bread; 15-market schedule will begin 10 June and run for 13 weeks. 
The advertiser is seeking participations in. and adjacencies to. late 
afternoon and Saturday children's shows in tv: average number of 
announcements per week in each market will be M). In radio, an- 
nouncements will be slotted around the clock to reach mother: fre- 
quent per week in each market will be 40-50. Radio commercials 
are e.t.'s. tv commercials film. Bu\ing is completed. Buyer: Ed Rat- 
ner. Agency: Friend-Riess Adv., New York. 



64 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




"but why should 

have to sell my 

representative, too?" 



Good question! Yet this station manager 
with a well-established TV outlet in a good 
market faces .1 problem confronting more 
ami more television operators todaj . 

Competition for the TV advertising dollar 
is understandable. It demands hard selling. 
But competition to get a fair share ol your 
representative's attention .. competition with 
a host of other stations on his list . . simph 
doesn't make sense. 

You shouldn't have to sell your representa- 
tive on performing his job fully. And with 
specialized representation, you don't. 
There's no routine, no "production line" 
formula when you're one of the qualit) Si 
tions on Harrington, Righter and Parsons' 
limited list. Your representation is tailored 
to your station's distinctly e merits In pe< iple 
who specialize only in the television medium. 
Caliber TV Stations like those below don't 
want to be one of the pack. With us, they 
never are ! 



HARRINGTON, 
RIGHTER 
& PARSONS, Inc. 



television — the only medium we serve 



WCDA-B-C.4/6an) WAAM WBEN-TV WJRT /Vini 

WFMY-TV; WTPA WTIC-TV 

WDAF-TV k WHAS-TV WTMJ-TV 

WMTW 1/ WRVA-TV hmon.i WSYR-TV S 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



65 




MORI 

radio homes at the 

LOWEST 

cost per home are 

DELIVERED 
by WSUN 

than any other station in the 

HEART of 
FLORIDA 

(check your Nellsen No. 2) 

WSUN RADIO 

ST. PETERSBURG - TAMPA 

Represented By VENARD, RINTOUL. & 

McCONNELL 

Southeastern: JAMES S. AYERS 




Rochester's 5 
Most Wanted* Men 

* WANTED . . . by audiences and advertisers 
. . . because they make WVET's 
unique programs of music, loved by 
all . . . and every-hour news . . . 
NUMBER ONE in Rochester radio for 
reception and response. 




ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

1280 K. C. 5000 WATTS 

Represented Nationally by 
THE BOILING COMPANY 



J 



66 



News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

At the National Industrial Adver- 
tisers annual conference (9-12 
June) Dr. Wilson Handle, senior 
partner at Booz, Alien & Hamil- 
ton, will reveal that major manu- 
facturers expeet 30% to 80% of 
their growth in the next three 
years to eome from new products. 
Randle's talk will be based on a 
stud) of 400 top industrial firms. 

Who is principally responsible for 
the boom in spot ami network ra- 
dio? Kevin Sweeney, RAB presi- 
dent, credits it to advertisers who spent 
little or no money in radio during pre- 
tv days. 

Advertisers like Beechnut with 
75 r yc of its budget and Listerine with 
$2!/2 million dollars invested in radio 
this vear are typical of accounts which 
spent little money in the medium prior 
to recent months. 

New Products: Bristol-Myers is 

bringing out an anti-dandruff prepara- 
tion. Theradan, this month. Air media 
used to promote the formula will be 
two of Bristol-Myers' tv shows, Alfred 
Hitchcock Presents and Playhouse 90 
(both on CBS TV). DCSS is the agen- 
cy. .. . Toni will debut its New Wav 
Toni kit with plastic applicator on 1 
June and will back the addition to the 
home permanent line with heavy tv 



an, I radio support. North is Toni s 
agency. 

Fleischmann Division of Standard 
Brands is doing another promo- 
tional job for its customers' cus- 
tomers: this time the restaurant 
trade. 

The campaign, which Fleisehmann is 
underwriting, will run in 22 major 
markets for two months. The ke\ stone 
of the tie-up between Fleischmann and 
its customers is a contest in which lo- 
cal disk jockeys will ask married wom- 
en to write on the theme: "I deserve 
to eat out at least once a week, be- 
cause . . .' Prizes include eight free 
meals each and wages for babv sitter. 

People in the news: Gordon Ack- 
land has been appointed director of 
advertising for all Royal McBee prod- 
ucts and Xavier N. Benziger will 
take over as advertising manager for 
typewriter products. Royal McBee is 
currently using two network tv specials 
{Washington Square on 20 Mav and 4 
June I to promote graduation sales. . . . 
William Bien, general sales manager 
for the brewerv division of Anheuser- 
Busch, has been elected a v. p. and 
will now direct all sales, advertising, 
merchandising, market research and 
sales promotion for that division. 

This Thursday (23 May) the ANA 
will hold its annual advertising re- 




"Summer's Special on 
KYW" Cleveland station 
u-e> mystery gal theme 



WCCO-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul, king-sized news faeilities in- 
clude >2 10 M|iiare foot studio, 8' x 10' rear screen ami special 
effect- amplifier for 10 o'clock News, Weather and Sports program 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1951 




Here is 

listener (- 



coverage^ 

unmatched 
by an y radio 
station in the 
Mid-South! 



109 counties in 6 states in the heart 
of the important Mid-South area 

"Monthly coverage 

Weekly coverage 

Average weekly daytime 

Average da I me 

Radio Memphis 

Also first in Hooper, Pulse 68-county survey, Pulse nrv ey, 

Hooper business establishment survey and Hooper car survey! 



Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc. Stations: 

Radio Ba ,+ ;~ce I B*^« rWn. 
WCAO 

REPRESENTED NATlONALl I RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1 ( )",7 



67 



search workshop at The Plaza, 
New York. 

One feature of interest to air media 
advertisers will be "A New Creative 
Approach to Testing Tv Commercials" 
by Albert Shepard, executive v. p., In- 
stitute for Motivational Research. 

Broadcast Advertiser Reports is 
adding a new "competitive copy" 
report to its list of services. 

New plan will note and transcribe 
copy changes of network and national 
spot advertisers. 



Following is a rundown of the big- 
gest station buys by advertiser 
category in March, according to 
Jim BoersCs Spot Radio Reports: 

CATEGORY CLIENT STATIONS 

Agriculture Swift _ 95 

Automotive Oldsmobile 306 
Beers & 

Wines Anheuser-Busch _ 69 

Beverages Tetley Tea 117 

Cigarettes Kent _ 91 

Confections .Beechnut 230 

Foods General Foods 240 



for 



COVERAGE 



WBIR-TV covers more than 
50 prosperous counties in 
East Tennessee, Kentucky 
and North Carolina. 





HEIGHT 



WBIR-TV's antenna tow- 
ers 991 feet above the 
average terrain. 



for 



POWER 

WBIR-TV is one of the 
nation's most powerful sta- 
tions operating on a full 
316,000 watts. 



CALL YOUR KATZ MAN 
for availabilities 




WBIR-TY 

Serving Tennessee s 2nd Market 

KIOZVILLBlA 
CHANNEL I U 




Household 

Prods d-Con 286 

Insurance Metropolitan Life _ 32 

Cleansers Tidy House _ 51 

Toiletries Shulton 73 

Transport. Eastern Airlines 59 

Utilities . .Bell Tele., Pa. _ _ 99 

AGENCIES 

JWT is boiling down its "radio 
bible." This is a compilation of data 
on radio's new dimensions and poten- 
tial, which was worked up when the 
agency was negotiating with the four 
radio networks for its big Ford splurge. 

The new testament on radio will be 
reduced to fundamentals (present vol- 
ume is two inches thick I and will be 
circulated to every account group at 
Thompson. 

This should eventually lead to more 
money going radio's way. 

New agency appointments: Ander- 
son & Cairns for the newly formed 
Corinthian Broadcasting Corp. 

New Book: "Advertising Media" by 
Lyndon O. Brown, Richard S. Less- 
ler and William >L Wilbacher de- 
tails media planning and explains how 
advertisers formulate marketing strate- 
gy. Cost-per-1,000 concept and audi- 
ence measurement are given full treat- 
ment. Contains many charts and tables 
within its 395 pages, is priced at S7.50. 
Publisher is Ronald Press, New York. 
Brown is v.p. and media director at 
D-F-S Agency and Weilbacher is his 
executive assistant. Lessler is v.p. of 
marketing and research at Grew 

Focus on personalities: George 
W. Davidson has joined Compton as 
a v.p. and account supervisor. He for- 
merly was a marketing executive for 
JWT. . . . Lawrence Weitzner has 
been promoted to assistant to Charles 
L. Rothschild, executive v.p. and ac- 
count supervisor, at Emil Mogul. . . . 
Frank Carvel has joined Ayer on the 
timebuying staff. . . . Julian Watkins 
has been named chairman of a new 
creative review board at Campbell- 
Mithun. . . . Robert F. Stanton has 
joined Ketchum. MacLeod & Grove as 
an account executive. . . . Earl Tim- 
mons has been appointed research di- 
rector for Stomberger. La\ ene. Mc- 
Kenzie. . . . Clifford Spiller moves 
over to SSCB as senior v.p. in charge 
of the Pall Mall account and member 
{Please turn to page 72) 



68 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 







^s***^- 




Announcing . . . 

SPONSOR'S FIRST ANNUAL 
TV/RADIO TRADE PAPER 

ADVERTISING AWARDS 



THE NEED: Trade paper advertising in today's television and radio industry 
is improving. But quantity is moving faster than quality. Agencies and ad- 
vertisers complain, "We don't get enough meat from trade ads." Stations ask, 
"What do buyers want to know?" On the premise that example is the best teach- 
er, and to do our bit to inspire, stimulate, and reward the best campaigns of the tv 
and radio advertising industry, SPONSOR inaugurates its annual advertising 
awards. A distinguished group of tv and radio executives, each an active large- 
scale spot and network buyer, will serve as judges. SPONSOR reports with 
pride, and as an expression of advertiser agency enthusiasm for such awards, 
that all but one of the invitations to serve on this panel was promptly accepted. 





Publisher 



COMPETITION DETAILS 

Who is eligible? 

Am ti station, radio station, network, broad 
east group, tdm lyndii ttor, and broadcasl ion 
n .-, rep, manufacturer, producer, "i supplier. 

Award Classifications 

tv stations • ,oss ,0 " hourly rati 

Group I to $500 

(.roup 2 $500 to $1000 

Group .5 $1000 to $1500 

(.roup I $1500 to $2000 

Group ■"> $2(100 and over 

radio stations 

Group (' '" $150 

Group 7 $150 /« $300 

(.roup H $300 to $450 

(.roup «> Xt.'tO U, $600 

(.roup 10 $600 anil orcr 

(.roup I 1 networks 

(.roup \2 group-owned stations 

(.roup I '.i iilin syndicatora 

(.roup 1 I i> commercial producers 

(.roup I . > broadcast services, reps, 

manufacturers, producers, suppliers 
Awards 

1. First-place winner in each group is awarded 
specially-designed plaque. 

2. Promotion manage] ol each First-place win- 
ner is awarded a 150 government bond and 
a certificate bearing his name. 

3. Meritorious awards will I"- given 2nd, 3rd, 
lilt, and 5th place entries in each ^roup. 

4. Winning campaigns will be featured in an 
Awards Issue of SPONSOR 

Entries 

Each entry must consist oi five or more differ- 
ent advertisements of a campaign thai has been 
printed in any trade publication or publications 
during the 12 months preceding Julj 1957. 
i entry must also include (1) classification 
in which entry belongs; (2) name and address 
of entry; (3) names of general manager, pro- 
motion manager, and ad\i iti-nm agency; I 1 
single page Bummarj expressing objective and 
strategy of the campaign with r<-ult-. if known. 
Each station of a group-owned company may 
enter it- individual campaign. All entries be- 
come the properly of SPONSOR. 

Deadline 

Competition closes 1~> August 1957, Winners 
will be announced in an issue of SPONSOB 

-hortly after Labor Day. 1T>7. 

Judges 

Judge- are George Ahrams, vice president in 
charge of advertising, Revlon; Donald Cady, 
vice president in charge of general advertising, 
Nestle; William Dekker, vice president in 
charge of Media, nfcCann-Erickson; Frank B. 
Kemp, vice president and director media. < otnp- 
ton: Peter (".. Levathes, vice president and di- 
rector media relations, Young & Rubicam; 
I. S. Matthew-, vice president and manager 
media department. Leo Burnett: Francis Mine- 
ban, vice president and media director. SSC&B; 
Arthur Porter, vice president and media direc- 
tor. J. Walter Thompson; Rod MacDonald, vice 
president and media director. Guild, Bascom 
and Bonfigli. 

Special Contribution 

... to Broadcasters' Promotion Association: 
To encourage the aims and activity of the fast- 
growing BPA, SPONSOR will contribute - 

lion entry. The contribution will be in the 
to this organization for each tv and radio sta- 
name of the promotion manager of the station. 



from the president of the 

BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION 




BROADCASTERS' PROMOTION ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Chimin Building • I 22 last 4!ndStrref Nrw York 17. N Y • MUrray HlU7-OBOt 



omctm% 

PrtuJtnt 

Wciiinihousc 
RrnaJcuting Co.. lac. 

rtm iWMtai 

C hirle. A W.tiofi 
won * woN-rv 

Snond Vlcf-Pfltdinl 
MaaM T>den 

■.WTV 
Mien M JohioKS 
omfercmi 



Samu*l Elber 

MM 
GeneGodt 

Marion Annenheri 

*r-ft A WOSU-TV 

Icy /immermiuia 

Will • WFH-TV 

Joe O HudifnV 

SUNT* HINT-TV 
John M Kejri 
v. M»0 A WNBQ 

Fcnter H. Brcm-p 



h 28. 1957 



Mr. Norman Glenn. Publisher 

SPONSOR 

40 East 49th Street 

New York. New York 

Dear Norm: 

Congratulations on your proposed trade paper advertising i onteit 
for the broadcasting industry! 

The contest you propose cannot help but bring about a much •• 
improvement in the quality of broadcast advertising in trade publi- 
cations --by encouraging stations and related businesses to cast a 
more critical eye at their own advertising It has always been a 
mystery to me why so many astute station operators have shown 
little or no imagination, inspiration, and showmanship li 
tising of their own facilities to the trade Outstanding examples of 
broadcast advertising or campaigns in the trades have been ; 
fully few and far between, despite the healthy expenditures made 
each year in this type of advertising 

I hardly need repeat. Norm, how delighted I am that SP*j' 
plans to contribute $5.00 to the Broadcasters' Promotion As* 
tion for each entry received in the contest As President of i 
I can assure you I will do everything possible to promo*, 
mum number of entries among nPA member stations --as well as 
the stations throughout the country. The funds derived fron 
generous contribution from will enable BPA to pr 

more and better services to its members -- and help ass-jr. 
continuing growth and usefulness. 

Cordially. 



SPONSOR 



David E. Partridge 
President 



DEP.J 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV AND RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



WHAT 

IS 
YOUR 
PHOTO- 
GRAPHIC 
MAL- 
ADJUSTMENT 



m 

■ 



1) QUALITY 

2) SERVICE 

3) PRICE 

THESE ARE THE 3 
BIG PROBLEMS 

Let us cure them for you 
as we have done for some 
of the top business firms 
and advertising agencies 




DAKALAR 
■*£OSMO 

^^^ Photographers 

119 W. 57th St., N.Y.C. Ci. 6-3476 
PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR SPONSOR 

BAKALAR-COSMO 

119 W. 57th St., N. Y. C. 

Gentlemen: Please have your represen- 
tative □ Phone □ Drop in 

Date Time 

Address Tel. No. 



of the plans board. Spiller was former 
director of marketing for the Maxwell 
House division of General foods. . . . 
Christopher A. Santc, director of 
research at Lennen & Newell, has been 
made a senior v. p. and will also act as 
liaison between management, account 
supervisors and department heads on 
marketing plans. . . . Cay Gibson has 
been named to head up the Doyle- 
Dane-Bernbach sales promotion de- 
partment. . . . Charles D. Hylsman, 
Jr., has been named an account execu- 
tive with W. S. Walker Advertising 
and James F. Devine is the new 
creative director for the agency. . . . 
Phillip Wolf has been made radio-tv 
director for Mottl & Siteman. Los An- 
geles. . . . Shannon Patrick LaFon- 
taine has been appointed purchasing 
and production manager for the new 
sales aid section of MacManus. John & 
Adams. 

They became v.p.'s this week : 
Michael J. Donovan at B&B. . . . 
Louis J. Nieholaus at K&E. Boston. 
. . . Arnold M. Combrinck-Graham, 
Jr. and C. Stuart Siebert, Jr., at 
K&E. Chicago. . . . Melcon Tashian 
at FCB, New York, and Marlen 
Loehrke at FCB. Chicago. . . . 
George Grabin at Arthur Meyerhoff 
& Co. 

New agencies: Marvin L. Grant, 

formerly v. p. of Dobin Advertising, 
has formed his own company in New 
York. . . . Bernie Ebert is opening 
an agency in Hollywood. Ebert is a tv 
producer and most recently was with 
KTLA, Los Angeles, as production su- 
pervisor. 

NETWORKS 

Excerpts from talks on the theme 
of Radio Week: 

Matthew J. Culligan, v.p. NBC 
Radio, at St. Louis Ad Club luncheon 
told members these seven elements 
have contributed to the clearing at- 
mosphere for network radio: 

(1) audience level has stabilized. 
(2) big advertisers returning. (3) 
highly promotable new program ideas, 
(4) emergence of the popular tran- 
sistor radio, (5) radio bridges gaps 
in tv advertising continuity, (6) has 
more news and cultural programs, and 
(7) affiliates, national advertisers and 
agencies all want radio to succeed. 

John Karol, v.p. CHS Radio net- 
work sales, told Texas broadcast ing 



executives that radio's unique charac- 
teristics can best be summed up as "af- 
fordable frequency." 

Louis Hausman, v.p., advertising 
for CBS Radio, at the Ohio State In- 
stitute for Education by Radio and Tv 
said that by new sales patterns in ra- 
dio an advertiser can now reach more 
customers than he could via 1949's top 
half hour show or today's average 
nighttime tv program. 

Robert E. Eastman, ABC Radio 
president, made his Radio Week com- 
ments during a special network pro- 
gram. He pointed out that radio's 
"power" is its speed. 

Fall tv programing notes: Your 
Hit Parade will keep its 10:30-11 
p.m. spot on NBC TV next season in- 
stead of moving back to 10 p.m. . . . 
Wildroot has now cancelled plans to 
sponsor New York Confidential on 
CBS TV Saturdays 10:30-11 p.m. . . . 
General Foods and Borden have 
both renewed CBS TV's Fury, Satur- 
days 11-11:30 a.m. . . . Perry Como 
Show is sold out for the 1957-58 sea- 
son with Kimberly-Clark, Noxzema, 
RCA-Whirlpool, and Sunbeam each 
renewing their alternate week one- 
thirds and American Dairv and Kno- 
mark coming in as new advertisers. 

Current tv programing notes: The 
high-rated daytime Tennessee Er- 
nie Ford Show will bow off NBC TV 

the end of June. This follows an 
agreement made with his sponsor when 
Tennessee Ernie went nighttime last 
fall. Replacement will be Bride and 
Groom. 

Buck Benny rides again — at the 
top of Nielsen's network radio rat- 




Td be listening to KRIZ Phoenix, 
if you could only fix a radio!" 



72 



SPONSOR 



18 ma? 1957 










Wb Ain't &thiri but fhe 1 




• • • in Denver and San Francisco 



iff Number 1 in Denver 

By all standards, KOSl boasts the Number 1 
[ndependent station in Denver: .March-April 
Hooper compliments KOSl's programming 
with a 15.7 AM : lit. I'M share. February 
Puis,, gives K0S1 a comfortable 15.5 all-day 
average. The trend is upward ratings con- 
tinue to climb a-- proof of KOSl's increasing 
popularity. Kosi sells the Denver markel 
with 5000 watts daytime -operates full time. 



Number 1 in San Francisco 

Alii might, K< >BY jump 

1 [ndependenl in San Francisco. March 
Hooper: 17.8 A.M. 25.5 I'M daytin 
Saturdays Sundays. Neilsen 

K< >BY Number I [ndependenl at 21 
N'si Area Audience 6 AM-Midnight. KOBY 
full time sells full time! Its 10 
r the entire ha;. aMng it the 

mosl powerful independent station in San 
Francis< 



Mid-America Broadcasting Co. 

Effective June I, represented by Edward Petry J Co., Inc. 




CBS 

AFFILIATED with KROD-600 kc (5000w 
Owned & Operated by El Paso Times, Inc^ 



Rep. Nationally by the BRANHAM COMPANY 



1 People 



stay at the 

Jtoje/ Ax wafer* 

• 3 Minutes from Grand Central 

• Convenient to Fifth Avenue 
Shopping 

» All Outside Rooms with Tub 
and Shower 

• Radio; Television; Circulating 
Ice-Water 



HOME OF THE FAMOUS 

'Hawaiian 
Room* 

Knoun for ttilliemit 

Hawaiian Cuisine ami 

Motive Entertainment 

see your 

local travel agency 

or tcrite to Promotion 

Dept. for Brochure 180. 



LEXINGTON AVE. at 48th ST. 
NEW YORK CITY, 17 



BOSTON— HANCOCK 6-6625 

CHICACO— DEARBORN 2-4432 

MIAMI— FRANKLIN 9-8331 




iifis. The Jack Benrv) Shan (taped 

re-run- i liil the number one spot in 
the current report (two weeks ending 
6 April i. 

ABC Radio's latest sales report lists 
over $1.1 million in new and renewed 
business. New buys include participa- 
tions in the morning block In Ball 
Brothers and d-Con. Renewals are 
from the Gospel Broadcasting Associa- 
tion and the Highland Church of 
Christ lor their two religious hours. 
. . . Keystone has added 16 new affili- 
ates, bringing the total up to 948. 

New personnel appointments: Ar- 
mand Grant has been named execu- 
tive producer for daytime programs 
at ABC TV. Grant will lie responsible 

for much of the network's proposed 
new live, daytime programing which is 
tentatively scheduled to be slotted 
from 3-5 p.m. (See "Tv's Hottest Bat- 
tleground." SPONSOR, 4 May, for de- 
tails on the ABC TV show line-up). 
. . . Patrie Rastall has joined CBS 
TV sales, Chicago, as an account ex- 
ecutive. . . . Robert G. McKee has 
been appointed an account executive 
for ABC TV sales, central division. 

To help eiients and agencies evalu- 
ate individual network station line-ups, 
NBC TV has set up a tv station sales 
unit within its network tv sales service 
department. C. Herbert Clarke will 
head up 



the unit as manager. 



TV STATIONS 

WCCO-TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
has an answer to those critics who 
deery the lack of sufficient news 
coverage on tv. 

The station has recently expanded 
its nighttime news segment from 10 to 
30 minutes, doubled its news staff I now 
22 behind-the-scenes members plus 
eight on-the-air people ) and remod- 
eled and expanded its facilities so that 
the news department now 7 takes in al- 
most an entire floor of the WCCO 
building. The station currently car- 
ries a total of 28 local news shows per 
week. 

Tv Applications: Between 6 and 11 
May. two construction permits were 
granted and four applications for new 
stations were granted. 

Construction permits went to Lock 
Haven Broadcasting Corp. ( W BPZ I 
for Lock Haven. Pa.. Channel 32: 20- 



kw visual, and to Harriscope Inc. for 
Channel 9 in Sheridan, Wyo.: 3.08-kw 
visual. 

\pplications are: Malco Theatres, 
Inc. for Channel 54 in I tica. N. Y., 
and Channel 48 in Memphis. Term.. 
with 25.7-kw \isual and 614.5-kw visu- 
al respectively; to St. Anthonj Tele- 
vision Corp. for Channel 11 in Houma, 
La., with 316-kw visual: to Brown 
Telecasters Inc. for Channel 12 in 
Beaumont. Tex., visual 316-kw. 

RADIO STATIONS 

You can get specific results from 
a public service campaign — and 
quickly — as well as from a com- 
mercial schedule. 

Y\ LBB. Baltimore, which programs 
100' i to the large Negro population 
there, shows how the station sparked 
a drive to cut down the incidence of 
polio among Negro children by urging 
Salk vaccine shots. 

The polio rate was two and a half 
limes greater among Negro youngsters 
than among white, prompting the sta- 
tion to use its facilities and personnel 
to air media and inoculation direc- 
tions. 

The cit\ health department credits 
WEBB with having overcome unfavor- 
able publicity given to a vaccine manu- 
facturer, the children's fear of the 
hypodermic needle and the expense of 
inoculation. 

As the Negro population shifts 
and moves, and increases in size 
and buying power, radio stations 
are adding more Negro-appeal 
programing. 

Shift in programing at KPDQ. 
Portland. Ore., follows this trend as 
the station aims its entire music sched- 
ule to a metro area Negro population 
of 30.000. It's new slogan: the TNT 
station — Tones 'n Tempos, (sponsor's 
6th annual report on Negro radio and 
the Negro market will be published in 
September. I 

It's not only spot and network ra- 
dio which is booming: local bill- 
ings are on the upgrade, too. 

\\ \ NJ. Newark, reports its billings 
were up 10' < in January, 15$ in Feb- 




► 


GO 


rj 



. I 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 




BEST v SHOT 
OF THE >f£AR 










n\cr$ 

5AUCS 




IN USE 20 JULY 

AD OCfctUNfc 2 JUL* 



Things are hatching 
in the 
WREN's 
Nest! 





TO TIME BUYERS 
LOOKING 

FOR 
A BUSY 
SIGNAL 

Metropolitan Topeka is proud of its 
steady, high payrolls — like Southwest- 
ern Bell's 1,200 employees. The com- 
pany has already added three stories 
to the new building opened in 1951, 
and in addition has two suburban of- 
fices in the mill. Nearly 10 per cent 
of all Kansas construction for South- 
western Bell is slated for Topeka in 
1957. Topeka is a mark3t worth having 
. . . and WREN is the low-cost way to 
get it. Nielsen's latest, credits WREN 
with 42 per cent of all Topeka homes 
every single day! 

REP. BY JOHN E. PEARSON 




5000 WATTS 
TOPEKA, KANSAS 



ruarv, 30% in March, more than 
1U(!' ( in \pril i in each case, vs. the 
same time a year ago I . 

\\ hy such a jump? Conversion to 
Great Albums of Music minus disk 
jockej appeals says Manager Ivon B. 
Newman. And these gains despite a 
30% rate hike. 

WWEZ, New Orleans, bagged 19 
new accounts with a simple and inex- 
pensive audience promotion. It had 
an Easter Parade, complete with an 
egg hunt, free chicks for kiddies and 
a parade. 

Forty-three advertisers shared in 
sponsorship of parade remotes and the 
hunt for 1,000 eggs spotted in 13 loca- 
tions. Of the 19 new WWEZ clients, 
14 had never used anv radio. 



FILM 

AAP's new overseas setup not onlv 
underlines the tv sales potential for tv 
film distributors but the theatrical, pro- 
duction, literary and merchandising 
parlays that can accrue. 

The firm, distributors of pre-1948 
Warner Bros, features and shorts, just 
announced the setting up of an East- 
ern Hemisphere operation under Nor- 
man Katz, director of AAP's foreign 
department and executive vice presi- 
dent of Dominant Pictures, its theatri- 
cal distributing subsidiary. 

The plan is for foreign AAP compa- 
nies to utilize all the rights AAP ac- 
quired with the motion picture nega- 
tives. This includes literary rights for 
live theatrical, tv and radio production 
and licensing of merchandising rights 
similar to the Popeye arrangements in 
effect in the U.S. 

AAP will also invest money in over- 
seas production of film for theatres 
and tv in Europe and tv in the U.S. as 
well as keep an eye open for profitable 
tv station operations. 

The distributor recently concluded 
a $6 million deal with a syndicate I in 
which AAP retains an interest) which 
will distribute AAP product in Latin 
America. 

A potent argument for reruns has 
recently been researched bv MCA- 
TV. 

The firm just completed a survey of 
eight cities where first and second runs 
of Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal have 
been shown. ARB figures for March 
1957, covering second runs of the 
show, reveal an average of 29.4. This 



compares with a first run average of 
24.7 in March 1956. 

One of the biggest tv time sales in 
the Southeast has been pulled off by 
\\ SM-TV. Nashville, in selling fea- 
tures to a super market chain. 

The client: Cooper-Martin Stores, 
with 13 outlets in the Nashville area. 
The bu\ : first run features Monday- 
through-Friday from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. 
and Sunda\ night at 9:30 plus a week- 
da\ spot campaign. The deal is for 
52 weeks and the series will be called 
Home Folks Theatre. 

The show is designed as both a 
prestige and sales builder. Brands car- 
ried by Cooper-Martin stores will par- 
ticipate. 

COMMERCIALS 

Piel's Beer, Ford and Chesterfield 

tv commercials are win, place and 
show in audience popularity for March. 
American Research Bureau asked 
diarykeepers to name the tv commer- 
cial that pleased them most during the 
month. Here are the top 18 in ARB s 
best-liked commercials during week of 




J> DAV/S 



Merer mind the uranium. 

Charlie, u-ait 'til you hear what's 

happening at If'PTR. 



76 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



Famous on the Georgia Scene 




LAKE CHATUGE, luring fishermen to its bass-filled waters, 
lies tucked away among the gently sloping mountains of 
northeast Georgia — an area fully covered by WAGA-TV, 
also famous on the Georgia scene. Covering more than half 
the state's population with over half of the retail sales and 
spendable income, WAGA-TV consistently gains top ARB 
and Pulse ratings. It's the No. 1 television station in the 
Southeast's No. 1 market. 




STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY SALES OFFICES 

NEW YORK-625 Madison Ave. • CHICAGO-230 N Michigan Av; • SAN FRANCISCO-111 Sutter St 




«presented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 



1 to 7 March: Piel s Beer, Ford, 
Chesterfield, Hamms Beer, I puna. 
Dodge, VN inston, Alka-Seltzer, tvo 
r\ Soap. Plymouth, Revlon, Toni, 
L&M, Genera] Electric, Snowdrift, 
Rheingold Beer, Kleenex, Lucky 
Strike. Prom Permanent and 
Schlitz. 

I lie latter two made the favorite 
i ommercials list for the first time since 
monthl) survey began last Max. 

Television commercials are now 
getting the same "sneak preview"* 
tryouts that are given Hollywood 
feature films. 

\t the Palms Theatre in Culver Citj 
and at the Panorama Theatre in Van 
\u\s. three recently-produced com- 
mercials for New Blue Dutch were 
shown, and movie fans filled out audi- 
ence reaction cards. 

The commercials were done for Pu- 
rex Corp. 1>\ I l'\ for use on NBC's 
Arthur Murray Houseparty show this 
Mimiuer. Price-Waterhouse is auditing 
the pre\ iew cards. 



Walter 1. ( w allv) Gould has joined 
I'elevision Programs ol America, Inc. 
as producer in charge of its new ex- 
pani'cd t\ commercial division. TPA's 
main film studios are in Hollywood, 
hut Gould will headquarter in New 
York. 

The new di\ision will produce com- 
mercials as well as show openings and 
closings on location or in local studios. 
Gould, a former Hollywood script writ- 
er, wrote and produced Beulah for 
Ethel Waters on tv together with other 
shows and commercials for Reynolds 
Tobacco, Colgate. L&M. and Rev- 
lon. 

In the three months since it formed 
its commercial and industrial film de- 
partment, MGM-TY reports contracts 
totaling more than $400 thousand 
have been completed. This includes 46 
t\ commercials and one industrial. 
Among the commercials are Knicker- 
bocker Beer through Warwick & Leg- 
ler, Helene Curtis and Mavbelline 
through Gorden Best Agency, Formfit 
Foundations and Alemite through 



FOLLOW THE LEADER 
IN SACRAMENTO... 






KCRA-tv 

49.1% 




A graphic der 

KCRA-TV's rise 

Audience fror 

Sign-off, Sundc 

Ask Petry about The 

Highest Rated NBC 

Station in the West. 

•ARB. Sacramento 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Serving 28 Northern California 
and Nevada Counties 



CHANNEL 



\Ia< Farland Aveyard Agency. Com- 
pany now estimates a $2 million \ear 
for this new department. 
French adaptations of l. S.-pro- 
duced t\ commercial films are now of- 
fered through Robert Larence Produc- 
tions, Ltd.. Toronto. Canada. Soun.l 
tracks are available on ' j ". 16 urn and 
•'i") mm magnetic and optical tape. 
Cummings Productions. Inc.. New 
York, creators and recorders of sing- 
ing commercials, has set up two new 
departments to produce commercials 
and industrial films. 

REPS 

Adam Young, president of the 
radio-tv station rep firm, last week 
was one of 1 1 men to receive the 
Horatio Alger Award. 

^ oung was elected b\ vote of 3,000 
students from the 500 members of the 
American Schools and Colleges Asso- 
ciation. 

Young started in the broadcast in- 
dustry as a page boj at NBC. 

The OK station group of five ra- 
dio facilities has named Stars 
National. Inc. as its station repre- 
sentative. 

The five outlets: WBOK. New Or- 
leans: WLOK. Memphis: KAOK. Lake 
Charles. La.: WXOK. Baton Rouge; 
KYOK. Houston. 

Personnel additions: For Edward 
Petry: Biil Oldham switches to the 
St. Louis office as sales manager from 
Chicago, where he was a radio ac- 
count executive: Austen Smithers 
takes over the Chicago opening after 
resigning as radio sales manager of 
Headley-Reed station reps. 
At John Blair & Co.: Tom Boise 
resigns as manager of KSFD. San Di- 
ego, to work as an account executive 
in the Los Angeles office: Arthur 
Yigeland leaves Ted Bates ad agency . 
New York, where he was account man 
on Kool cigarettes, to be a salesman 
in the New ^ ork office. 
At Everett-McKinney : Dale Ste- 
vens joins the tv-radio sales staff in 
Chicago. 

RESEARCH 

Tv*s audience keeps going up. up. 
up. So says TvB. reporting that 
the daytime network advertiser in 
\i7 is reaching a 9% bigger audi- 



SPONSOR 



li! \m 1957 




wfmy-tv 
maximum 
power on 
channel 2 

greensboro, n. c. 






the winncili • • 



Here in the Prosperous Piedmont section of North Carolina and 

Virginia, your sales message gets home "first" with the '"most" impact 

when you buy WFMY-TV. Put your product in the winner's 

circle — every time - by calling your H-R-P man today for full details 

of WFMY-TVs great market. 



UJt 





Greensboro 


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Winston-Solem 




Durham 




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Salisbury 




Re.dsville 




Chapel Hill 




Pinehurst 




Southern Pines 




Fort Bragg 




Sanford 




Mortinsville. Va 


- - ■*" 


Danville, Va. 



WFMY-TV . . . Pied Piper of the Piedmont 
"First with LIVE TV in the Carolines" 



50 Prosperous Counties 
$2.7 Billion Market 



2.1 Million Population 
$2.1 Billion Retail Sales 



uifmij-tv 




/r/////f 




GREENSBORO. N. C 

Repreiented by 

Harrington. Righter & Parsons. Inc. 

New York Chicago San Francisco Atlanta 




Since 1°49 



SPONSOR • L8 M \Y 1957 



MEMO: 



TIMEBUYERS! 



You must use the most POWERFUL 
Station in Northeastern Pennsyl- 
vania's Rich 17 County Area to 
really cover the market. 

* WILK-TV Reaches better than 
85% of the 314,984 sets in its cov- 
erage area! 

* WILK-TV Reaches more com- 
munity cable subscribers than any 
other station in the Willtes-Barre- 
Scranton Area! 

X WILK-TV Provides clearer 
"line-of-sight" to all important sur- 
rounding population centers than 
any other Station in the area! 

K WILK-TV Carries your mes- 
sage from Reading to New York 
State — from Lock Haven-Williams- 
port Area to New Jersey! 

1 MILLION + WATTS 

GET THE FACTS! 



Wilkes-Barre 
Scranton 

Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



Art 

MOSBY'S stations 

blanket Western 

MONTANA 



Daytime — 



KGVO 



5,000 watts — CBS 
Nighttime — 

1 K-MSO-TV ! 

CBS 
191,000 watts — NBC 

ABC 

• 

Either Radio or TV, 

when you think of 

Montana 

Think of Mosby, Inc. 

at 

Missoula, Mont. 



80 



ence than in \56; the nighttime 
buyer, 20% more. 

Gains in homes reached are, respec- 
tively, 283,000 and 1.5 million. Week- 
ii;i\ audience gain in the two-year span 
from '55 to '57 is 28% ; for the aver- 
age nighttime show, 41%. 

This marked advance in davtime 
tune in is of special interest to adver- 
tisers this year as nighttime blocks 
close up. 

"N isnal advertising" — print or tv 
— isn't producing the kind of 
brand identification automotive 
manufaeturers want. 

So says Jack Hardest). \ .p. -general 
manager of Radio Advertising Bureau. 
He spoke to the Adcraft Club of De- 
troit on results of an RAB survey. 
Findings: A five-brand study of '56 
cars shows only 50% of all car owners 
interviewed could correctly identify the 
make after seeing a full profile photo- 
graph in detail and color. 

Even fewer non-car owners could 
name the manufacturer. 

Blasting automotives' stress on visu- 
al advertising, he said these results 
show the fallacy of relying on product 
pictures. The most effective car pic- 
ture which can be "implanted," he 
says, is the mental image radio creates. 

Four of the top 10 tv shows 
dropped out of position between 
April '56 and '57 — a significant 
40% loss. 

They were, according to American 
Research Bureau, Red Skelton (from 
7 to 11) ; Bob Hope Chevy Show 
I from 5); Lawrence Welk (from a 
tie at 7) ; Person to Person, from 10. 
Symbols influence people sub- 
consciously, and the tv advertiser 
might well look to hidden mean- 
ings of words as well as to his 
dictionary. 

Dr. Ernest Dichter. president of the 
Institute for Motivational Research, 
says there's a "secret language" of ads 
which gives words their psvchological 
impact. 

These latent meanings originate in 
symbolism, he says — "in the mood and 
associative world of an ad." Some 
symbolic examples: 

Rounded, open forms and curves 
are feminine: sharp, angular features 
are masculine: straight lines symbolize 
restriction and authority: exposure of 
the previously hidden symbolizes bold- 
ness and freedom, but exposure of the 



natuialK hidden symbolizes violation 
and creates fear, disgust and ( inter- 
esting i curiosit) . 

FINANCIAL 

Here are the first quarter reports 
from some of the major air media 
advertisers: 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco reports 
sales of $236,612,000 as against $213,- 
201,000 in the first quarter of 1956. 
Net earnings compared $15,360,000 to 
$13,565,000 for the period last year. 

Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical 

Co. sales went to $40,100,000 com- 
pared to $36,500,000 for the first quar- 
ter in the previous year. 

American Home Products reports 
net profits of $9,431,170 for the first 
quarter of 1957 as against $7,155,634 
for the previous year's first quarter. 

Miles Laboratories net income for 
the first quarter of this year reached 
$847,204 against $755,819 for the 

same period a year earlier. 

Procter & Gamble net profits for 
the nine month period ending with 
March was $51,520,833 corresponding 
with $47,452,816 for the same period 
of the previous year. 

Standard Brands' net sales hit $129,- 
361,348 for the first quarter of 1957 
as against $117,873,993 for the com- 
parable 1956 period. Net income 
reached $3,612,453 as against $3,016,- 
300. 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merril Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 





Tues. 


Tues. 


Net 


Stock 


7 May 


14 May 


Change 


New York Stock Exchange 




AB-FT 


24 >s 


24% 


+ % 


AT&T 


177 1 - 


178% 


+ 1 


Avco 


6% 


fi-\ 




CBS "A" 


34% 


35% 


+ 1 


Columbia Pic. 


IK 1 . 


17"s 


- % 


Loew'j 


20% 


19% 


+1 


Paramount 


54% 


35% 


+ % 


RCA 


36% 


38% 


+2% 


Storer 


26 T s 


28 


+ 1% 


20th -Fox 


27 ;i , 


27-'s 


- % 


Warner Bros. 


25% 


25% 


- % 


Westinghouse 


59 's 


bW 


+1% 


American Stock Exchange 




Allied Artists 


1% 


3% 


- % 


C&C Super 


■■■> 


% 




Du.Mont Labs. 


5 


5% 


+ % 


Guild Film? 


3% 


\ 


+ % 


NTA 


8\ 


8% 


- % 


SPONSOR • 


18 \m 


1957 



ED MEATH 







"Musical Clock" 

6-9:30 A.M. Mon. thru Sat. 



Rochester's long-time top-favorite disc jockey 
dominates our morning program schedule 
which averages, from 6:00 A.M. to Noon. . . 



"Lloyd's Unlimited" 



3:30-6 P.M. Mon. thru Fri. 

Only one year in Rochester, bui zooming in 
popularity, Lloyd heads up mn afternoon 
line-up which averages, noon to 6:00 P.M. . . . 



24% 



. . . and, beside rating FIRST in share of audience in 
the morning, and FIRST in the afternoon, we really 
ought to mention that we're FIRST evenings, tool 



23% 




LATEST ROCHESTER 
PULSE REPORT 
MARCH 1957 



ofwcksfer 



NEW YORK 
5,000 WATTS 



Representatives: EVERETT- McKINNEY Inc. New York, Chicago, LEE F. O'CONNEll CO., Lo% Anqclr-s Son Francisco 






SPONSOR 



18 MAY 1957 



81 



PITTSBURGH 




WFBG-TVs Unduplicated 
Primary Area 



WFBG-TVs and Station B's 
Duplicated Primary Area 



Pittsburgh's Primary Area 



30 of the Top 40 Shows 




76,701 more TV homes from PITTSBURGH to HARRISBURG 

It's as easy as ARB! TOP PROGRAMS plus TOP AUDIENCE make 

WFBG-TV, Altoona, your number ONE choice from Pittsburgh to 

Harrisburg. ARB proves WFBG-TV has 30 of the top 40 shows ... proves 

that WFBG-TV delivers 76,701 more TV homes in combination with 

Pittsburgh . . . proves that WFBG-TV delivers average audiences 30. 1 9c 

greater than Johnstown; 71. 49< more quarter-hour firsts. Buzz BLAIR for \mv W m K'9 ^3 "" 1* 

proof: ARB. Altoona, Nov. 1956; ARB, Altoona Coverage Study, Mar. 1956. ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ONLY BASIC CBS-TV STATION SERVING THE AREA j§ft channel 10 

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Represented by BLAIR -TV 

operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AMiFMiTV, Philadelphia, Pa./wNBF-AM»FM»TV, Blnghamton, N. Y. 
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National Sales Office, 4 8 5 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 



::2 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



Wluil's happening in U. S. Government 
tluit affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 






cwi|ht A iM7 Look to Sen. Estes Kefauver jarring the Industrial (at well .i-, the network 

sponsor publications inc. world if he mi leashes a price-regulat in» proposal be i- reported i" 1-- cooking op. 

The mill of Kefauver'a plan: Put an) company thai does L0%, or more, of all the 
dollar bnsinesa in \i- field under some sort of price regulation. 

Such a curb could affect CBS TV. That u network, according to I'll!, did over 45% 
of all tin- business in its field in 1956. 



The Senate Commerce and House Judiciary antitrust committees continue t<» 

wrestle with their long-awaited and oft-delayed network probe report-. 

There's less confusion in the Senate group than on the House side. 

The report issuance situation in either camp this week shaped up thus: 

HOUSE ANTITRUST COMMITTEE: Chain,. a.. Emanuel Celler is determined to 
get out the report as quickly as possible. So far, according to reliable sources, ever 
thing has been resolved except the stand on BMI — with Celler meeting no little resistance to- 
ward his views of the music licensing organization. 

This is not to imply that there's complete agreement within the committee, A strong mi- 
nority report is almost certain — as previously indicated b\ \\ \SH1.\GT()\ Wl.l K.. 

Celler knows that such a report will pull the teeth from the majority docu- 
ment, since it will divide the committee along political lines. 

Even with the prospect of having to settle for two reports, the committee's staff is being 
forced to soften the majority document in order to gain enough signatures. 

As it stood originally, the majority report was a bitter indictment of such network prac- 
tices as option time and must-buys. It was equally strong in its condemnation of the FCC, 
with particular respect to the commission's approval without hearing of the Westinghouse- 
NBC swap-trade. This transaction is now in the courts via a Justice Department antitrust 
action. 

SENATE COMMERCE COMMITTEE: .Nicholas Zapple has problems of bis own 

with the report prepared by special counsel Kenneth Cox and himself. I he i i r-t report, in- 
volving a plea for trial of pay-tv, was put on the shelf. Now the documenl dealing 
with network practices is under scrutiny from several quarters. 

Sen. John Bricker wants to be sure the report calls for FCC regulation of the networks. 
Sens. John Pastore and committee chairman Warren Magnuson want to be -urc there a nol too 
much biting at the FCC. 

Three routes are open on this report — which is also critical of some network prai I 
but more restrainedly than Celler's: 

1) Approval by a majority of the committee — therebj giving it the prest 
committee report. 

2) Issuance simply as a staff report, because of failure to gain sufficient agreement. 

3) Temporary shelving, like the pay-tv issue 

Commissioners Doerfer and Lee remain hot choices to succeed to the I I I 
chairmanship, but the race for George C. McConnaughey's seat is wide open. 

Edward K. Mills. Jr.. of New Jersey, turned the spot down last week after it generally 
was assumed that he was a shoo-in. 

SPONSOR • 18 may 1957 83 



it 



GETTING THE MOST FRC 



*£"^**Inn| 



Snagged" by a 
Faulty Film Situation ? 

If so, you've a right to be "hopping mad" — 
especially if picture "smog," inflexible film pres- 
entations and high operating costs are blocking 
your progress. Better do something about it. 




84 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1957 



UR FILM DOLLAR... 



«•»«"' 




Can You Answer 



to all 



these Questions? 

1. Does your present film equipment give you a snow- 
free picture, approaching the live quality that adver- 
tisers want ? 

2. Does it assure low operating cost at the same time? 

3. Does your film system provide for varied program 
fare to hold viewer interest ? 



— If your answer is "no" to any of these questions, 
let us show you how to plan your system to get 
these desired advantages. See your RCA Broadcast 
Representative. Have him acquaint you with RCA's 
comprehensive TV Film Facilities — for getting bet- 
ter pictures and lower operating costs for both 
Color and Monochrome. 





Tmk(s) ® 






SPONSOR 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, N. J. 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Ltd., Montreal 



18 MAY 1957 



85 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



bhwum « ^ network president is so bent on getting the post-1950 product of a major 

•ponsou publication* i «a feature film distributor that he's dangling this bait: 

Let the distributor make a bulk buy of the network's time and sell the time- 
film package to advertisers. 

Media buyers should take heart from what a management consultant firm says about 
them after probing an agency's operations: 

They were assayed as ultra-high in diligence, conscientiousness, enthusiasm, and 
progressiveness. 

If McCann-Erickson is not in the news so much these days as several months ago, 
it's partly because it has reached the leveling-off stage that usually follows a meteoric 
rise. 

With its machinery in synchronization, the important goal now is to solidify its 
position and work on the profits column. 

Madison Avenue is working up a glow out of the fact four charmer-vocalists 
are set to head up their own weekly tv programs. It could give the season a lift and 
more class. 

The quartet: Dinah Shore (Chevrolet); Patrice Munsel (Buick) ; Gisele MacKen- 
zie (Scott Paper-Schick) ; and Patti Page (Kellogg-Pillsbury-Oldsmobile) . 

(Incidentally — as SPONSOR-SCOPE has reported before — singers, fronting flashy 
shows, should have quite a vogue this fall.) 

One major agency would be very thankful if a certain tv network sales ex- 
ecutive would exercise more restraint when meeting with its clients. He is too prone to: 

1) "Lecture" them on the subject of tv. 

2) Emote so enthusiastically that the client hasn't a chance to state his own prob- 
lems and preferences. 

3) Cut short the client's time to digest the pitch. 

DuPont is prospecting for a fall radio show that will appeal to hunters. 

CBS Radio's sports department meanwhile is on the prowl for a name in that field. 
BBDO will place the business. 

Network nadio — all live until Bing Crosby broke through the barrier on ABC — had 
a number of "first nights" whose glamor and excitement demonstrated the emo- 
tional kinship between Broadway and an earlier, more flamboyant Hollywood. 

Trade veterans digging back in their memories for such occasions would be likely to 
include these premieres: 

• The Kraft Music Hall, which opened with a two-hour show, presided over by Paul 
Whiteman and ballyhooed with page ads in newspapers. 

• Texaco's debut of Ed Wynn on the old Ziegfeld Roof. 

• Al Jolson's ushering in of the Shell Chateau. 

• Fanny Brice's magnificent display of many-sided talent for Chase & Sanborn. 

• Esso's innovation of five different types of shows — all star-studded — on a regular week- 
ly schedule. 



86 



SPONSOR • 18 MAY 1957 




these are clean livin' folks! 

And the whole durn family does everything in a big way Saturd 
bath included!^ Doesn't really matter if you're sellin'soap or 

shoestrings; folks like these buy lots of stuff they hear about on 
KXLA. most listened to 24-hour country and western music station. 

10,000 watts covering the greater Los Angeles market fRT ^fJT # Sk 

represented nationally by Burke-Stuart Co., New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco 



OVER-COMMERCIAL ? 

(Continued Irani page 39) 

stead <>f parking (' a.m. to 6 p.m. slots. 
More careful supervision of pro- 
graming. Keep an e\e on those disk 
jockeys who lend to yak-yak too much 
during a show, run out of time and 
then frantically bunch their remaining 
announcements in the waning minutes. 
There are main among both buyers 
and sellers who agree with Brent that 
programing is one of the keys to the 
puzzle. \ poorK -handled program with 
onl\ 111 announcements can sound 
more pvercommercialized than a well- 
handled show with 20. A lot of show 
personalities can match up commer- 
cials for two compatible products 
(such as soft drink and pretzels I and 
put them back to back with a strong 
tie-up. heightening the effectiveness of 
both. The increasing number of light 
touch "talk" commercials is enabling 
some clever d.j.'s to alternate these 
with singing commercials, so that the 
listener is not too aware of the short 
time between commercials. (See 
"Should you get on radio's comed\ 
commercial bandwagon?". SPONSOR 11 
May.) 

As for protective separations, com- 
petitive products and conflicting copy 
themes are not the only considerations. 
There also is the problem of separat- 
ing two non-competitive — but incom- 
patible — products, such as floor wax 
and peanut butter. Station traffic de- 
partments and show stars can do a lot 
to smooth out their commercial slot- 
ting if they have, or take, adequate 
time to plan their programs. 

"In order to be good, a station must 
have a character," says Jerry Sachs, 
Doyle Dane Bernbach timebuyer. 
"And in order to establish such char- 
acter, it needs programing. When it 
crams too many spots into too little 
time, programing goes out the win- 
dow — and the station has lost its char- 
acter." (One of the reasons advanced 
b) magazine experts for the death of 
Collier's was its lack of character, i 

"Ads strung together," Sachs con- 
tinued, "are nothing but a shopping 
guide. And a shopping guide is not 
programing." 

Sachs, who is as much concerned 
with "overcommercialization" of radio 
as is anyone else in the business, takes 
an objective view of the problem. It's 
a problem both broadcasters and ad- 
vertisers must join forces to lick. 

"Advertisers have got to stop their 
clamoring for these prime hours. 



They've got to face the fact that radio 
selling is a cumulative thing: you chip 
awaj at a small piece of audience at a 
lime, then you go to another hour and 
chip awaj at another audience: 7 to 9 
a.m. is not an umbrella that covers 
everybody. 

"Then there are the broadcasters. 
I he\ ve got a big selling job to do. 
They ve got to acquaint advertisers 
with the other hours in the radio day. 
They've got to come up with solid re- 
search to prove these other hours are 
good buys. They've got to develop 
I letter packages to attract advertisers 
into spreading out." 

Until such missionarv work takes 
hold, what of the immediate program- 
ing? Are shows and advertisers both 
suffering from announcement over- 
crowding? What of the listening 
housewife who may be bombarded by 
as many as 200 separate commercial 
impressions before she sets out on her 
trip to the super market? 

How the audience reacts 

"Chances are," says Albert Shepard. 
executive vice president and director 
of tv testing MRP (Motivating Re- 
sponse Patterns), "she just won't listen 
to them all. but will pick out of the fog 
of commercials only those she wants to 
hear. However, there is no general 
rule; a lot depends on specific prod- 
ucts and special situations." 

A. C. Nielsen Co. reports that, in tv. 
minute-by-minute curves indicate no 
appreciable tune-out at commercial 
times. Thus it would seem that tune- 
out is influenced by programing — not 
commercials. 

In 1949, Schwerin Research Corp. 
measured for a network the effect of 
increasing the number of commercials 
in daytime programs. They ran 
matched-sample tests in the same show, 
the first time with five commercials 
and the second time doubling that 
number. All the commercials were ap- 
proximately one minute in length. In 
Test I, the commercial time was in a 
relationship of about one to eight to 
the entertainment, while in Test II re- 
lationship was roughly one to three- 
and-a-half. 

The study indicated that the larger 
number of commercials had an adverse 
effect on liking for the show, the loss 
being 9% . I See chart, page 39. i 

"While the climate of radio listen- 
ing has obviously changed since this 
stud\. Schwerin Research points out. 
"it assuredly is not more favorable to- 



ward saturation use of commercials." 
None of these pieces of research 
presents too alarming a picture. Yet 
the "overcommercialization" battle 
goes on. 

"Radio was entirely too holy in the 
old days," said one hroadcaster. "They 
fell over backward trying not to dou- 
ble-spot. Then along came tv which 
went blatantly ahead piling up hitch- 
hikes and cowcatchers and I.D.'s and 
station breaks until it sometimes winds 
up with five commercials in a row. 
\\ In the hell should radio be expected 
to be so moral about this thing?" 

"No station is over-commercialized." 
said another, "if you look at it over a 
12 or 18 hour period. It's all due to 
timebuyers getting such ultimatums 
from clients as. 'You will buy 7 to 9 
a.m. and 4 to C p.m., and you will ac- 
cept no substitutes!' ' 

Perhaps the whole subject was best 
summed up by Paul Weeks, vice presi- 
dent of H-R Representatives, Inc.. 
v hen he told sponsor: 

"Retention is influenced by a great 
manv factors other than the number of 
different impressions received within 
a given period of time. In fact, the 
number of commercials probably is 
one of the less important factors. 

"It is too easv to generalize about 
the commercial load of a program. 
Commercial load is a highly relative 
term, and depends a great deal on the 
calibre of the broadcaster. 

"In some cases, it is merely force of 
habit on the part of even some of the 
most astute clients who confine their 
agencies to the well-trodden boards 
and so prevent them from making crea- 
tive, selective buvs in a variety of time 
periods which would yield optimum 
usable audiences. 

"Creative, selective buying is one- 
half the combination to unlock the real 
potential of radio advertising. The 
other half is creative, impact-making 
commercials. 

"Several years ago." Weeks conclud- 
ed, "when radio had been officially 
pronounced dead, it was the success of 
a handful of intrepid and imaginative 
agencies who knew better which star- 
tled the erstwhile crepe-hangers back 
into the fold. It is these very pioneers 
who now find things crowded, remem- 
bering as the) do the days when there 
was lots of elbow room on their re- 
discovered medium. It may well be 
that these same pioneers will go forth 
again in 1957 to conquer new worlds 
and new time periods." ^ 



;;;; 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 







The twamplandi of 
northern Michigan are 
home, sueet home to this 
20 pound bundle of fer- 
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Original sketch 
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Here's your Real Target 

Seventy per cent oj Michigan's population 
commanding 75 per cent of the state's 
buying power lives uithin W'W'J's daytime 
primary coverage area. In the Detroit area 
alone, over 3 l _> million people spend over 
$5 billion annually for retail goods. 



WWJ RADIO 

WORLD'S FIRST RADIO STATION 

Owned and operated by The Detroit News 

Notiono/ Representatives Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



NBC Affiliate 



SPONSOR 



18 may L957 



89 




• Mississippi's ONLY Negro Station 

• In Jackson— 45% Negro 

• Top Hooperated — consistently 

• The ONLY way to the 72,000 
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Buy Both These Exclusive 
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Reps at work 




Al Miranda, The katz \gencv. New York. -a\»: "Main adver- 
sers and agencv executives don't use spot t\ because thev fear thev 
won't be able to buv good time slots. In general, more desirable time 
periods are available toda) than at any time in recent years. Not 
onl) are good daytime announcements and I.D.'s open, but even in 
prime evening hours good adja- 
cencies and program times are 
available. The over-all efficiency 
of spot tv is well known to main 
advertisers, yet others feel they 
must use the network nighttime 
half-hour program unit as their 
basic advertising buy. The Katz 
Agency is preparing data which 
we think will firmlv demonstrate 
basic reasons why most advertis- 
ers should buy spot first — not net- 
work — for nighttime hours. With 

increased network tv costs, market-by-market placement offers the 
advertiser a better, more logical way to buy. Naturally, it is im- 
portant for the advertiser to set up budgets well in advance to secure 
favorable positions in any medium. Such attention pays off to a 
greater extent in spot television franchises than is possible in any 
other medium, as more advertisers and agencies are finding out. 



Ed Lier, Avery-Knodel, Inc.. New York, comments: "'Many adver- 
tisers might not lie aware of the tremendous frequency of impres- 
sion they can get using 10-second I.D.'s during the daytime with a 
spot budget no greater than that required for. sav. two nighttime 20- 
second spots. On the average, an advertiser can buy 20 daytime 

I.D.'s — with at least a 10.0 aver- 
age rating — for the cost of two 
nighttime chainbreaks. This is 
based on a rate and saturation re- 
v ieu of most tv stations we repre- 
sent. In some markets the fre- 
quency is greater. In Oklahoma 
City, it's 29. In Lincoln. Neb., 27. 
L^ '*} In Rock Island, as many as 32! 

J§{>-.^ And what better time is there than 

flS ■ 'm « HI davtime hours just before house- 

JK jgm wives shop. \\ ith self-service re- 

tailing and impulse buying, day- 
time saturation increases package identification, brand-demand and. 
as a result, volume sales too. Some products require longer an- 
nouncements, of course. Let your other spot t\ advertising do this. 
Simply replan your campaign. I se fewer nighttime spots and add 
I. I). saturation with higher cumulative ratings. Then a measure of 
vour campaign bj anv yardstick — will prove its increased efliciencv." 




SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



DICTIONARY OF SYN 




Top „«„,„.,, ._„ 

Check local advertisers — use any measure you choose. You 11 find \\ SM- 1 \ to be 
the number one station in the Nashville market. 
Irving Waugh or any Petry man can supply the proof. 



Channel 4, Nashville. Tenn.« NBC-TV Affiliate* Clearly Nashville's --= I TV Station 
IRVING WAUGH, Commercial Manager* EDWARD PETRY & CO., National Advertising Representatives 
WSM-TV's sister station - Clear Channel 50,000-wart WSM Radio - is the only single medium that covers completely the rich Central South market. 



WSM-TV 




. . . with audience 

• 15 of the top 16 weekly shows 

• 7 of the top 10 multi-weeklys 

• 46% share of audience 
(Feb. '57 ARB) 

. . . with coverage 

• Documented proof of superior 
30-county coverage! 

Represented Nationally by CBS-TV SPOT SALES 

K6IM-TV 

DOMINANT IN THE 
OREGON MARKET 



92 




Tv and radio 

NEWSMAKERS 




Tom W. Judge has been appointed to the 
newl) created office of national televi- 
sion sales manager for the Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. His appointment follows 
the naming of Perry B. Bascom to a 
similar post for radio several weeks ago. 
Judge started in the broadcast industry as 
a salesman for WBZ-TV, Westinghouse's 
Boston station. He then went to CBS TV 
spot sales where he was an account executive for four \ears, then 
midwestern sales manager, and later was advanced to the posi- 
tion of eastern sales manager. He then moved over to Closed 
Circuit Telecasting. Inc., as vice president in charge of sales. 
Judge resigned from Closed Circuit this week to join Westinghouse. 
Prior to entering tv, he covered the midwest as a retail representa- 
tive for Life, where he specialized in field merchandising campaigns. 

Ceorge Weissman, Philip Morris vice 
president, has been named director of mar- 
keting for the cigarette firm. Weissman's 
appointment signals Philip Morris' change- 
over to the marketing organizational con- 
cept. In the newly created post he will 
be responsible for directing and coordi- 
nating sales, advertising, market research, 
packaging and public relations. He will 

report directly to executive vice president. Joseph F. Cullman. III. 
Weissman is a former newspaperman and public relations executive 
and has been associated with Philip Morris since 1948 when he was 
account executive for Benjamin Sonnenberg. publicity consultants 
for the cigarette firm. He joined Philip Morris in June. 1952 as 
assistant to the president and director of public relations. Named to 
aid Weissman is Ross R. Millhiser. new assistant dir. of marketing. 

Raymond W. Welpotfr, former station 
manager for WRGB. Schenectady, will join 
the WKY Television System, Inc., on 3 
June as station manager for WKY AM & 
TV, Oklahoma City. Announcement of 
Welpott's appointment was released this 
week by E. K. Gaylord. president and gen- 
eral manager of the stations and also of 
the Oklahoma Publishing Co. Welpott. 
who joined the General Electric Co. in 1938. entered the broadcast 
field in 1941 as broadcasting accountant for the General Electric sta- 
tions in the Schenectady area. Later, in 1946 he was appointed assist- 
ant to manager of G.E.'s WGY and WRGB. In 1955 Welpott was 
made manager of WRGB. the tv outlet. In taking over position of 
stations manager for the WKY Television System. Wellpott fills 
vacancy created by death of Hoyt Andres in middle of last month. 





SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



RS 



IoiJk 

n 

hen 

■ 
a- 



WG R -TV 
SELLS 



q 




ABC AFFILIATE CHANNEL 2 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



sponsor . 18 mu 1957 



03 



SPONSOR 



Horatio Alger story 

The first time we met Adam Young he impressed us as an 
intense, hard-working young rep -alcsinan. That was in 1942. 

Last week Adam Young, now President of Young Tele- 
\ i-ion Corp, was one of eleven successful Americans selected 
to receive the famous Horatio Alger awards. He was in good 
company. Men like Gwilym A. Price, President and Board 
Chairman of Westinghouse; Joyce C. Hall, President of Hall- 
mark Greeting Card Company; John Ware, President of the 
American Water Works, were among the recipients. 

Adam Young opened his own firm ten years ago. As John 
Blair, President of John Blair Company, put it: "The honor 
that has come to Adam is a reflection on the prestige and im- 
portance of the entire station representative business." 

As Mr. Young received his plaque from General David 
Sarnoff, himself a former Horatio Alger Award winner, he 
probably reflected on the remarkable growth of the radio and 
television representative business. Today, a station represen- 
tative renders services that weren't heard of five years ago. 
This is the American system at work and Adam Young, for 
the past two years President of Station Representatives Asso- 
ciation, is an exemplary figure in an essential facet of it. 

Make ratings week secret 

Pulse has taken an important step to minimize the artificial 
hypoing which many stations do during "ratings week." It 
has asked its station subscribers in markets where ratings are 
done irregularly to report any special promotion activity, 
warning that this will be noted on the rating report. 

This helps. Stations now know that users of the ratings will 
be reminded that the ratings may be inflated. But why not go 
a big step further? The ratings week itself should be a well 
kept secret. Then there won't be any chance to inflate. All the 
rating services should work hand in hand to insure this im- 
portant improvement in the validity of their reports, perhaps 
agreeing to rotate ratings weeks. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: The bigger network 
radio builds, tJie more important it is to publish 

m figures on spending by clients. If nets furnish 

this data (as they must), they'll be rewarded by 

^•1 more sales, as firms learn what rivals are doing. 



94 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Radio results: In Worcester, Mass., 
the thief who robbed "Doc" Chauvin's 
Boat House of four outboard motors 
and two power lawn mower motors ad- 
riiitted he first heard of "Doc's" estab- 
lishment on The John Woods Show 
over local station WTAG. Station's 
boast: ■•Kindly Old John" will either 
sell your merchandise or get rid of it 
somehow. 

Live longer: Merrill Langfitt, farm di- 
rector for KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa, 
lists in his "Monday Letter" the fol- 
lowing good health rules of Satchel 
Paige, veteran ballplayer. They might 
well be adopted by Madison Avenue: 

1. Avoid fried meats which angry 
uj) the blood. 

2. If your stomach disputes you, lie 
down and pacify it with cool thoughts. 

3. Keep your juices flowing by 
jangling around gently as you move. 

4. Go ver) light on the vices, such 
as carrying on in society; the social 
ramble ain't restful. 

5. Avoid running at all times. 

6. Don't never look back; some- 
thing may be gaining on you. 

Huh? The young secretary in a Madi- 
son Avenue office was breezing through 
sponsor-scope (11 May issue I, con- 
fused the second and third paragraphs. 
First paragraph mentioned SAG; sec- 
ond. Exquisite Form Brassiere, Inc. 
Puzzled, she asked her boss, "What 
kind of brassiere is a SAG?" 

Tough: AP reports that Warsaw. Po- 
land, banned a new beverage called 
Pola-Cola which was intended as com- 
munism's answer to American soft 
drinks. Well, there goes the chance for 
some great commercial copy such as 
"Have a Poke — it's refreshing." 

Contented cows: KGXO. Dodge City, 
Kan., has a farm program where Farm 
Director Roddv Peeples talks to the 
cows rather than to the farmers. 
MOOOOoooooo. 

On the line: Most inviting question- 
naire to come along in a while is from 
Claude Barrere. executive director of 
RTFS, to its members. It begins: 

1. Glad to belong. But all I can 
promise to do is: 

a. Pay my dues I Ma\ your breed 
increase I [ 

b. \ttend some big luncheons— 

c. \ltend some other luncheons [ 
(1. Buj a few Sweepstickets at 

Christmas [ 



SPONSOR 



18 may 1957 



what do YOU buy 




KV- ■ richest 

Grade B 

services. Your KATZ i 

with the con ,ry abou 1 

market and the LEADER in St I 

KWK-TV! 



KWK-TV has the best-knovw 

St Louis Television 1 Gil Newson 

Tom Dailey- offering top rat 

the local touch for YOUR c 

the top-rated film programs available I 

SPOT campaign on KWK Ch. 

you covered with this info! 



OPERATION ID offers oul 
availabilities on the LEADER in St Lou 
KWK-TV Fifteen ID's per week betw< 
and 5:00 p.m. for $41250' Five across the DOd- 
10:00 a.m. pull a CPM homes of FORTY CENTS 
Anytime is a good- time on daytime KWK Je\e\ 
Pick your times now. Check KATZ for availabil 
in the KWK OPERATION ID. 

By the way, the KWK-TV 5 & 10 PLAN off 
40% discount on daytime buys Check K„ 



KWK-TV 

has them all! 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 



the LEADER in St. Louis television 





CJ> 




Serving the 
Great St. Louis Market 

keep, covered 



IN ST. LOUIS 



Your Radio Spots on 







1 



KMBC-KFRM 

'& ^/5/ Vown the Pike 






The new 234-mile Kansas Turnpike — fast, 
easy route to Kansas City — brings thou- 
sands of new customers every day. They 
listen to the KMBC-KFRM Radio Team on 
the pike and in their homes. 



To Sell the entire Kansas City Trade Art 




Ever since the magnificent new $160,000,000 Kansas 
Turnpike opened, smart radio advertisers have been selling 
plus of new customers with KMBC-KFRM. These "pike" 
customers are not "pikers" ! They come to Kansas City wil 
pockets full of money to buy all sorts of things. 
They come from far down the pike in the rich 
trade area to the west and southwest. 

The ability of KMBC-KFRM to give you your pick of 
pike customers is no accident. A look at the map above 
will show you why. Note how the broad coverage of 
KMBC-KFRM matches the Kansas City Trade area. 

And KMBC-KFRM assure you of high listenership — 
with potent, personalized programming of Music, News, Spo 
Major League Baseball, Farm Service and Women's Progra 
It all adds up to your best radio buy in Missouri, with 
KMBC king-sized listenership in the Kansas City area; 
and KFRM (a bonus to KMBC advertisers) 
beaming your sales story to the State of Kansas. 

MORAL: Send your message down the 
Kansas Turnpike via KMBC-KFRM and step-up 
your sales in the Kansas City market. 

For choice availabilities, call your colonel from 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



I 



: V Kansas City 
KFRM fo* the State of Kansas 



Basic ABC Affiliate 



3 



in the Heart of America 



...ana in Television ■/■■dan *r\# 

the Swing is to 



DON DAVIS, 
President 

JOHN SCHILLING, 
Executive Vice-Presideri 
GEORGE HIGGINS, 
V.P. and Sales Managel 
DICK SMITH, 
Manager, KMBC-KFRM f» 
MORI GREINER, 
Manager, KMBC-TV 




[■»- 



Peters Gri 
Woodward 



• 



t\nl lAn.\ 




ft 







UMmaM 



25 MAY 1 • 6 
40« ■ copy • $10 ■ y«» 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



IN THE 
NATION'S CAPITAL, 



THIS IS 
THE ONE TO 
HCB BUILD ON ! 

NBC 
RC WRC-TV 




Wd of May, the city of Washington witnessed the laying of 
ttne for WRC-TV's new $4 million plant, the first building 
*' designed from the ground up for Color Television. It 
>CMes the most complete, up-to-date radio facilities. 
Wipolitan Washington and for the nation as a whole, the 
mtands as a promise of bright and colorful things to come. 



For advertisers to the Washington market, it represents a strong 

connecting link between a successful past and a more brilliant future. 

More than ever, you'll find that WRC-TV is the solid cornerstone for 



SHOULD YOU 
BUY BARTERED 
TV TIME? 



Clients .ii.- -pin ,,i 

controversj .i- n 
deals fin the marl 
Here are proa and • 
oj bartered time d< 

Page 33 



Walter Lowen 
on radio-tv 
manpower 

Page 36 

Has Pulse 
found an all- 
media yardstick? 

Page 39 

RADIO BASICS: 
buys, audience, 
trends, set data 

Page 47 



your advertising plans in Washington 

soid by (nm) spot sales .vashington. d. 



WRC-TV 4 




One Stands Out In 
Des Moines, Iowa 

...and for more reasons than the spectacular 
LIGHTED TOWER 




RATINGS 

AGAIN & 
AGAIN!! 



NEW A. R B. REPORT SHOWS 



19 



KRNT-TV WITH 



OUT OF TOP 



20 



315 FIRSTS OUT OF 474 
QUARTER - HOURS. NEWS 
RATINGS UP TO 46 6 



HUNT* TV 



KATZ HAS THE FACTS ON 
THIS COWLES OPERATION 



SPONSOR • 2.1 MAY 1957 



25 May 1957 • Vol. 11, \o. 21 

S PO N S» O R 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Should you buy bartered time? 
33 Clients an- split on this controvers) as more deals glut the market. 
Here are the pin- and cons of barter with the possible repercussions 

Walter Lowen on ad manpower 

36 \" expert in advertising personnel placement views the current Madison 
Vvenue scene, finds salaries at a plateau, unemployment at a minimum 

Found: an all-media yardstick 

39 Pulse develop- what it terms advertising's first equitable measurement 
of all media: determines comparable cost-per-1,000, ad memorability 

Humor proves the perfect sleeper 

42 Serta Mattress Co. of Pittsburgh u-ing zany commercials anil feature 
film, went from 1-Jth to fifth place among 44 Serta assembly plants 

Spot's first quarter 

43 TvB dollar data for first quarter reveals spending hit record high of 
$117 million. Meanwhile spot radio really zoomed, spending up 40.5% 

Radio Basics/May 

47 Debut of a regular monthly section which will highlight key facts 
about radio — of interest to both spot radio and network advertisers 



FEATURES 

18 \gency Ad Libs 
28 19th and Madison 
60 Mr. Sponsor 
55 New and Renew 
68 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 Newsmaker of the Week 
88 Reps at Work 
52 Sponsor Asks 



84 Sponsor Hears 
9 Sponsor-Scope 
92 Sponsor Speaks 
64 Spot Buys 
92 Ten Second Spots 
16 Timebuyers at Work 
90 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
3 1 Washington Week 
24 Women's Week 



^ 



In Upcoming Issues 

Who will make radio's first big nighttime buy? 

\n analysis of tin- factor- which make a big nighttime' radio break- 
gh inevitable, including costs, audience reach 

Preview of network tv programing 

p in \t issue, tin fall nighttime network t\ schedule with 
i. mi cost estimates, cost comparisons with the seasons past 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP— Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 

Advertising Staff 

Jane E. Perry 

George Becker 

Ginger Dixon 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 

Administrative Staff 

M. Therese McHugh 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
<49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
161 E. Grand Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
HOIIywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign $11. Sin- 
gle copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



LARGEST 



OF ANY STATION IN IOWA 



According to Nielsen 

TV Leads in ALLCate 

Reached Monthly, Nu 

Weekly and Daily 

Weekly and Daily 






AUDIENCE 



OR ILLINOIS (outside Chicago) 



overage Service, WOC- 
bries: Number of Homes 

nber Reached Weekly . . . 
Daytime Circulation; 

Nighttime Circul 



dation. 



WOC-TV COVERAGE DATA - 



Population 

Families 

Retail Sales 

Effective buying Income 

Source 

Number TV Homes 
Source 



1,568,500 

484,800 

11,926,588,000 

$2,582,388,000 

1956 Surve) of Buying Income 

(Saks Management) 

U 7,902 

Ad\ crtiMnj; Research 

Foundation 




WOC-TV- Davenport, Iowa is part of Central Broadcasting Company which also owns and 



The Quint-Cities Station 
— Da\enport and Betten- 
dorf in Iowa: Rock Is- 
land. Moline and East 
Molinc in Illinois. 



operates WHO-TV and WHO- Radio«Des Moines 

Mil* if 



( ..I M I Palmer, 

President 

• < Sanders, 

Res. Mtr 
Mark Wodlinger, 

Ko Sales Manager 
PI I I K\ GRII I IN. 
WOODWARD. INC 
EXCLUSIVE 
N \ l IONAL 
REPRESENTATIVE 


















f 




WBRE-TV Means 



PERFECT PICTURE COMMUNICATION 

to the people of 19 Counties in N.E. Pennsylvania 




An apple or a lovely lady individually make a pretty picture . . . 
together they communicate a message . . . and that message is 
natural picture perfection which your clients products or services get 
on WBRE-TV ... in full-color or black and white. And with 
2,000,000 potential customers to see your message WBRE-TV is 
the "one" station in Northeastern Pennsylvania that guarantees 
coverage and eye appeal. 



AN Jfcgg BASIC BUY : National Representative : The Headley-Reed Co. 

Counties Covered: LUZERNE LACKAWANNA LYCOMING COLUMBIA 

SCHULYKILL NORTHUMBERLAND MONROE PIKE WAYNE 

WYOMING SULLIVAN SUSQUEHANNA BRADFORD UNION 

LEHIGH SNYDER MONTOUR CARBON CLINTON 



An interesting method ol communication was used in 1690 by 
Amatons a French physician who conceived the idea of sig- 
nalling with Hags and crossbars on poles and reading these 
signs with the telescope. Unfortunately. Amatons did not have 
the courage to push his theory and others profited by the 
system he originated. Cumbersome adaptations of Amatons' 
signal posts were used in this country during the Revolutionary 
War. A barrel, a flag and a basket mounted on a pole were 
used to convey a variety of messages by changing the position 
of the articles. 



TV Channel 28 

WILKES-BARRE. PA. 



he week 



The news: Iftei toft-pedaling ii /<" two seasons, Pontiat 

ii ill \liij> down ii cool S") million 01 >» on video l<> juisli i/\ 1958 

model. Television will pln\ u ke) iolr in n crucial drive /" recast 
Poniiac'i brand image foi n greatet appeal i<> younget tmerica and 
to fight of) the encroachments "' both high- <mil low-price autos. 

The newsmaker: Ernest K. Jones, 13-year-old president ol 
MacManus, Jolm \ \dam-. Pontiac's anenc\ of lon» standing, cre- 
ated a stir about a year and a half ago with his statement that i\ is 
not a prime medium for moving hard goods. Tin- reaction rathei 
surprised him particular l\ the trade press headlines, which tagged 
dim with an anti-u label. This i- not true at all. Bays Jones, and 
points to Pontiac's new plan- lor t\. which include nearlj S3 million 
for half a dozen specials and the pro-football playoffs on the net- 
work. \nr. June- maintain-, due- tin- represent a change in lii- 
thinking. He'll still stand \<\ his 
statement but wishes that people 
rememher that the ke\ word in it 
i- "prime." \lter all. he add-. t\ 
will -till account for no more than 
of I'ontiae's ad budget dur- 
ing the coining season. 

Whatever the percentage, t\. I>\ 
Jones" own admission, will he em- 
ployed as a spearhead in a cam- 
paign of great importance to Pon- 
tiac: To turn that car from a 
family-type auto with an aura of 
dependability into a brighter, 
more youthful version. This face-lifting drive requires both impact 
and speed — tv. Jones feels, fits the hill on both counts. "It can 
change a brand personality faster than anv other medium." 

This marketing strategy is not just an excuse to give copywriters 
a zippy theme. Pontiac shares with other medium-price cars a 
squeeze from both lower-price car- i whose fancy models are actuall) 
in the medium-price category I and luxury makes (which owner- oi 
low-price cars often leap to when taking a step up the social ladder'. 

Jones will be constantly in touch with the marketing steps which 
attempt to solve this dilemma. Though as president, he work- on all 
accounts. Jones is especial!] close to Pontiac and was running the 
account just before being made president in December L955. \- a 
matter of fact, he started his career with Pontiac when he came to 
work at MJ& \ 1 ( ) \ears ago as a "dog robber" (meaning one who 
works in a lowly capacity I. He worked under the then MJ^ \ presi- 
dent \Y. A. P. "Wap" John, but also learned plenty about the auto 
business from the late James \dams and Theodore MacManus, both 
of whom had more than a little to do with Cadillac, also a 
MacManus, John & Adams account. ^ 




Ernest ./. Jones 



SPONSOR 



2i M\v L957 



PRIMARY 
MARKET 



400,000 people in the 
Ann Arbor area respond 
primarily to local radio. 
It's a huge market AND 
NOT ADEQUATELY 
COVERED BY OUTSIDE 
STATIONS. 





AREA 

Includes Plymouth, 
Ypsilanti, Livonia and 
23 important industrial 
communities in Michigan. 



FIRSTinPULSE 

Most recent Pulse 
indicates WHRV's strong 
superiority... 18 firsts 
(half hours) out of 24. 




1,000 watts abc 1600 kc 

Major league baseball, 
University of Mich, sports 
Detroit Red Wing Hockey 

6:00-9:00 A.M. Joe and Ralph, 
famous in Mich, area 



I 



Write for special merchandising 
plan or contact: 

BOB DORE ASSOCIATES 
National Representatives 

the door ■'« altcay* optn . . . 

* urn. m w« 










1 



A. J. McCULLOUGH, Advertising Manager ^ JIM EHAROSHE, Salesman -Route 9 |J ED BEHMKE, Salesman- Route 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



'A very strong sales increase has 
been t't'lt on the b1 rength of the 
w\i\ show, it has made people 
aware of our brand name." 





From all quarters, reports keep coming in 
on the sales effectiveness of wxix. Milwaukee. 
Like these, for example, from the advertising 
manager and salesmen of Cudahy Brothers 
Co., Wisconsin meat packers. Butcher, baker, 
candlestick maker... they all like the hefty 
results they get with low-cost, top-grade... 



>u NED • CHANNEL 19 IN MILWAUKEE 
REPRESENTED BY I Its TELEVISION 



WXIX 



DICK MUELLER, Salesman -Route 10 I H. J. MARTIND ALE, Salesman -Route ] 1 JOHN' HUTT, Salesman- City 



sponsor • 25 Am 1951 




This one television station 

delivers four standard 

metropolitan area markets plus 



• 917,320 TV sets 

• 1,015,655 families 

• 3V2 million people 

• $3% billion retail sales 

• $6% billion annual income 

WGALTV 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 
NBC and CBS 

STEINMAN STATION . Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Representative: 

he MEEKER Com 

>w York 
Angeles 



Chicago 
San Francisco 




SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



iiott significant tv and railm 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for l>usy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



25 MAY 

Cfvyrliht l»57 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Now that tv is pretty well on the rails for this fall, radio i« moving forw ar d an tin- 
No. 1 attention-getter. 

This week von could sense the excitement continuing to kindle around whs] 
had been considered a humdrum — if not ramshackle medium. 

Keener and more sensitive reps even were beginning to e\oI\c ■ kind of "moti- 
vations" philosophy about radio and its comeback. Here i^ what the) told SPONSOR- 
SCOPE: 

Tn pinpointing a pitch to an advertising prospect, try to address yourself to ■ 
member of the older generation. He'll be your besl booster, because: 

• lie came lip in the heyday of radio, and likes to be identified with it- glamour and 
successes. 

• He has an appreciation of what the medium ean do. 

Somewhat curiouslv. though, the younger Fellows heretofore prone to pooh-pooh radio 
is a buggv-whip curiosity are beginning to soften up. That may be due to: 

• Ford's spectacular $5.5 million (gross) network buy. 

• Radio's insistence that it has never lost hold on the public that it "s economical, and 
that it "stays modern." 



Finding attentive ears for radio's story may not be so hard as you mJghl guess 
offhand. That's what Walter Lowen, retired personnel expert, implies in a talk with 
SPONSOR (see page 36K 

Lowen ridicules the much-quoted wheeze that advertising is a young man'« game. S 
he : The average age of men in key spots is 55. 

(Incidentally. Lowen also thinks that the clover on Madison Avenue is ahout as high 
as it will get for a while — there's no acute manpower shortage, so salaries are topping 
off.) 



Henry Schachte. Lever Bros, ad v.p., is a firm disciple of the cult that says. 

"When in radio use lots of it." 

His comment after listening this week to a radio network pitch : 
"We've never had a failure where we used frequency." 



A partner in a major rep firm has accompanied his salesmen on their agency 
rounds for two weeks to find out what services media people want most these d 
His findings, as digested in an office memo this week: 

1) A clean and clear availability sheet showing rates, programing, and rating. 

2) A program sheet showing the availability of locally produced shows, with names 
of personalities, description, etc. 

3) A digest of the station's rate card attached to all forms of information. 
Somewhat surprisinglv. few buyers wan' data abou' the station's market. Thev 

figure most such material is dated: moreover, the agency's own research or marketing de- 
partment has information of this type on file. 



A film theatre operator in Lincoln, Neb., once more validates the old adage 
that if you can't lick 'em. join 'em. 

The local Varsity Theatre is buying spots on KOI.VTY- late movie show b> sell the 
house's current attraction. Box office results after three weeks : excellent. 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 



You can work yourself into a fine state of schizophrenia over the air media 
these days. Are the networks causing the spot people undue headaches? Who's doing what 
t<> whom? 

This week the cold, mathematical facts emerged: 

• CBS and NBC radio continued pointing to the higgest first quarter in several 
years. 

• Meantime SRA reports a 40.5% zoom in gross spot sales — $48,829,000 for the first 
quarter this year vs. $34,750,000 for 1956. 

• And TvB boasted of a $116,935,000 initial three months vs. $100,209,000 the 
year before. 

(For details, plus ;i breakdown of tv spot, sponsor expenditures for 1957's first quarter, 
see page 43.) 

Madison Avenue agencies this week described Bob Eastman, ABC Radio Net- 
work president, as behaving like a man with a well crystalized plan of action. 

Among the things he's been telling them: 

• ABC Radio means to establish a realistic, happy relationship with affiliates, mak- 
ing sure that everybody gets a gratifying piece of the pie. 

• ABC Radio will practice strict adherence to the rate card. 

• All network programing will be pretested (live), evaluated in light of local pro- 
graming needs, and checked for advertiser-agency impression before it goes on the air. 

• ABC Radio conceives of its shows in terms of actual sales results — not just ratings. 

A toprung Madison Avenue agency this week declined to accept a radio net- 
work's unsolicited "bonus" on a three-months' buy. 

The network was told: "Please bill us according to the ratecard. We want to avoid 
the embarrassment of finding out later that one of our client's other agencies got 
an even better 'bonus' than ours." 

Problem: Catch a special audience; Catch it away from home; and catch it in the 
act of consuming your product. Here's this week's answer: 

The buy is a late Friday evening quarter hour on WRCA. New York, by Schaefer beer 
through BBDO for a minimum of 13 weeks. 

The target is boatsmen — whose weekend stores usually include both a portable radio 
and a case of beer. 

Program content: Weather and tide reports, and taped interviews with air person- 
alities who likewise are weekend boatsmen. 

Within six weeks, CBS Radio's nighttime and weekend sales plan, Impact, has 
quadrupled its sponsored segments. 

The scoreboard: On 15 March (when the plan w f ent into effect) 11 segments; 13-week 
orders as of 1 June total 44 segments. 

Matching NBC Radio's $200,000 order from Pabst, CBS Radio this week picked up a 
weekly quarter-hour for Godfrev from American Home, effective 3 July. 

This experience by a major agency may not be entirely typical, but it indicates that 
few radio stations have their heart and soul in NCS#2. 

The account involved in this instance is budgeted at around $2 million, with distribu- 
tion in New England. New York. Pennsvlvania, and Maryland. 

The client wanted to switch from newspapers to spot radio on a 52-week basis. 

So the agencv asked reps for coverage information based on NCS#2. 

Unanimous reply from reps: Sorry, we don't have it. 

Now the agency is solving the problem by (1) taking the interference-free con- 
tours of those stations within the product's marketing area and analyzing the 
Pulse on all counties involved: (2) selecting its list by estimating which stations pro- 
duce the largest audience in a given area at a given time. 

10 SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 






, 



SPONSOR-SCOPE contamti 



Ml< -IN len'l patting much heat on sponsors to telecMl their ihowi in <<>l<u 

Whether a facilities rate rani for color will be baaed i-> wtill nndetermined. \t 
present, the onlj extra charge is for use "f the color studio. 

NBC TV- earlier efforts in impose a color quota foi lilm- controlled I' iIh- network 
drew protests from agencies. (The additional e<>»t for color in .1 half-hoar film -li"\\ i- ^i'.. 1 " 



Trends have a »nv of sneaking op in tvi Thus the trade sudden!; has discov- 
ered thai next fall there will be almost as manj shows headed up bj vocalists as 

westerns. 

SPONSOR-SCOPK's recheck this week of paid programs set for fall indicates I I west* 
eniS ami 10 programs fronted by singers. 

The vocalist roster: Perry Como, Edrlie Fislicr. Dinah Shore, Patrice Munsel, Gisele 

Mac -Ken/ie. I'atti Page. Pat Boone, Guy Mitchell, Frank Sinatra. Ernie Ford. 



In terms of actual hours, it doesn't look an though film will clobber live pro- 
graming too badly in the sponsored lineups of the three network- next Tail. 

This week's count shows 20 1 /. hours of film and 26 hour- of live programing. I he 
ratio: 51 film to 46 live. 

Last fall the ratio in hours was S3 live vs. 47 film. 



A sign that prospects for network tv program sales are thinning out: One of 

the leading Hollywood producers offered his show on a guaranteed-eireulation basis. 

The Madison Avenue agency approached by the producer told SPONSOR-SCOPE tin- 
only reason it turned down the deal was that it couldn't use that particular property. 



Sliderule prophets have dreamed up still another method for determining 
which of two available shows is the right choice for a particular product. 

As explained to SPONSOR-SCOPE this week, the formula work< this way: 

Say the product is bought mainly by people under 50. 

Program A gets a 30 rating, but 50T of the audience is over 50. Reduced to actual 
"sales ■weight." that rating becomes a "potential market" of 15. 

Program B has a 20 rating, but 80^ of of the viewers arc in age groups under 50. 
Applving the "sales weight" principle, vour "potential market" rating hecome- 16. 

That's slicing it prettv thin — but as one aaency tv executive put it. "Fife would be too 
simple for the creative judgment were it not for the mathematician. 



For sponsors curious about where their money goes when they buy an expensive live 
sh»w. here's the cost breakdown for a typical musical hour priced at 8100.000: 

Permanent star ($6,000) and guest stars 

Choreography _ 3,000 

Producing staff . H ^0 

Writers and royalties l.i>00 

Orchestra, chorus, arrangements • ' ' 

Studio production, cameras, wardrohe. etc. L8, 

Talent agency controlling the star 

AFTRA, social security, taxes -•' 

Contingencies l.iOO 

Network's share for creation, supervision, etc. . .000 

Client agency's commission l.-t.OOO 

TOTAL $100,000 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



11 



t: 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The tricky, animated lead-in for commercials seems to have lost much of its 
bloom among advertisers. 

In fact, a counter-trend toward more and more live-action film definitely is in 
sight. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE this week asked the 10 leading agencies about their use of live-action 
vs. animated commercials in recent months, and the ratios averaged out to: 

Live-action, 80%; animated commercials, 20%. 

Moreover, the same check also indicates that commercial production is becoming well 
stabilized, for cost estimates from producers now are amazingly close. One agency Teported 
that recently in a bid for a $4,000 project three producers were only $10 to $20 apart. 

The drop in the ratio of animated cartoons seems to indicate that cycles in commer- 
cial popularity change with about the same rapidity as cycles in entertainment 
programing. 

The sad fortunes of animation— one agency commercial director told SPONSOR-SCOPE 
— might be traced to a combination of ultra-stylism and imitation. 

He put it this way: 

UPA's high-style technique exploded a trend. Then some UPA employees went off on 
their own and developed variations and abstractions of the UPA style. Eventually that can- 
celed out the novelty and brought about a "phoney" tinge. 

Bristol-Myers is cutting back its local feature film commitments end of next 
month, dropping Philadelphia (but retaining New Orleans and Fort Worth). 

B-M ad manager Don Frost's commentary to SPONSOR-SCOPE on the firm's sponsor- 
ship of feature films: 

"These campaigns have worked out very well for us. The ratings and results have 
been good. Our withdrawal from Philadelphia is just a case of wanting to make a 
change in markets where the pressure at the moment is not so great." 

Frost added that plans for using feature films in other markets weren't firm right now. 

J. B. Williams soon may be readying a campaign for its new version of Aqua- 
Velva. The story behind this change could become a legend similar to the one about the 
advice to Coca-Cola: "Bottle it!" 

What happened at Williams was this: Somebody suggested changing the color of 
the after-shave lotion from amber to blue — because blue is associated with coolness. 

A field test was made in which "guinea pigs" were asked to apply the amber-colored 
liquid to one cheek and the blue version to the other. Almost unanimously the blue lotion 
was voted more cooling than the warm-hued one. 

What is the immediate ambition of a timebuyer? 

SPONSOR-SCOPE did a random check among 20 this week and found their dreamstuff 
was to: 

Get out of the details of timebuying as qxiickly as possible and become a mem- 
ber of a product group. 

This also has its rueful side: Before a timebuyer can move up, he or she has the tedious 
task of breaking in a successor. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5; New 
and Renew, page 55; Spot Buys, page 64; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 68; Washington 
Week, page 81; SPONSOR Hears, page 84; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 90. 

12 sponsor • 25 may 1957 






I 






NETWORK 
QUALITY 

at the local level! 



WIDE, WIDE TEXAS 



The show — Wide, Wide World, the engineering and production 
facility — KPRC-TV, the assignment — live camera covei 
the 70-mile Houston ship channel from sea, air and land in a 
20-minute period. A 48-nian KPRC-TV staff with supplemen- 
tary personnel and equipment delivered coverage for the network, 
using nine cameras located on a shrimp boat, helicopter, battle- 
ship, moving truck and atop a grain elevator. The art of knowing 
how in Houston belongs to KPRC-TV . . . the most potent 
advertising force in the Houston market! 




KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON 

CHANNEL 2 



JACK HARRIS 
Vice President and General Manager 



JACK McGREW 



EDWARD PETRY A CO 



KPRC-TV 



■ 



FIRST INEXPERIENCE WITH OVER 900 MAN-YEARS 





The April National ARB, just out, shows: In daytime entertainmenl programs, N 
Television now leads the second network in 15 out of 18 competitive quarter-hours. 
In just one year, NBC Television's daytime entertainiiK 'nt audience ha- increased 1 8%. 
This is the greatest one-year growth-story 
in the entire history of television. 






NBC TELEVISION 



CASE HISTORY 
-HOTELS ^fc^A §!£ 



\A 




Disneyland Hotel, adjoining world-famed 
Disneyland Park, had two problems at the 
start of 1957: 

1. Guests had registered from 10 stale- and 
foreign lands, but not enough of them were 
from Southern California. 

2. Superb convention faeilities weren't being 
used sufficiently by clubs and businesses. 

Edward L. Koblitz, President of The Ed- 
wards Agency Inc., Los Angeles, aimed 
squarely at both targets with a human-in- 
terest radio news commentary late each after- 
noon on KBIG. 

"We Sought the Medium which would give 
greatest coverage at most reasonable cost" 
write- Koblitz. "We wanted to beam heavy 
into Los Angeles and Orange Counties and 
along the Coast from San Diego to Santa 
Barbara. Happily, Sidelights in the News, 
expertly created by your program director 
Alan Lisser, has proved the magic answer 
in attracting local clientele to this fine resort 
hotel . 

"To Sell Our Meeting Faeilities, we 

stressed 'Make Your Convention a Family 
Affair', devoting entire commercials to busi- 
nesses who became our customers. 

"Our Guest List today shows a record num- 
ber of names from local communities, and 
business usage has hit an all-time high •. . . 
proof indeed that KBIG really registers 
throughout all ihe Southland." 

Ask your Weed man for other case histories 
aplenty to help you evaluate Southern Cali- 
fornia radio. 






KBIG 

The Coialma Station 
10.000 Watts 

740 "\£T 



JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6S40 Sunset Blvd.. Los Angeles 28, California 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-320S 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



It. 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Edna S. Cathcart, J. \I. Mathes Inc., New York, timebuyer 
for Canada Dry, thinks there's no room for complacency in time- 
buying. "My 14 years as buyer for radio and television on all our 
accounts,'' Edna says, "have given me much experience for which 
I'm grateful. But I find that each day is a da) for learning. Ours is 
an ever-changing business." She 
points to the man) trends which 
affect timebu) ing. "New station 
management or program format 
can change listening habits in a 
few short months. Radio networks 
are still developing new patterns. 
And television's continued rapid 
growth means day-to-day changes. 
There are shifts in the public's 
buying habits. Industries build and 
expand giving new importance. 
Research grows and develops. 
There are new clients with new problems and old clients with new- 
problems." The one thing that remains constant, she says, is the '"re- 
sponsibility of spending the clients dollar wisely and profitably. This 
means careful study of every phase of media in relation to the client's 
product." Edna concludes, "A whisper that sales are up is enough 
to keep me happily rolling up my sleeves to tackle each new day. 



Elaine Whalen, Emil Mogul Co., New York, timebuyer for Revlon, 
comments: "1 have seen a great deal of trade material written about 
improving salesman-Luyer relations, but what is too often neglected 
is buyers and salesman's area of responsibility, respectively. Too 
many buyers expect the salesman to carry the burden for the buvet 9 

individual accounts and that often- 
times makes for hard feelings 
between them. I'm amazed when 
buvers complain that a salesman 
is poor because he 'never improves 
my spots.' To me. it's the buyer's 
job to watch his clients spots and 
initiate improvements and changes 
where necessary. Carried to it s 
logical extreme, one can assume 
that if this were the salesman's 
responsibility, it would then follow 
that he should notify the buyer 
that his station has dropped from second to fourth place in the 
latest rating and that the buver should consider cancelling. How 
long could such a helpful salesman hold his job? \a hat it l>nil~ 
down to is that the buyer must avoid the path of least resistance 
and assume complete responsibility - keeping up with trends, 
adopting a flexible buying attitude and upgrading schedule-. 




SPONSOR 



23 may 1957 



WEAU-TV 




Eclu Claire 






in Wisconsin 

With the advent of our new 
1000 foot, maximum power 
tower, WEAU-TV comes into 
its own . . . delivering you a 
market of more than a 
quarter-million TV families. 



DULUTH- SUPERIOR 
Ol SPOON ER 



WAUSAU 



>L1/? ST. PAUL 

),\W< EAU 

x J$) ~ CLAIRE 

v ^MXrochester 

\ 



... L \ 






GREEN BAV 








JtwL LA CROSSE 



YOUR BONUS 

COVERAGE: Twice the area 
previously covered. 

MARKET: 100,000 more viewing, 
buying families 

IMPACT: WEAU-TV's is a single- 
station market assuring 
you of saturation coverage. 



sponsor • 2S MAY 195 , 



i: 






IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEART 
OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST 




Wenatchee, Wash. 

SERVES 20,000 
RADIO FARM HOMES 



KPQ covers this diversified farm area 
from every angle, with the most com- 
plete farm news available. In fact, KPQ 
is the only radio station in Central 
Washington with a full-time farm news 
editor. 



MEET OUR 

FARM NEWS 

EDITOR 




JACK JETT 

A native of Wenotchee, with a back- 
ground of orchard, wheat, and cattle, 
ranch work; U of Wash. School of 
Journalism; formerly full-time ag edi- 
tor for Wenatchee World; has con- 
tributed farm articles to AP, UP, 
INS, Spokesman-Review, Seattle PI, 
Seattle Times, and well-known farm 
publications; member. Wash. State 
Horticultural Assn., Cattlemen's Assn., 
Crop Improvement Assn., Wheat 
Growers Assn., Nat'l Assn. Radio & 
TV Farm Directors, American News- 
paper Editors & Reporters Guild. 

TWO FARM SHOWS DAILY: 

5:25 AM to 7 AM 
12:30 PM to 1 PM 



by Bob Foreman 




5000 WATTS 

560 KC 
(ABC-NBC Affiliate) 

National Reps: 

FORJOE & CO., INC. 

Seattle & Portland Reps: 

ART MOORE & ASSOCIATES 

Wenatchee, Wash. 
Apple Capital of the World 



Agency ad libs 




The importance of being different 

'I here haw heen some pitln comments made 
of late on the subject of advertising eop\ which 
would be well worth the study of practitioners of 
the business. Although these remarks pertain to 
all media, there was much of substance for those 
who major in television commercials in the 
statements made by Whit Hobbs (BBDO) and 
Roy Whittier (ex-Y&R) at the recent 4A's 
session. These talks are available or will be soon and rather than 
crib from them here, I shall devote my words today to a set of dicta 
not available but equally substantial and on the same subject. 

The gentleman who made the remarks is, I daresay, one of the 
leading exponents of Personality-in-Advertising and has scores of 
exhibits, in all media, to demonstrate that he does not set up criteria 
for others that his company cannot meet in its own advertising. His 
name is Martin Revson and almost any day of the week you can 
see examples of what he means on your tv tube or in the class 
magazines when he states that advertising must have a Personality - 
Which-Sets-It-Apart, not merely from competitors' efforts but from 
those of all advertisers. Call it That-Ofl-Beat-Look, a Distinction, 
a Character-All-Its-Own. 

The commercial must say "Me, me, me!" 

You have only to look at Revlon advertising in print or broadcast 
to see a good example of this. The "Revlon look"' is perhaps as readily 
discernible an Advertising Personality as any in the entire business. 
It is achieved neither by luck nor in haste but by dint of the hardest 
kind of work in several agencies supervised every pica and foot 
of the way by George Abrams. Bill Mandel and the other Revlon ad- 
folks. Only complete devotion to this principle of Personality Adver- 
tising and constant dissatisfaction with anything that is short of a 
great ad makes it possible. 

There are those who might read into my comments that it would 
be a miserable lot to work for an advertiser who insists on Greatness- 
per-ad and approves only what adheres to so personal a premise as 
Personality. Let me dispel this idea at once. True if you (copy 
writer, account man or product manager I are yourself content w ith 
the less-than-great, your life on such an account would be frightening. 
But if the business of developing outstanding advertising stimulates 
you ... if you find the search for and creation of exciting cop\ 
and concepts a pleasure ... if you enjoy expending the effort neces- 
sary to the making of ads that are not only lovely things to look at but 
which at the same time, work and work fast I next day. for instance) 
. . . well, M.R. and George are in your camp. This camp, however, 
does not welcome the Eagle Scout, the dilettante, nor the 9 to 5 
operator. 

I've always been somewhat reluctant to effuse, as above, about 
advertisers with whom I work since I'm afeered of being tagged an 



i;; 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



KRON isTVfaSF 




S&^7-^zasi£jcc& ccotcs aA£- so&d o-t<c /(gO/V-T^ 




S. F. CHRONICLE • NBC AFFILIATE . CHANNEL 4 • PETERS. GRI FFI N . WOODWARD 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 195' 



19 









Af 




"coverage" 

KVOO-TV blankets north- 
eastern Oklahoma with the 
tops in network and local pro- 
gramming. This coverage is 
backed up by revealing market 
research, merchandising and 
promotion aids, and constant 
attention to your account and 
problems. 



"wampum" 

KVOO-TV blankets a Si- 
billion market. Out of the top 
90 key industrial markets, 
Tulsa has the fastest dollar 
value growth of any city in 
the nation.* If you have some- 
thing to sell, you can sell more 
of it in northeastern Okla- 
homa . . . over KVOO-TV. 



•U. S. Census of Mfg., U. S. Dept. of 
Commerce 



NOW A 



A wide selection of good spots in popu- 
lar participating shows. I.D.'s, 20 sec, 
and 1 minute spots in all classes. Check 
up to the minute availabilities with 
your nearest BLAIR-TV man. 



KVi 

channel 



For current availabilities , — J 
contact any office of BLAIR TV 



fice of BLAIR -t\ 



20 



Agency ad libs continued 



apple-polisher. Furthermore, I hate fruit. In this case though, 1 II 
run the risk since the points Martin makes seem to me to be so valid, 
so pertinent and so important — yet so seldom recognized 1>\ the folks 
who are doing our commercials and our print ads these da\s. 

'"Take Marlboro cigarettes," said Martin. "They've got it. They've 
built a personality for themselves and with all cigarette copy look- 
ing so much alike — and so little that can he said about any brand, 
it's all the more \ ital to find a way, a technique to set yourself off 
from the mob. Ever) commercial, every ad must say — 'Me, me, me!' 
and clearly show that it does. 

You can tell a Breck ad at 50 paces 

"Take Breck," he went on. "They've got it. You can tell a Breck 
ad at 50 paces. It reeks of class and distinction and its own special 
character. No wonder people buy the product! 

"If you can't develop an Advertising Personality for your product, 
you ought to fold up shop and quit. You just haven't got a chance 
these days. Even the weight of dollars won't take the place of 
advertising different-ness." 

All of which is just a fraction of what he said and is expressed 
in words far less colorful than he used. But you get the drift. 

Thumb through your magazines or pay close attention to a full 
night's fare of tv commercials and note how much of it echoes what 
you just saw for another product, how it says the same thing in the 
same manner. Note too how little you recall at the end of the evening 
because so little of it had the distinction to be recalled. Then sit back 
and think of how to create this Personality. 

As Martin puts it. "All the agency research charts and all the 
marketing experts in the world wont solve the problem. It takes a 
guy or a gal with a pencil and an inspiration." ^ 




The "Revlon look" is perhaps as readily discernible an advertising person- 
ality as any in the business. It is achieved by the hardest kind of ^<>rk 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



9i$ tea$ue signal! 



Who's or\ first in Cleveland radio? 

From 6 AM to midnight 
PULSE shows that 
all stations trail WERE 
87.5% of the time. 

WERE leads in 63 of the 
total 72 quarter hours, and is 
on second for the other nine. 
Nothing less. 

Know a better place to 
make u,our pitch than on 




Cleveland's Sound 
Listening/Selling Habit 



RICHARP M. KLAUS 

\. ice President 6 

Qeneral Manager 



Represented Nationally bu, Venard. Rintoul & McConnell. Inc. 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



21 



Newsfilm tells the world, 





A'< W8film is global not onlj 

• '• ■■■ of news, l.nt also ii 
distribution. There are subscriber 
• around theworld. In I. 
Denmark, Holland and Lux- 
[n Au tralia and Japan, 
h Hawaii and Alaska. In Canada, 
Cuba, Mexico and Argentina. 

for 
Ni vsfilm's worldwide growth. [1 
newscoverj a |, 

complete. [1 a produi I BS 
News, known the world ovi 
broad© ti th- 

eringorganizati( I third, 

Newsfilm is the only 
service produa ecially 
and exclusively :■ 
use of television statii 

I >ne major subscriber 

to this service is [ndi - 
pendent Television 
News Limited, the 

network newsservice 

for Great Britaii 
commercial television 
system. According to 
Editor Geoffrey Cox of 
itn: "Nt wsfilm lias been 
of immense valui 
We have been able to rely on 
it with complete lidence 
as the foundation of our foreign 
cov. ..not only in the Unr 

but throughout the r 
theworld. Particularly. A 

orting of major ha: p< 
has been outstandii [ 

Awordtotheworldl; 
film is available to all stt 

home and abr 
information from . . . 

CBS TELEVISION 
FILM SALES, INC. 

"... the best film . * t'.,r nil stations" 




BALTIMORE 



when 
you 
ride with 



. 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 I ] 



--.! 



REPRESENTED BY 



JOHN BLAIR AND CO. 



'i 



ISews and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



Adwomen are defensive, according to ad employment expert 
Walter Lowen. He's the father of Ruth Lowen, who took over his 
job counseling business early this month las reported in Women's 
Week 18 May; see also the story on Walter Lowen. page 36. 

Why are women defensive'.'' Because, says Lowen, they tr\ too 
hard in their advertising jobs. A man, once having achieved recog- 
nition, will ride with his success. A woman keeps trying to prove 
herself. She's tense, not relaxed, insecure. She's eternalK reaffirm- 
ing to herself and to the world that she's a pro. 

The biggest single factor in making women professionals in adver- 
tising, says Lowen, was the emergency of the lady timebuyer. This 
move was the first crack in the wall between clerical and executive. 



Are you an eye-blinker? Well, every woman is. But the frequency 
with which you blink your eyes, especiallv when \ ou're in a product- 
stocked super market, is one of the over-the-cocktail and or dinner 
table topics destined for any current entertaining in vour menage. 
Even if you, your husband or your current amour aren't in adver- 
tising, your guests will be chatting at a gossipy clip about Vance 
Packard's Hidden Persuaders. His report I McKay. $4 I on "symbol 
manipulation'' in motivational research comes up with ideas both 
new and old — but always in a new- package. Over the next Bloody 
Mary, Coke or gin and tonic y ou 11 find yourself immersed in Pack- 
ard's answers to such provocative queries as "Why has the DeSoto 
been very popular with middle-aged ladies?" (The answer is dis- 
appointinglv un-Freudian : A DeSoto symbolizes conservatism and 
responsibility, with a dash of money and pride. ) 



Women are devious — but another word is subtle. If they don't 
get what thev want directlv. they'll do it indirectly — both in business 
and in private. 

Bea Johnson, who broadcasts a variety of women's shows from 
KMBC and KMBC-TV. Kansas City, is attractive and chic— and 
smart. She found herself in the happy position of selling cars, house- 
hold furnishings and sundry other products to women in her tv 
audience — but only one food product, the most logical type of 
account for her to carry. 

She called in the stations salesmen and invited them to dinner one 
month from that meeting day. The gimmick : she'd serve them the 
food made by her sponsors and alack-a-day. at this point she had 
only one — a tapioca account. Because she's a good cook she 
could, indeed, figure some way to prepare an eight-course meal from 
tapioca. But she suggested thev might prefer something more sturdy. 

The salesmen rustled — and brought in 12 participating food 
advertisers before the dinner deadline. The meal included soup, 
salad, relishes, steak and lobster, vegetables, beverages and two 
different kinds of desserts — one of them a tapioca pudding:. 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 




If there is a difference... it's WSM RADIO 

50,000 WATTS, CLEAR CHANNEL, NASHVILLE • BLAIR REPRESENTED 



sponsor • 25 may 1957 



25 



George ! 

It says here that day and night 

more people 

watch the other network ! 





That's right, Gracie. 



It's not true. 
More people watch 
the shows on our 
network. 



That's right. 





I like the X people 
better. 



Never mind what you 
like. What counts is 
that the sponsor likes 
the Y people. 
Are you sure you're 
listening, Gracie? 



Sure I'm listening. 
I was just thinking 
about Harry. 
I suppose he likes the 
Ypeople just because 
they watch little 
old Harry. 



Let's get to the point. 
Our network delivers 
an average audience 
that is 36% larger 
during the day and 
19% larger during 
the night than the 
other network. 




What's right? 



More people watc 
them less— and 
more people watc 
our shows more. 
You see, Gracie, 
there are really tv 
ways of looking a 
television— 




Oh George, you're 
beginning to talk like 
Madison Avenue, 
and it's giving me a 
terrible headache. 

Why are you telling 
me all this? 



You wanted to kno 
who is bigger, didr 
you? 




tm really, George, 
/erybody knows 
>me people squint. 



It has nothing to do 
with squinting. 

One way of watching 
television is to tune 
in occasionally during 
the course of a week 
— maybe just for two 
seconds, or for two 
minutes, or perhaps 
even a half hour. 
Let's call this X-type 
viewing. 




M 

Ml, who is bigger? We're both bigger. 




I'd say they were a 
pretty shifty bunch. 



Never mind that. Just 
pay attention. 

The second way of 
watching is to stay 
tuned in during the 
average minute of 
the average program. 
Let's call this Y-type 
viewing. This kind of 
audience is around 
when you need them. 




Bigger than what? 



Bigger than any other 
single advertising 
medium in the whole 
world. 



You mean they even 
watch Harry Von 
Zell when he's selling 
all that milk? 



Exactly. 

That's the difference 
between X viewing 
and Y viewing. 
The X viewers may 
or may not see 
Harrj But the Y 
viewers « tuaUy do 
see him — in fact. 
30,144,000 ever) 
week. Get it? 




But who's the bigger Gracie, you weren't 
network? listening. 



(What George didn't tell Gracie is that the other network's claim is based 

on a year-old Nielsen station coverage studj showing .1 lead of •»> 4 
But then. George was never one to haggle f~lT\Q Try TTWTC T f^NT r*> 

over a fraction of a percentage point.) V^DO IXlLtV 1 >J 1 \J IN SBr 



WE didn't say it 
-HE SAID IT 

". . . one of the largest mass- 
buying groups in the area." 

(L.A.) 

". . . Spanish Speaking people 
are tremendously loyal to their 
own people, especially to the 
Spanish Language commenta- 
tors . . ." 

". . . proved that the products 
advertised on KWKW literally 
snowed under the others." 



tool 



a very powerful selling 

LEE CARRAU 

In VHMc CONTACT 

A Report to Management 



WE SAY... 

Well show you how 
your clients' products 
can "Snow Under" com- 
petition 

LET US KNOW- 

• Type & Product 

• Aim of Campaign 
and we'll show you 
what KWKW can do 

CALlXUS! 




L.A.— RYan 1-6744 
S.F. — Broadcast Times Sales 
Eastern Rep. — 
National Time Sales 



I 49th and 
I Madison 



28 



Comedy commercials 

I've noted with interest your story 
"Should you get on radio's comedy 
commercial bandwagon?" in the 18 
May issue. 

Thanks for including it in a descrip- 
tion of our Pepperidge Farm bread 
commercials. Perhaps \ ou'd be inter- 
ested in some of the thinking which 
goes behind our agency's main radio 
commercials today. 

We feel radio in the past was a liv- 
ing room medium which got the com- 
plete attention of its listeners. Today 
the advertiser must compete for atten- 
tion with simple yet interest-catching 
devices. In the case of Pepperidge 
Farm, this device is such rural-associ- 
ated sound effects as the mooing of 
cows and the buzzing of bees. 
David B. McCall. associate copy chief, 
Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, Inc., N. Y. 

• SPONSOR has asked David M.I ..II for his 

complete check-list on elements in the radio com- 

mercial of 1957. This will appear in a future 
issue. 



How they started 

We read with interest sponsor's run- 
down of former NBC page boys who 
are now industry executives. 

We couldn't help but notice, how- 
ever, that our good friend. Dick Foote. 
who is now executive vice president 
and general manager of Blair Televi- 
sion Associates and who also served as 
an NBC page boy, was omitted from 
your list. 

W. L. Woods, nat'l sales manager, 
WCTV TV, Tallahassee, Fla. 

WANN gets new rep 

You omitted in Buyers Guide the fact 

that Radio Station WANN. serving the 

Baltimore, Annapolis-Eastern Shore of 

Maryland. Washington. D. C. area 

Negro market is now represented by 

Walker. 

M. H. Blum, president and 
general manager, Annapolis 
Broadcasting. Annapolis 



Credit that first lo Biow 

In last week's sponsor, Joe Csida de- 

scrihes as trail-blazing the retention of 



Frank Loesser's Frank Productions for 
the purpose of writing original music 
and lyrics for radio and tv commer- 
cials. 

Credit for the initial utilization of 
the talents of song writers with Broad- 
wa\ and Hollywood credits should go 
to Milton Biow who in 1949 on the 
writer's recommendation commissioned 
Bing Crosby's favorite songwriter Har- 
ry Revel to turn out music and lyrics 
for Biow Agency radio and tv accounts. 
Harold Kirk 
executive producer, 
Hermes Tv Productions, 
New York 



SPONSOR prime-time series 
We wish to order 200 reprints of your 
most recent article on spot buving. 
"These clients aren't prime-time blind." 

Part one of this excellent article 
l "Don't be prime-time blind ' I has 
proven invaluable to WXYZ Radio and 
we thank you for it. 

The industry can certainly use more 
pieces of this kind, sponsor is to be 
congratulated. 

Robert Baldrica. assistant sales 
manager, WXYZ Radio, Detroit 

Please consider this our order for 100 
reprints of your article "Don't be 
prime-time blind" from the March 
10th issue. 

Charles T. De\ ois. v.p. and general 
manager, WMPS, Memphis 

• Reprints on this series are availahle. The 
cost is 20c each for "Don't be prinic-tinic blind" 
and Hie each for "These clients aren't prime-time 
blind." Quantity prices are j \ ailable. 



Still KGO sales mana;;- 

Page 48 of sponsor Magazine's issue 
of April 20 (Broadcast Industry Exec- 
utives-Affiliations) incorrectly lists my 
position with KGO-TV as changed 
from Sales Manager to Sales. 

For the records. I would appreciate 
your changing your listing hack to 
'"Dave Sacks — Sales Manager, KGO- 
TV. San Francisco." 

|)a\id ML Sacks, sales manager, 
KGO-Tl . San Francisco 

• SPONSOR regrets the inadvertent transp..-i- 
lioii. 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 






Rock 
INZ- 

M-r 



.Pro 



tec."© 
TBS-; 



WJAR-AM 



AND 







WJAR-TV 1 

PIONEER STATIONS OF \ 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. i 

are pleased to announce 
the appointment of 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ATLANTA • DETROIT 
LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ST. LOUIS 

The Original Station Representative 
with the family of top stations 




SPONSOR • 25 MV'l 1 '>•■>. 



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starring CATHERINE 
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also the piaij 
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RUBENSTEII 



5 



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LEW AYRES 

Helen Mack 
v ^JJ-' Alison Skipworth 




6 



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Adele Mara 

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INVISIBLE 
INFORMER 



Linda Stirling 
William Henry 
Adele Mara 
Gerald Mohr 



A 




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MONEY 
TO BURN 

JAMES GLEASON 
LUCILLE GLEASON 
RUSSELL GLEASON 

Henry Davenport 

! \2 



15 

GHOST 
GOES WILD 

James Ellison 
Anne Gwynne 
Edward Everett Horton 



8 



STREET OF 
MISSING MEN I 



CHARLES BICKFORD 
HARRY CAREY 

Tommy Rya 
Mabel Todd 



n ijf|TI 

16 

WEB OF 
DANGER 



Adele Mara 
Robert Scott 
Adrian Booth 
Robert 

Armstrong 



Armstr ong 



BEHII 
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LLOYD NO I 
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OLE OLSEN & 
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10 



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MOONLIGHT 
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DENNIS O'KEEFE ^^^ 
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ran I fhhio f™/ \r 



NIOCTER DENNIS O'KEEFE 

1 XRLISLE - A^rii JANE FRAZEE 

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rates FRONTIER DOCTOR "No. 1 
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HOLLYWOOD 
TELEVISION 
SERVICE, INC. 

A SUBSIDIARY OF REPUBLIC PICTURES 

HOME OFFICE: 4020 Carpenter Street. 
North Hollywood, California POplar 3 8807 

32 branches in the United States and 
in Toronto, Canada, 277 Victoria 

London, England: Broadwick Street, W 1 
Telephone GERrard 5791 



nuts, opticais and compute processing 

BY 

CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 

HOLLYWOOD • FORI LEE • NEW YORK 



<W 10 WESTERNS 



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starring Don 'Red" Barry, Wally Vernon. 
Morgan Conway, Twinkle Watts 

OUTLAWS OF SANTA FE 

starring Don "Red" Barry, Wally Vernon. 
Helen Talbot. Twinkle Watts 

RAIDERS OF SUNSET PASS 

starring John Paul Revere (Eddie Dew). 
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now available plus 

ft// 263 Sensational Half-Hour Subjects 



WHEN KANSAS CITY GOES SHOPPING . . . 

It's a WHB world 



FOOD - - - 

More national food product advertising is placed on WHB than on all other local radio stations 
combined. And locally, virtually all major food chains advertise consistently on WHB. 

DRUGS . . . 

National drug advertisers and local drug stores spend more money on WHB than 
on all other local radio stations combined. 

AUTOMOTIVE . . . 

WHB carries schedules for every major national automobile advertiser. Local car dealers 
buy m ore time on WHB than on all other local radio stations combined. 



*r 



Every cigarette brand buying spot radio in Kansas City in 1956 bought WHB. 




. . . and IT'S A WHB AUDIENCE . . . 

Whether it be Metro Pulse, Nielsen, Trendex or Hooper — 

whether it be Area Nielsen or Pulse — WHB is the dominant first among every important 

audience-type. That statement embraces the housewife, her husband, their teenagers — 

as well as the farm family. Every survey agrees. Whether it's audience 

or advertising it's a WHB world! Talk to Blair or WHB GM George W. Armstrong . 



WHB 

10,000 watts on 710 kc. Kansas City, Missouri 




WDGY WHB WQAM 

Minneapolis-St. Paul Kansas City Miami 

Represented by John Blair & Co. 



TODD STORZ 

President 



=*Z, 



KOWH 

Omaha 



WTIX 

New Orleans 



Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



32 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



SPON SO R 



+- Barter time passes to client by indirect route 




SHOULD YOU BUY BARTERED TIME? 

Even Lever is considering move, but industry fears barter 
will boomerang. Here are pros and eons you musl weigh 



I I you haven't been offered a barter 
deal for spot t\ time l>\ this week, the 
chances arc good you will soon. The 
amount of film product available for 
barter, the number of film firm- using 
barter in some form, the number of 
stations who are interested, and the 
number of advertisers at least consid- 
ering a barter deal i- growing — but 
fast. 

These were some of the signs coming 
to light this week i some corroborated 
b) the companies involved, other- 
skirted around or denied i : 

• Vgain and again you hear of the 
soap giant considering a 150,000 sum- 



mer flyer into barter as an experiment. 
I hi- i- the most significant develop- 
ment in barter t>. date, for what a 
blue chip tries others nun ! -■ quick t" 
imitate. [he 9oap giant is most fre- 
quent!) identified ,i- Level Bros, for 
Pepsodenl I \ ia I < B) I he Levi i 
sponse: neither a confirmation nor de- 
nial that Pepsodenl - contem- 
plating a barter test. 

• Bai ter time alread} a< ■ ounts foi 
an important portion I in -cine ■ 
L0093 ' of the spot t\ spending of the 
foil,. win- clients: Charles \ntell. Pink 
Ice. lint n Set. Hazel Bishop, Ster- 
ling Drue, lilix k Drug. Internatimi.il 



I atex 1 orporation and Ideal I 

• Several 

making "• 01 poi ati barter 

slation: the) 

it-rate time for their ow n 1 
other advert is< 1 - \ 
mentioned are Dancer-Fil 
pie. Ruthraufi S Ryan. Emil Mogul, 

I he latt'-r has 
quired film pi s of its own which 

it will barter f"t time. 1 

• Bartei - it 

ing at the t<>p 1" veil. 

it length with media 
people in son >■ "i the topmost 
who -taied thai while thej are opposed 



SPONSOR 



23 may 1957 






Today brokers like Time Merchants, Inc. 

take over bartered time from film syndicators and 

then sell it in cut-rate packages to advertisers 



to barter, others in the agenc) look on 
its potential more favorably. 

• \ new category of middle-man is 
growing up. These might be called 
"syndicators' reps." Their function: t<> 
take the bartered time off the svndi- 
cators' hands and in return for a per- 
centage, sell it to advertisers. Time 
Merchants. I nc. u itli a LO-man Staff, is 
probabl) the biggest such operation. 
Some other organizations do a similar 
job as a sideline. Example: Paul Venze 
Associates, Charles Antell's advertising 
agencj in Baltimore. 

Because of the number of barter- 
time offers being made currently not 
only in New York but in all major ad- 
vertising centers, media departments of 
some of the biggest tv agencies who 
have not already done so will be re- 
searching barter thoroughly. Inevita- 
ble opinion among agencies and even 
w ithin agencies will be sharply split. 

These are some of the pros and cons 
advertisers and agencies contemplating 
barter time will have to consider: 

1. The price is right. There's little 
question but that some of the barter 
time is available at anywhere between 
25 and 50% of the card rate (net). 
This is a factor of no minor conse- 
quence since it enables the advertiser 
to get far more mileage (in terms of 
numbers of different announcements I 
for his advertising dollar. 

However, it is a mistake to assume 



the cut price means multiplication of 
advertising impressions per dollar. 
The chances are a major advertiser 
could buy far higher-rated announce- 
ments on his own, paying card rate. 

2. Barter makes spot tv possible for 
Ion -budget or seasonal advertiser on a 
year-round basis. The client whose to- 
tal budget would be too small to bu) 
the minimum frequency necessan to 
have tv announcements pav out. can 
now afford to try the medium. Also 
the advertiser with an essentially sea- 
sonal sales curve (like a toy manufac- 
turer I can try to even out the seasonal 
curve by experimenting with year- 
round tv advertising at a low cost. 

3. It's a cheap way to experiment 
with a new advertising approach or a 
new product. But it's not a fool-proof 
or scientific way of experimenting 
since the advertiser doesn't control a 
bulk barter buy the way he does a nor- 
mal spot tv schedule. 

Then there are these out-and-out 
negatives. 

1. There's no cancellation clause in 
barter contracts. The advertiser com- 
mits a fixed sum of money from the 
start and cant exit from the deal for 
anywhere from a year upward. Thus 
the client loses one of the biggest ad- 
vantages of spot tv: flexibility. 

If his competitor suddenly switches 
media strategy or some other develop- 
ment dictates a change in approach to 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiin 



BARTER 
ADVANTAGES 

1. Low-price saturation is made 

possible through barter. Client in effect 
buys tonnage at 25 to 50% off net card 
rate. It can double reach of ad dollar. 

2. Small-budget advertiser can 

afford to spread his coverage or extend 
seasonal campaigns into year-'round ef- 
forts. It can help him open new markets. 

3. Newcomers to tv fan experi- 
ment with new copy themes, various ad 
approaches at low cost, yet effective 
frequency to give them a yardstick. 



BARTER 
DISADVANTAGES 

1. "Pig-in-a-poke" sale* approach 
in most barter deals makes it hard for 
agency or client to evaluate what he's 
getting and whether the buy is worth it. 

2. Lack of cancellation clause 

sews client into long-term commitment 
before he knows whether it's good for 
him or not. He can't improve schedule. 

3. Fixed pre-emptible basis of 

most bulk barter buys doesn't give cli- 
ent assurance of continuity of his effort, 
makes it hard to merchandise to trade. 



tv, he can't get out of his bulk com- 
mitment. 

2. The sponsor is buying a pig in a 
poke. The barter-time peddlers can 
rarely spell out which stations and 
which times the bulk client will get for 
a fixed cut-rate figure. The advertiser 
has to give the barter-time merchant 
wide latitude in making the time buy 
for him: he pays in advance for bulk 
tonnage that ma\ not fulfill his adver- 
tising objectives. 

Pretts typical of the barter-time 
pitches currently making the rounds 
is a 200-market presentation Paul 
Venze made to a nationally advertised 
detergent. SPONSOR read this presenta- 
tion in the media department of an 
agency close to the top in air media 
billings under — literally — an oath not 
to reveal the agenc\'s name. (It- 
characteristic of barter-time deals that 
the participants rarely want to ac- 
knowledge being involved — even if no 
deal has actually been made.) 

The Paul Venze presentation was a 
masterpiece of detailed information so 
scientific and specific as to do credit to 
the best work by a national rep. It con- 
tained the cost of the announcements 
in each market at card rate — and at 
the barter rate: the estimated cumula- 
tive rating: the estimated number of 
viewers reached: the cost-per- 1,000. In 
fact, only two details were left out of 
the presentation: the call letters of the 
stations and the times. 

3. The time involved is generally 
not as good as card-rate time. The 
reasons are self-evident: The station 
giving time in exchange for program- 
ing can barter away only the time no- 
body else bought. 

4. Bartered time is generally on a 
"fixed pre-emptible basis" meaning 
that a full-rate advertiser can auto- 
matically take possession of anv choice 
adjacency occupied by the barter ad- 
vertiser. However, a number of ad- 
men whose companies use bartered 
time found this a relatively negligible 
drawback. 

"It doesn't happen too often," savs 
Mel Helitzer, advertising manager of 
Ideal Toy Co.. which has been enabled 
to expand its tv advertising around the 
year instead of its customarv brief net- 
work season as a result of cheap bulk 
buying through Time Merchants, Inc. 
"Most of the stations that were on. be- 
cause they've acquired film program- 
ing through barter, don't preempt us 
because the\ "ve got time available for 
more advertisers." 






'.I 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1951 




TIME MERCHANTS, INC. 



Working oul oi it- president's lush Plaza Hotel suite, n\i- nen "syndii 

10-man stafl including (1. to r.) Vbraham Kavadlo, comptroller; Joseph Lobel, 

Dick Firestone, ass'l t<> pres. ; l>i'k Rosenblatt, pres.; Bob May, 



5. You usually can't improve m«r 
schedule after you've bought. Like a 
fire sale, you cant make exchanges 
once you've plunked down the cash. 

But this is not true in ever) instance. 
Ideal To) claims to have bad relative- 
I) good choices of time periods as well 
.i~ some latitude through it- Time Mer- 
chants buy. Furthermore, Dick Rosen- 
blatt, president of Time Men bants, 
Inc.. told SPONSOR in an interview con- 
ducted in liis lush Plaza Hotel suite 
i he s planning to open new Madison 
Vvenue offices b) fall when a building 
on 59th Street is completed > : 

"'We re in a position to tailor an ad- 
vertiser's hulk schedule as an individ- 
ual syndicator could not do. In fact, 
in some cases we find out an adver- 



tiser's need- firsl and then alert the 
syndicators to the times the) should 
request from stations." 

Often, b) stitching together the bar- 
ter schedules From several syndicators, 
lime Merchants claims it can offei i 
I atchquilt of time periods \ irtuall) • ul 
t" the advertiser's size. Their most 
pressing problem, however, is ucttin^ 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

As barter spreads in rv. more clients 
are being offered cut-rate bulk satu- 
rations. Biggest client advantage is 
low cost. Drawbacks include ( 1 hav- 
ing to buy blind; 2 lack of cancella- 
tion privilege; 3 no renewal clause; 
4 low quality of stations and time. 



the deals sewed up in tim< 

advertise] and l! 

time together at tin- righl moment. 

\ 4<nh secondary 
turn- wailable through ba 

deals. \- the media exei utii • 
of the top thrt 
anal) sis of barrel "You'n 
fourth station in a foi 
the uhf in a \hf market "i th< station 
in a tertiar) market." 

Bui tin- - • -- I • .;. I 

i ung stations h.i film 

through at least partial barter d< 
including the W ise and the 

( roslej stations, and - NBI o&o's, 

Bui on the whole, it stands !•• reason 
that tin- top-rated station in a market. 
' Please turn to 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 









WALTER LOWEN ON AD MANPOWER 

Tht* man who filled 100,000 tv, radio and advertising jobs takes look at 
Madison Avenue today, sees salaries at plateau, no acute adman shortage 



I his month, after 36 years in the 
field of advertising personnel place- 
ment, during which he found jobs for 
more than 100.000 employees, Walter 
A. Lowen himself starts a new job. 

Lowen's job: recruitment consultant 
to management. His first assignment: 
replace two board chairmen — one in 
the houseware manufacturing field, the 
other in an advertising agency. 

The Walter A. Lowen Placement 
Agency which he has now left, and 
which presently contains about 96 feet 
of filing cabinet space crammed with 
applications for advertising, radio and 
tv positions, will be continued by his 
daughter and former partner. Ruth. 

What made Lowen. often called 
U. S. placement expert No. 1, make 
this move? "I've watched the man- 
agement consultant organizations en- 
tering the field of employment place- 
ment." he told sponsor during a 
session in his Park Avenue apartment. 

"Unhampered by licensing, their 
commissions mav run to 20 'r of an 
annual salary whereas my employment 
agency license restricted me to 5%. 
So I gave up my license." He grinned 
broadly, fingered some tulips in a vase 
on the coffee table, and added. "Also 
I 11 be able to spend more time in 
Connecticut. That's where I grew these 
tulips.' (Lowen has a six-acre farm 
about four miles from Danburv. ) "You 
see," he went on, "I'll only accept a 
limited number of recruitment assign- 
ments for kev men in those fields with 
which I'm familiar." 

Probably no one is more familiar 
with the field of advertising than is 
Lowen. Mild-mannered and sympa- 
thetic, he has held the crying towel 
for hundreds of admen who have sud- 
denly had the rug pulled from under 
them. He has helped them through 
domestic troubles and assisted in the 
rehabilitation of some who were drown- 
ing in martinis. 

One of the latter was the late, great 



< o|i\ writer Howard Newton, creator of 
"Mr. Coffee-Nerves." The first day he 
reported to Pedlar & Rvan Agency on 
Lowen's recommendation, he came 
down with d.t.'s. Newton went to the 
Coast to recuperate, pulled himself to- 
gether, went into the agency business 
in California. But he longed for New 
York, and wrote Lowen who spoke to 
Walter Weir at J. M. Mathes Agency. 
Newton was hired, later became copy 
chief, a position he held until Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample hired him at $45,- 
000, once more at Lowen's recom- 
mendation. While at D-F-S, Newton 
himself opened an employment agency 



for copywriters. "Howard was a very 
charming and talented guy." Lowen 
says. 

"In this fast-paced advertising busi- 
ness," says Lowen, who doesn't drink 
or smoke because tobacco bites his 
tongue and alcohol doesn't agree, "it's 
easy to fall into the martinis-for-lunch 
routine. But it's too competitive and 
demanding a business to risk \our 
health following it.'" 

Across the desk from Lowen. at one 
time or another since December 1920 
when he and his wife started The 
Vocational Bureau in a cramped and 
dingy office at 42nd Street and Fifth 




LOWEN'S TIPS FOR EMPLOYERS 



a 



a 



An employer must create an atmosphere where million- 
dollar ideas can grow. Many agency heads are now 
interested in Motivational Research in connection with 
consumers. They might well MR at home in under- 
standing their employees. Any creative person is apt 
to be temperamental, given to up-and-down moods. 
It's part of the creative pattern. The smart employer 
understands this and profits through living with it. JJ 

Many employers are too specific in their require- 
ments. They tend to "type-cast" job applicant;- on 
past performances only. Yet a lot of personnel are 
extremely versatile, have many strings to their bows. 
If one of these has proved his ability in a single area 
such as a food campaign, it does not mean that he 
might not do just as well or better on automotives. M 






36 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



Avenue, have sal man) of the t ■ • [ » men 
in advertising. The) brought theii job 
problems i" the Lowens. Sometimes 
Lowen f < > u iK I them jobs, sometimes he 
advised them to staj where the) were. 
One jimim executive, benl on leaving 
lii- agency, finally took Lowen's advice 
to sta) put. When he did finall) leave 
-tunc years later, he took f] million 
with him. 

The li-t el those whom Lowen has 
steered into top-level agenc) or radio-h 
jobs is legion. Vmong them are such 
well known names as Myron kirk. 
Kudner; Lewis Titterton, Compton; 
Bob Foreman, BBDO; Bill Seth, Mac- 
Manus, John \ Vdams; Herb Gunter, 
red Bates; Garth Montgomery, K,\l : 
to mention just a few. In a publica- 
tion's listing of 100 "top" copywriters, 
(>7 were Lowen "alumni." 

Lowen, a Columbia graduate and 
veteran of World War I. had his firsl 
brush with Madison Vvenue as a cub 
copywriter at Calkins & Holden in New 
York. One of his co-workers was an 
18-year old checking clerk Ed Ebel, 
now vice president in charge ol adver- 
tising foi General Foods. In the years 
since, Lowen has seen the same 




and ups-and-dOwns, During the earl) 
30's, placement of advertising person- 
nel fell to -in h a low thai I owen, his 
h it'- and daughtei ate I <• dinners al 
' i I v * • i 's ( afetei ia. \t no pei iod did he 
lose faith in the Vvenue oi fail to lose 
sight of opportunities thai always will 
exisl foi those who have someth 
to contribute. 

How then dor- In- see the advertis- 
ing field of toda) ? 

• Salai n- h 1 1 i«li ha\ e mo\ ed 
Bteadil) upward seemed to reai li a 
temporar) plateau this year. 

• Marketing offers great challei 
and opportunities. 

• Women in advertising still take 
themselves too sei iousl) . 

• Employers might well use Motiva- 
tional Research within their own agen- 
cies in dealing m ith personnel. 

• I here is no acute shoi tage of 
manpower in advertising. I nemploy- 
men! i- at a minimum. 

• Some wise agenc) head- are be 
coming a little less arbitrar) about 
age as a job requirement. Advertising 
is not. as was believed foi awhile 
strictl) a "young man- game." 

Lowen. patentl) anxious to take off 
n his Connecticut farm 



nevertheless settled his husk) d 

i '.n ( h.u let i haii and, h ith the 
pain in i- developed in years of dealin 
with people, answered sponsor's quea 
■ 

"\\ hat about job hopping in the 
■ | business .'" we asked. "\\ hen 
should an employed adman think about 
making a i hai 

1 1 he - ' onsidei ing a i hat 
Lowen said thoughtfully, "he must 
considei foui things ■ I ■ I he new job 
should have as nun h ■•! more set m it ■ 
than the present one (2l It must offei 
more opportunit) foi advancement 
It musl be in as happ) or happiei 
n\ ironment. I I I It musl pa) more 
mone) . 

\\ e remai ked that the lattei 
probabl) the biggt si i onsideration. 

Lowen laughed. "* m the i onb - 
it - the l.i-t < onsidei ation. I f the othei 
' onsidei ation- don i prevail, n 
h on I ii impensate. 

"Bui i-n i it frequentl) hard ' 
out of your salar) bra< led '" we asked. 

"1 1-." Lowen said. "People - 
times get 'typed 1 as to income, jusl as 
the) often are "t\ pe-< ast' in jobs. 
i Main of I. owen'- phrases and analo- 
gies are theal i i' .d Bint e theatre is his 



a 



a 



LOWEN'S TIPS FOR EMPLOYEES 

II .hi employee is considering a change in jobs, he 
musl consider these lour tltitijz-: I 1 I The new job musl 
have as much or more securit) than the present one. 

(2) It musl offer more opportunit] for advancement 

(3) It musl be in as bappj or happiei an environment. 
i 1 t It musl paj mote money. The last i- certainbj 
important, I ul remember thai il the other considi 
lions (In not prevail, mone) alone won't compensate. JJ 

If you are applying for a creative job, it 
cially desirable thai you take an idea "r two along 
with you. To take an idea ti» an interview . . . i- to 
pla.e yourself in a preferred position foi a job. Uso, 
rehearse before hand \vlmt you want to saj al tli«- 
interview . . . even practice imaginary interviews 
before your mirror, You'll be more al ease tl>i- way.yj 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



37 



hobby.) Man) employers are too 
fie In their job requirements. The) 
tr) to pin-point Eor too specialized a 
Their lack of imagination ham- 
pers their getting the most for their 

ne) that i-. the liest person. A lot 

of employees have mam strings to 
their bows, but because they have 
proved their ability in onl) one area. 
such as handling a food campaign, 
the) ma) not be considered for an 
automotive account." 

"Speaking of - tv pe-easting.' " we put 
in. "is there really a Madison \\enue 
type?" 

'I guess you could find some coun- 
terparts of the admen depicted in 
novels," Lowen said. "In fact. I've 
had some agencies request a 'non- 
Madison Avenue type.' But whether a 
fellow wears a grey-flannel suit or 
not seems to me unimportant. It's what 
he can contribute creatively that 
counts. Sometimes there's too much 
emphasis on little things like that. One 
agency missed getting one of the 
reallv great creative tv men because 
it objected to his wearing loafers. He 
said, 'If they don't like my loafers, the 
hell with 'em.' ' 

\\ hat does Lowen think of psycho- 
logical tests in screening applicants? 

"I'm sold on them to a certain de- 
gree." he said. "To test a salesman for 
resilience and other characteristics 
needed in that field, such tests may be 
fine. Yet as a personnel man, I feel 
I've developed a sixth sense in picking 
the right man for the right job, and 
prefer it to tests. Some tests I think 
are superficial. And in the case of 



ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

After 36 years of operating a place- 
ment agency for advertising personnel, 
Walter Lowen moves out to become a 
recruitment consultant to management. 
He sees Adland in a healthy state with 
steady demand for personnel, a supply 
of talent to fill, and salaries high. 



such complex, creative types as radio- 
l\ executives or copywriters, it's 
dangerous to rely entirelv on a test." 

It is this great, deep understanding 
of employees that probabl) has enabled 
Lowen to so efficiently serve emplovers. 
"Too many employers mishandle crea- 
tive people, then wonder why they 
lose them. And having lost them, thev 
then wonder how they manage to do 
such a bang-up job for the next em- 
plo) er. 

"The well of creativity.' Lowen went 
on. "must be nursed. An employer 
must create an atmosphere where mil- 
lion-dollar ideas can grow. Many 
agency heads are now interested in 
Motivational Research in connection 
with consumers. They should also 
apply it in their own shops. Any cre- 
ative person is bound to be somewhat 
temperamental, given to up-and-down 
moods. It's part of the creative pattern. 
The smart employer understands this, 
learns to live with it because ideas 
are the heart and soul of advertising." 

Do good jobs often go begging for 
long, Ave wanted to know. 

"In the $25,000-and-up range, a job 
may take months to fill,"' Lowen said. 




In touch: Lowen'snew role as management On the go: Operating from his Park Avenue apart- 
consultant keeps him close to ad job field ment, Lowen continues manhunts for top-echelon jobs 



"Wouldn't it help it they raised the 
age limits?" we asked. 

"They're actually higher now than 
the) used to he. Back in the "40"s the 
word was that 'Advertising is a young 
man's game.' Age 40 came pretty close 
to the limit. But then many of the 
older men proved their worth, and the 
young men meanwhile got 10 years 
older, so toda) the average age limit 
for top echelon jobs is nearer 55. 

"Fringe benefits which tend to pull 
down age limits, aren't always needed 
hv the older man. He may already 
have his own annuities. There are a 
number of specialists and consultants 
drawing $250 a day who might be 
gotten full-time for S25.000 a year if 
emplovers take a more realistic ap- 
proach to the age problem. 

In the past few years, Lowen told 
sponsor, there has been a marked 
increase in placements of marketing 
personnel at salaries up to $50,000. 

As for tv and radio, these media 
have helped raise the salaries of admen 
to their present high plateau, which 
Lowen assured us is in line with the 
rise of income in other fields. "Time- 
buying," he added, "has really given 
the girls a break." 

The mention of girls recalled a com- 
ment bv Lowen in the book he 
authored in 1941 with Lillian W atson 
titled. "How to Get a Job and Win 
Success in Advertising." I In 1954, 
Lowen wrote another book — "How and 
When to Change Your Job Success- 
fully." It will be syndicated this fall 
as a newspaper feature by the A ew 
York Herald Tribune). The quote we 
reminded Lowen about was: "One of 
the greatest faults of women in ad- 
vertising ... is that they take them- 
selves too seriously." We asked if 
this was as true today as in 1941? 

"Yes, it is," Lowen replied. "" v 
great many women try too hard. As 
career women, they feel they must 
prove themselves over and over again. 
For some reason, successful women 
feel less successful than successful 
men." 

Perhaps, we suggested, this is be- 
cause of the salary differential. 

Lowen admitted that, as a rule, 
women are paid less for the same per- 
formance than is a man. "But there 
are more lady v.p.'s appearing on the 
radio-tv scene," Lowen said. "And 
some time ago, I placed a woman who 
had a special knowledge of cosmetics 
into a two-day a week position at 
$25,000 a year." ^ 



38 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



Dr. Sydney Roslow, direct i The 

Pulse, baa long looked i"i new ways to 
measure media. Foi two years he's 
worked on i formula t" give print and 
air media the same < ommon denomina- 
tor. \"» he feels he's found it. 
This week he announced a new rat- 
big system, .1 cost-per-1,000 homes 
remembering ads in different media 



FOUND: 




A NEW ALL-MEDIA YARDSTICK 

So says Pulse, which this week unveiled a hcm w;i\ to compare 
print vs. radio and television based on advertising remembrance 



I hi* week The Pulse's Syd Roslow 

announced lie had found what media 
buyers have always sought and main 
concluded couldn't be found: a single 
yardstick for print and broadcast 
media. 

\\ itli the announcement Roslow 
dropped this bombshell: 

When measured on his new yard- 
stick, which is hased on cost per re- 
membered impression, newspaper costs 
were as much as 40 times higher than 
radios and as much as 15 times higher 
than television's. (While magazines 
were not included in the study, the 
method could he applicable to a maga- 
zine's circulation in am given market I 



Roslow unveiled his new single yard- 
stick before some 200 agencj and ad- 
vertise] executives lasl Wednesda) al .1 
breakfast in New York. He'll es 
it ln-foie other molders "t media opin- 
ion in three more advertising centers 
later this month: San Francisco, Los 
Angeles and Chicago. 

^ "ti can assume that e\ erj w here S] d 
Roslow presents bis multi-media yard- 
stick the first question will be thai old 
perennial: "How can you mix apples 
and oran. 

How doe- Roslow's yardstick work.' 
\nd win doe- lie think one i- needed 
iii the fir-t place ' 

The "win" i- easier to grasp than 



the how . Rostov ted sort- 

ing media apples Iron 
"I w - • fiit al newspapers ah 

showing those big bars "I circulation 
contrasted with the tin) ones of bn 
1 asting." 

He wondered win so mat ■ 
tisers, retailers in partii alar, 
an "all <>r none" philosophy about the 
broadi asl media. I i 
that newspapers were doii tive 

and efficient job of selling the • 
sumer. But he likewise hail no doubts 
that t\ and radio, in combination with 
new - - 1 alone, could deliver the 

kind of rr-ult<. 
Then he got to the "how." 



*Yor details on the problem <>t deve ttick, see sponj 

"All-Media Evaluation Studs" which is a vital part ot the continuing anahsis oi media 
by this publication. Studs later appeared as a book. Copies available at $4 each. 



Baltimore survey shows tv and radio get 
biggest remembrance tor client's media dollar 



He knew, from the past experience 
of media, what would not tend to give 
equitable media comparisons. 

• Print, being tangible, was more 
measurable — and print people have 
been prone to measure a newspaper or 
magazine in terms of issues printed 
and copies circulated. "The practice 
developed," says Roslow, "of quoting 
to advertisers the number of sheets of 
paper printed, sold or delivered." But 
this didn't answer how many people 
actually picked up that newspaper and 
read the advertiser's product copy. 

• A newspaper's total circulation 
has been variously compared with a 
station's estimated total circulation 
I "estimated" because of the intangible 
character of the medium itself I or w ith 
the rating of a quarter-hour program 
period. Obviously, a program cannot 
be equated to an entire newspaper. 

A program segment is closer — more 
comparable— to a single editorial fea- 
ture of a newspaper - - maybe the 
woman's column, or an editorial. 
These still cannot be accurately com- 
pared, says Roslow. because the com- 
mercial is inside a radio or tv program 
segment and attracts a "captive" type 
of audience. On the other hand, the 
newspaper advertisement runs adja- 
cent to rather than within the editorial 
feature. So you can find no accurate 
measurement of numbers of persons 
reached by the advertising copy. 

• There's another — more statistical 
— reason why ad notings (such as 
Daniel Starch surveys) of printed ad- 
vertisements are not comparable to 
quarter-hour program ratings. Read- 
ership surveys are confined to persons 
who are known to read the paper; non- 
readers are discarded. But. Roslow 
says, broadcast ratings are based on 
an all-home sample, including non- 
listeners and non-viewers in the base. 

Two years ago Pulse started to bring 
these random elements of the measure- 
ment picture into focus. Since then, in 
eight markets, it has conducted print 
and broadcast studies with similar 
bases for stations in these markets. 

Pul-e draws a representative house- 
hold sample. Interviewers visit homes 
in this sample, asking every member 
of the family what they remember see- 
ing in the newspaper or hearing on 
radio or seeing on television. These 



results — when projected — indicate the 
number of households in the metro- 
politan area reached by a specific ad- 
vertisement or commercial. This is the 
"rating" — applicable to print as well 
as to tv and radio. 

The profile looks like this: 

In Salt Lake City, the average quar- 
ter-hour rating of six radio stations is 
3.4 l reaching 3.4% of all homes in the 
metropolitan area), contrasted with 
the average rating for advertisements 
in the Salt Lake City Tribune, 3.4: and 
the average for those in the Deseret 
News. 3.7. 

Compare these remembrance ratings 
with the type of figures formerly used. 

Daily newspaper circulation I morn- 
ing and evening editions) in Rich- 
mond, Va.. reaches into 95% of the 
homes in the area. Daily radio totals 
average about 48% ( for two stations) ; 
tv. some 80% (three stations) . 

But how many of these homes ever 
noticed an advertiser's message? And 
what did it cost? 

To answer this final question, Pulse 
started analyzing Baltimore as a test 
market three months ago. 

Here's what the company did, as 
Roslow explains it. 

"Our job was to attain commercial 
remembrance ratings for (both news- 
paper and broadcast ) advertising. A 
tv station and a radio station were 
monitored from 6 p.m. to midnight 
( note radio, low in tunein during the 
measured nighttime hours, was mini- 



mized at the very start ) . The next 
evening, viewers and listeners were 
shown a list of commercials which had 
been aired and asked to identif\ those 
they remembered. Pulse used the re- 
call system which is standard for tv 
and radio ratings. 

There were 2,000 homes in the total 
sample: 500 each ^different homes) 
for the tv station, the radio station, 
the Baltimore News-Post and the Bal- 
timore Sun. Each sample included 
"non-viewers, non-listeners, non-read- 
ers so the measurements have the same 
meaning," says Roslow. 

Some 20 interviewers in a two-week 
period visited these sample homes no 
longer than one dav after the newspa- 
per or broadcast copy was released. 

Despite the outcome — favorable to 
tv and radio — the survey from the 
start was bound to give every advan- 
tage to newspapers on at least three 
scores. 

1. The measuring period for radio, 
as pointed out above, was from 6 p.m. 
to midnight. Daytime tunein is much 
higher. Newspaper and television were 
measured at a peak "audience" time, 
radio, at the ebb. 

2. Interviewers in talking with fam- 
ilies in the two newspaper panels, ex- 
hibited a sample copy of the paper, 
flipping page by page to have the mem- 
ber of the household point to anv re- 
membered advertisement. 

No such "prop" or reminder is 
a\ailable in tv and radio I although 
Pulse has done some experimentation 
along these lines, introducing parts of 
radio jingles and tv frames I . The tv 
and radio sample homes were merely 



Roslow points to depth findings 



Pulse invents a new cost-per- 
1.000 system. Interviewers visit 
homes to ask each family member 
what he remembers from previous 
day's newspapers, radio and tv 
-how ~. Remembrance factor is the 
actual "reach" the rating. This 
rating is converted to dollars: what 
it costs in each medium to reach 
1' , nt homes in a market. w ben 
data are available on all major mar- 
kets, buyers will have all-media 
cost ratios as a new buying guide. 



Illllllllllllllllilllll!!llll!!llllllllllllllllllllli:i!lll!!ll!lllllll! 





in 



SPONSOR 



25 mai 195' 



confronted with two 01 throe ke\ 
words from the commercials and 
asked il the) remembered them. 

3. Thuradaj warn -•■ l.-. ted aa the 
reading and listening base and Thurs- 
day i- the best-read week-da) foi an) 
newspapei because of it- shopping 
news .mil li«.i\\ food store advertising. 
Papers have long since coincided theii 
editorial Features and their advertising 
with women's shopping habits. \n.l 
most women * I « » most oi their house- 
hold shopping on Thursday , 

Despite these balances toward the 
pi i r 1 1 Bide of the si -;ilc>. i\ and radio 
can. i- oul w iih some astounding figures. 

Pulse worked up ratings and adapt- 
ed them to tin- question : How much 
does ii cosl an advertiser to reach I ' i 
of the metropolitan area homes (based 
on the U. S. ( lensus classification I ? 

I he answers came from the Balti- 
more survey, but Pulse think- they're 
representative of the ratio- in almost 
an) market, i See chart i 

1 Omparing all three radio. t\ and 

newspaper an advertiser would find 
he is reaching 1', of the Baltimore 
households at widel) varying cost ra- 
ti"-. II you give newspaper the edge, 
again, and take the lowest newspaper 
cost (see chart) $223 and the high- 
est iadio $13 and the highesl tele- 
\i-ion $39- \ou find these ratio-: 

lo reach exactl) the same number 
oi households, an advertiser gets more 
than 17 times a s much audience for 
bis mone) in radio than in newspaper, 
more than five times as much in tele- 
vision than in newspaper. But the av- 
erage newspaper cosl i> far higher. 

Does this mean newspapers should 
go out of business, that advertisers 
ahould cancel? 

I ertainl) not, says Roslow. He's 
ju>t arguing for re-evaluation. 

The "plain sense of these findings," 
■i- he told admen \\ ednesda) . "is nol 
one ot criticism of printed advertising. 
It i- to point out that when comparable 
surement methods are employed 
the broadcast media can stand up to 
the print media. It suggests a re-ex- 
amination and re-allocation of adver- 
tising budgets ma) he in order." 

"Newspapers have been effective, 
and print advertising has sold goods. 
But this has been built on small num- 

- of persons seeing the ad and not 
on large circulation numbers. In radio 
and t\ the ratings are generall) larger. 
I he coordination of the two media can 
result in much greater numbers of per- 
sons reached. Such a determination 
can come from true measurement." ^ 



SPONSOR 



2.i \m 1957 



COST OF REACHING 1% OF 
POPULATION, PRINTVS. AIR 



The Baltimore Sun 



Space size 



Space cost 



Cost for 1 



Full pa 



lie 



►42 



$223 



..-t'nlM 






350 



i ,.i 



hid 



315 



's-'r 



r20 



323 



70-294 lines' 1 



172 



287 



The Baltimore News-Post 



Space size 


Space cost 


Cost for 1 °o 




Full page 


11,560 


$339 




'-lull 


1,176 


267 




1 ,.!.,* 


",: || | 


452 




l / 8 -V4* 


294 


490 




70-294 lines 


122 


610 





Time period 



Tv Station 

Time costs 



Cost for 1 



6-7 p.m. and 
1 I p.m.-rnidnighl 



$120 



$17 



7-8 p.m. 


150 


21 




8-10:30 p.m. 


27.") 


39 




10:30-1] p.m. 


200 


28 





Radio Station 



Time period 


Time costs 


Co 


>t for 1 °o 


6-7 p.m. 


122 




$13 


7 p.m-midnighl 


15 




9 



* mid-point f 2 s eco nd umomicaneal 

+ nne-niimite announcement Source: F'ul-e Btnch in iSaltimnrr- 









MATTRES! 



TV HUMOR PROVES 
THE PERFECT SLEEPER 

Off-beat tv sell boosts Serta Mattress of 
Pittsburgh from 14th to fifth in Serta sales 



I he macabre in mattress merchan- 
dising lias pro\en a /am -iiccess for 
the Serta Co. of Pittsburgh. Serta's 
agency, Goldman and Shoop took the 
late movie on KDKA-TV, built it into 
"Sertada\ Nite." a show featuring 
startling humor, a sprinkling of corn 
and a staid announcer, Carl Ide, who 
takes all in stride without even a smile. 

Serta's commercials are often forci- 
bly integrated into the movie theme. 
The break in swash-buckling sea thrill- 
er might see Ide and an expert swords- 



man in a gripping duel — during which 
a mattress is deftly sliced to reveal 
its quality construction. 

Unparalleled audience reaction t<> 
these commercials in terms of both 
sales and letters lead to a similar series 
of spot announcements with Bob Trow 
as announcer and fall guy. 

Pittsburgh plant sales have soared 
from 14th to fifth among all of Serta's 
44 assembly plants — a result of being 
the most discussed television sponsor 
in that area. ^ 



"No lumps, no bumps, no humps, no buttons, no nuttin"' slogan i- investigated by Carl 
Ide in Serta commercial. Thorough check of mattress requires binoculars, stethoscope 





Funny commercials, drj and slapstick 
are used. Personal endorsement sought by 
Ide (above) i- tame in comparison to . . . 




Sword-fight splits mattress for viewers 




Bob Trow, sponsor-heckled announcer 




Slapstick pie-in-the-face is a -tuple . . 




Careful check of results shows amazing 
audience response in letters and sales, 
requests for schedule of the commercials 



SPONSOR • 2.") M\Y 195^ 






Spot radio 1st quarter 
1956 



Spot television 1st quarter 
1956 



$34,750,000 
1957 



$100,209,000 






1957 



$48,827,000 



'57 gain over '■">'> is 10.5%, as reported bj 
Station Representatives Ktsn. Some stations 
have increased liillin^- 1>\ .i- i h ,i- .iO% 



$116,935,000 



^|n.i tv's growth rati is 11.1 omputed b) Televis Bureau ol 

tising. Bui actual dollai increase is 16 in below). Hulk 

ol iej spenl on h -i">t is l"i announcei i- during ili<- nighttimi ; 



SPOT'S FIRST QUARTER: RADIO UP 40.5 
TV 11.6 OVER LAST QUARTER 

Spot radio makes a huge gain despite its own records and network radio's 

revival; tv, still outdoing print media growth, enters a slower cycle 



1J /V r\ I ^\ m Spot radio hillings arc /oominu fai 

above the dollar limits sel 1>\ the 
mbsl blue-sk) of optimists. 

January, Februarj and March the first quarter of hard 
selling, fast-buying 1957 saw a peak billing of almost $49 
million. The actual figures, from the Station Representa- 
tives \--n.: $48,827,000 for this year contrasted with $34,- 
750,000 during the same period in L956 a whopping in- 
crease of 40.. V < (based on gross time sales). 

\ in' . -plus nain in the spot radio medium at this stage of 

the broadcasl game is nothing less than phenomenal. Bill- 
ings have been so big that main observers anticipated a 
slower rate of growth after what the\ saw as a leveling-off 
point last \ear. Thev also noted the rising interest and 
investment — by national and regional advertisers in network 
radio. 

Both network and spot people think a large -hare of net- 
work monies is coming from spot radio budgets. i el the) 
were obviousl) wrong. Network radio hasn't been making 
so many sales for a decade — yel neither has spot 

Larr\ Webb, managing director of SRA, comment- on 
these new figures it has released. "\\ ithout an\ question, 
the tremendous increase can he attributed to the heaw satu- 
ration spot campaigns in the top major markets. 



T™\A» Spol i\ i- -lill growing fastei than most othei 
media even though the -pec ta< ular jump- of past 
years seem to he shaking down into a more mature _io\sth 
pattern. Spol i\ i- in a stead) climb rathei thin i 
like spol ladio i-. It- high-water level for the first quarter 
hil v l 1 7 million. 

So says the television Bureau of Advertising, which re- 
port- a billing increase ovei the firsl quarter in 1956 of 
11.6%. This growth i- impressive, but n ual than 

during -pot u - eai lier j ears. 

The spol tv figures: -I 1''.'' 15,000 ilii- firsl quarter in '57 
contra-icd with $100,209,000 foi the same '56 period. 

The ll.ii', figure represents the rate of growth ol 
dollar time investments on onl) _'">"> tv stations. MB I' 
dent Norman < ash -a\- Y < . Rorabaugh, who computes the 
-pot reports for the -roup, bad 267 stations in the base last 
year, '>J1 tin- year. I" gel an ai tual . n, there- 

fore. TvB used the 255 tv stations submitting their billing 
figures during both years. Hie difference between the dol- 
lar total- repoi ted for each year coi es to ; 

\ TvB breakdown -how- f spot tv business was 

placed in nighttime hour-: daytime; late 

night W < of the business was placed for announcements; 
21.1''.. participations; 19.9%, programs; 1 1 :•">' < . I.D.'s. 



TURN PAGE FOR TOP lOO SPOT TV CLIENTS IN FIRST QUARTER ► 



SPOT'S FIRST QUARTER continued 



Top lOO spot tv advertisers for the first quarter of 1957 









RANK 



ADVERTISER 



1ST QUARTER 
1956 



1ST QUARTER 
1957 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 
6. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 



Procter \ • ramble 
Brow ii \ \\ illiamson 
Sterling Drug 

Continental Baking 



Carter Products _ 
Philip Morris 
General Foods 
Warner-Lambert 
Colgate-Palmolive 
National Biscuit 
Miles Laboratories ._ 
International Latex .. 
Liggett \ Myers _. 
American Tobacco .. 
Lever Bros. 
Grove Laboratories ... 

Ford 

Coca-Cola 

Pepsi Cola _ 

Kellogg 

American Chicle 

P. Lorillard _ 

Bulova 

Esso Standard Oil 

Robert Hall _ 

Corn Products Refining 

Max Factor 

Avon 

Lipton 

American Home Products 
Food Manufacturers __ 
Harold E. Ritchie 

Glamorene 

\estle 

Peter Paul 

Adell Chemical 

Beech-Xut Life Savers .... 

Block Drug 

Plough. Inc. _. 

Helaine Seager 

Charles Antell 

Tea Council 

Minute Maid .. 
Texas Co. .. 

Seven-Up 

Shell Oil 
Simmons _ 
R. J. Reynolds 

J. A. Folger 

Ballantine 



$5,782,800 
2,921,900 
2,252,800 

761,400 
1,059,900 
1,542,200 
2,053,800 

725,900 
1.5! S3. 100 
1,478,400 
1,696,900 

1.122,900 

471.(10(1 
(.50.700 
985,100 
054.800 
373.700 

1.780.000 
224,300 
229.500 

1.228.400 
531,500 
869,100 
425,900 

174.100 
212,800 
313.800 

642.000 
264,200 
542.400 

724.700 

262.700 
751.200 
310.500 
725.200 
847,300 
1(13.800 
839.100 

368.400 
324.600 



187,800 
531,300 
146,700 



$3,726,800 

3,633,000 

2,942,900 

2,822,000 

2,447,100 

1,993,000 

1,922,600 

1,882,800 

1,688,800 

1,611,300 

1,535,700 

1,408,700 

1,397,400 

1,317,600 

1,313,500 

1,211,600 

1,168,300 

1,155,300 

1,143,900 

1,105,800 

1,085,000 

1,012,300 

1,002,200 

919,100 

910,800 

846,800 

794,600 

765,200 

728,100 

718,400 

696,700 

692,600 

667,100 

652,003 

650,400 

640,400 

639,100 

603,600 

591,500 

586,100 

583,600 

581,600 

579,500 

576,100 

574,900 

530,200 

525,200 

491,600 

488,300 

469,800 



ADVERTISER 



51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
50. 
00. 
61. 
62. 
03. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 
94. 
95. 
96. 
07. 
98. 
99. 
100. 



Ralston-Purina 

Marathon Corp. 

Reader's Digest . 

Anheuser-Busch 

Wesson Oil & Snow Drift 

Florida Citrus 

Standard Oil of Ind. 

I nited Fruit ... 

Heinz 

Wriglej 

RCA 

Bristol-Mvers 

Sunshine Biscuit 

Ma\ belline 

M. J. B. Co. .. 

Sardeau 

Robert Curley 

Socony Mobil Oil .. 
National Dair\ 

Clorox 

Buitoni ... 

Pillsbury Mills 

Pabst . 

Falstaff 

E. F. Drew 

Frontier Foods 



Sinclair Refining 
American Bakeries _._ 

Quaker Oats 

L. S. Borax 

Grocery Store Prods. 
Pharmaceuticals 

Drackett 

Hills Bros. .. 
Pfizer _ 

Standard Brands 
Piel Bros. 

Bon Ami 

Best Foods - 
\\ ildroot . 

Carnation 

Schaefer 

Milner Products _ 

Petri W ine 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. ... 
YA aid Baking 
Monarch Y\ ine .. 
General Mills 
Mars 
Bun;ermeister 



1ST QUARTER 
1956 


1ST QUARTER 
1957 


S 140.KMI 


$ 464,200 




437,100 


378.900 


428,600 


325.KKI 


425,200 


346.000 


422.800 


698.500 


421 000 


230.2(Hi 


412,800 




412 000 


327.300 


403,100 


107.300 


400,200 


344.000 


399,300 


384.800 


387,700 


203.100 


386,900 




382,800 


116.5()(i 


381,600 


135.300 


380,800 




379,400 


227.400 


369,400 




368,200 




359,000 


135.800 


356,100 


158,300 


353,900 


313.500 


352,300 


377.300 


345,400 




340,700 




339,000 




336,600 


190.500 


336,300 




328,900 




321,400 


181.400 


319,900 


267.500 


316,500 


126.600 


314,400 


403.500 


310,700 




304,900 


285.600 


303,400 


394.200 


292,900 




288,700 


349.400 


288,000 


364.800 


282,600 


258,800 


282,000 


213.500 


277,200 




266,800 


1 22.400 


265,700 




260,700 


162.200 


260,200 


171,600 


259,200 


217.500 


256,200 


117.000 


255,400 




254,300 



Regional Telephone Companies air lifted separately and are no longer combined un'l r American Tel .v I ■ 
Source: TvB quarterly estimate of spot tv expenditure (cross) supplied by N. 0. Korabaugh. 






11 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



Spot tv spending by 31 industries during 1956 and first quarter 1957 



pnHMIIIIIl iir :,■"::: iiiniiN!ii!i;'ir,' ■■■■■ 

Product category 


Spending ultimate 
lit quarter '56 


Spending eitimatc 
2nd quarter '56 


Spending eitimate 
3rd quarter '56 


ling ettimale 
■Mh quarter '56 


ng cjlimatt 
lit quarter 57 


\m iculture 


$311 >. 


. .1 M n | 




83H 


$410,000 


Me, beer & w ine 


$8,323,000 


50. ), 


u 




$8,514 000 


Vmusements, entertainment 


si.-.T.iMio 


51 19. 


1174 ' 




$119,000 


Automotive 


?:,,2ii().(H)o 


5.V.50.OO0 


|] 


|4s249,l 


$2,293,000 


Building material, fixtures, paints 


S! !().-,.( HID 


< 1.1 75.0(M) 




1651 


$450,000 
$2,170,000 
$7,234,000 


Clothing & accessories 


SI. 7)3,000 


S2.22 1.D00 


$1,861 




Conltvtinns & soft drink- 


S 1.073.000 


>5.322. 


< 1.020.000 


96] 


Consumer >er\ ices 


82,952,000 


$3,126,000 


$2,494,000 


- 


$3,177,000 
$10,660,000 

$1,536,000 

$12,981,000 

$32,860,000 

$190,000 


Cosmetics & toiletries 


$7,442,000 


$9,5 H. 000 


$8,950,000 


18 


Dental products 


$4,253,000 


-1.112. 


52.7 12.oi hi 


$1,765, 


Drug products 


$10,726,000 


?f, U.J5.000 


55.29.5.0OO 


$9,537,000 


Food & grocery products 


>2::.ioi. 


S2!!.3!J 1.000 


521.775. 


128,99 


Garden supplies & equipment 


-I SJ.000 


S1JJ7. 1 


s:,::.omi 


$54, 


Gasoline & lubricants 


$3,123,000 


$4,206,000 


s.vio;:.(M)o 


$4,793,000 


$5,422,000 


Hotels, resorts, restaurants 


-i: :.ni hi 


500.000 


573.000 


|70,! 


$87,000 


Household cleaner-, polishes, waxes 


$1,579,000 


52.3ol.ooo 


v V >2.i ii M i 


$2, 191, 


S2, 808, 000 
$1,472,000 
$1,380,000 


Household appliances 


$1,505,000 


$2,430,000 


$1,446,000 


S2.354.000 


Household furnishings 


>7(.;;.nito 


-T.li.oon 


N'l'KI.IMMI 


SI. 182.' 


Household laundry products 


$4,747,000 


$5,242,000 


$3,284,000 


- 1,013,000 


$3,732,000 


Household paper products 


51.kkj.imio 


5 1.502.000 


$1,016,000 


$1,703,1 


$1,618,000 


Household general 


S075.000 


5 1.002.000 


$511,000 


$497 


$592,000 
S30.000 


Notions 


SJIO.IIIMI 


$98,000 


-102. 


$116, 


Pet products 


$986,000 


SI. 174.000 


$&19,000 


$1,649,000 


SI, 679, 000 


Publications 


5.5oJ.OOl) 


il.".;.nnn 


$484,000 


$135 


$553,000 


Sporting goods, bicycle-. tov- 


$98,000 


5102.000 


$79,000 


$1,161 


S115,000 


Stationery, office equipment 


573.0011 


551.000 


- 


- 


$131,000 

$423 000 

$10,331,000 

S884,000 

$1,249,000 


I\. radio, phono., musical inst's 


>(,LV< ion 


$554,000 


-:i;:. 




Tobacco product- >\ supplies 


$7,081,000 


$7,371,000 


>7.: - 


- 115,000 


Transportation & travel 


-.(,..-,.( mo 


5; ;•»:;. 


.512., ..... 


1 


batches, jewelry, cameras 


$1,834,000 


$1,982,000 


$1.637. 


$1,6] 1,1 


Miscellaneous 


11,040,000 


$1,444,000 ' 


-;:;:]. 


- 1 ,218,1 M IM 


SI, 835, 000 


TOTAL 


$100,209,000 


$105,584,000 


$83,863,000 


$107,842,000 


SI 16,935,000 



SPONSOR 



25 may 195' 



1". 



The BIG NEWS in Boston! 



Radio Boston 



fastest rising ra 
station in Bosto 




Boston Metropolitan 
Area Pulse 

• January-February 1957 .... Second Place 

and Still Rising! 

• November-December 1956 . . Second Place 

• September-October 1955 Third Place 

• July-August 1955 Fourth Place 

• May-June 1955 Fifth Place 

Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc. Stations: 

Radio Baltimore I Radio Chicago I Radio Memphis 
WCAO WJJD WMPS 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 



46 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



RADIO BASICS /may 



Hiia is the firsl ol sponsor's new Radio Basics section, It 
will appeal everj foui weeks and will complement and alt< rn iti 
with l\ Basics, rhree sections make up Radio Basics. Hie 
firsl i- .1 series ol four indices, giving material, updated ever) 
I. 'in weeks foi the mosl part, on numbei ol homes, Btations, 
Bets in homes and sets Bold <>i produced. The second sec- 
tion covers -|>"i and will provide periodic indices of local 
listening in various markets and research material of interest 
to users "I spot. Hie third, or network, section will emphasize 
web radio's clients but will also include other material of inter- 
est I" network users. \ complete list of network radio clients 
will appear as a supplement to Radio Basics in the next issue 
and t lut ia I h i will be included as a regulai feature. Sugges- 
tions from readers as i<> content and formal will be wel- 
comed and used as basis for future additions and revisions, 
rhe next Radio Basics will appear in the 22 June issue. 



o dimensions ax- indexed 
■ in tei ms of homes, Btations 
in homes, sets sold , . . »cc below 

, "-|">i basii - prov ides kx a] 
'■ kel listening index, audiem e 
composition facts . . . pogc 48 

Net* oi k basi< - show - bu 
, m the month, radio listening l>\ 

hoUl 9 and t < . j . -Ii'.u- . . . pogc 50 



llllllllllllllll 



1. RADIO'S DIMENSIONS TODAY 



Radio homes index 



1957 



47.7 
radio 
homes 



1956 




47.0 
radio 
homes 



49.5 48.7 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

figures In mi 



Radio station index 



End of \|»ril 1957 





Stations 


CPs not 


Applications 


Applications 




on lif 


on air 


on hand 


in hearing 


Am 


1 3049 1 


154 


1 


112- 


Fm 


1 1 


■ > 


1 







End 


ol Ipril 


l <>.><> 




Am 


1 mi 1 


118 


1 


101 


Fm 


1 1 


1 : 


1 





Source: 









Radio set index 



Radio sales index 



Set 
location 



Home 

\nto 

Public 
places 



1957 


1956 




81.1)1111.00(1 
34,000,000 

10,000,000* 


82,000,000 
12,000,000 

10,000,000 




128.00O.IIIIO 


ilm.ooo.ooo 





Total 



BAB 1 January each year, estimates 
■ king order. 'No new information. 



Type 



Home 
\ hi ■ » 



Total 



March 1957 March 1956 

730,584 7,649 

597,532 519 

1,328,116 



First Quarter First Quarter 
1957 1956 



1,818,976 
1,642,015 

3,460,991 



= Source KKTM \ II .-.■ retail «ale*. aum fi«u" -■ ja)e». 



sponsor • 25 mat L957 



17 



2. SPOT RADIO BASICS 



Spot listening 
market index 

Figures for the 10 markets 
at right show homes using 
radio I in and out of home i 
during the March-April pe- 
riod 1957. Data comes 
from Pulse, covering listen- 
ing during the average 
quarter hour of each three- 
hour day part. Spot Radio 
Basics will periodically cov- 
er different groups of mar- 
kets with the same type of 
break-downs as shown here 



IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

How local markets compare in listening levels by three-hour day parts 



1 Market 


6-9 a.m. 


9 a.m.-N 


N-3 p.m. 


3-6 p.m. 


6-9 p.m. 


9 p.m.-M 


m 


Atlanta 


25.4 


27.3 


26.4 


26.9 


21.3 


14.5 




1 Baltimore 


23.3 


25.4 


25.2 


26.7 


19.3 


16.5 




I Boston 


23.6 


28.8 


27.2 


28.2 


21.4 


15.0 


= 


1 Chicago 


27.3 


31.4 


29.8 


29.6 


21.3 


14.2 


= 


1 Los Angeles 


23.7 


31.0 


27.8 


28.6 


22.3 


15.4 


| Pittsburgh 


22.1 


27.7 


26.5 


28.5 


20.6 


14.3 


I Portland. Ore. 


28.5 


30.8 


28.9 


29.9 


22.7 


16.4 


Richmond 


21.4 


25.0 


23.8 


25.4 


18.4 


12.7 


I San Francisco 


26.6 


30.8 


25.4 


28.4 


22.3 


17.7 


! Washington, D.C. 


25.5 


29.2 


26.9 


28.4 


22.7 


15.1 


i 



ili;!illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllll!llllll!llllllll!l!llllllll 



llllllillllllllliil 



illllllll!!' 



Does a station's cost-per-1,000 vary much during the day? 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiin 



l— S 2.60 



-$2.00 



-$1.00 







H0URI 


Y COST 


PER THl 


USAND ( 


6 AM- 6 


PM) 








i 






















\ 

• 

\ 

• 

• 
• 
• 


• — M ■ 







i ^— ■ ^ 


• 
• 


• 

• 

• 

• 




m a ■■■* ■ 





• 

Z 


• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 










■•■••■•■ 









\. 


X 


w 




■ 


















































6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11 

Illlllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllll 

The chart above shows the cost-per-1,000 homes reached 
for four stations in a typical, medium-sized Midwest market 
1>\ hours of the daj during the day. As the figures indicate, 
there can be a considerable variation in cost-per-1,000. The 
figures also show that earl\ morning and late afternoon 



11 -N 



N-l 



1-2 



2-3 



3-4 



4-5 



5-6 






milium 



prime time are not always the best buy. though if the figures 
were calculated in terms of cost-per-1.000 men reached the 
picture would be different. Data is based on NCS #2 with 
recent Pulse ratings projected via the SRA formula. The 
chart and cost-per-1,000 were prepared by The Katz Agent •> . 



i:; 



SPONSOR • 



25 MA'S 195*3 









TIME 



6-7 a.m. 
7-8 
8 9 
9-10 
10-11 



11-N 



N-l p.m. 
1-2 
2-3 
3-4 



4-5 



5-6 



6-7 



7-8 



8-9 



9-10 

10-11 



11-M 



\\ eekend 

MEN 



audience composition <»n the local level 

WOMEN TEENS CHILDREN SETS IN USI 



1" 


i::-. 


L". 




5.1 


1 i 


I 1 ' 


1 


2 


11.3 


39 


13 


". 


3 


15.7 


16 




:: 


I 


16.9 


;i 


"._' 


10 


4 


19.3 


;i 


52 


10 


1 


20.1 


36 


50 


LO 


1 


20.6 


in 


16 


in 


1 


21.4 


II 


15 


10 


1 


23.1 


12 


45 


10 


3 


23.4 


K) 


16 


111 


1 


23.1 


in 


47 


10 


3 


21.3 


II 


47 


o 


3 


21.2 


i; 

1 1 


16 


8 


3 


18.9 


16 


8 


2 


18.1 


15 


r. 


8 


2 


16.9 


17 


46 


6 


1 


14.7 


til 

n 


47 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


5 

IIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 




11.0 



Winter audience 
data in 8 markets 

< ban .ii left, prepared l>\ John 
Blah .hkI < ii.. pro\ idea .i four-waj 
audien( e i omposition breakdow n, 
baaed on Pulse data Ln the follow- 
ing eight marketa: < bii ago, De« 
ii'ni. Philadelphia, ( olumbus, Mi- 
ami. Pittsburgh, Seattle, Dallas. 
I igures show .i weighted a\ i i 
■ n\ ii In. ih Saturdaj .mil Sunday . 
Note the substantia] numbers ol 
men who can be rea< bed during 
the da) on weekends. Data >\\<>w n 
includes Listeninc Ln automobiles 



111 1 I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi: liiiil '.: 



Combination buys 
on local level 

taken From NSI special analysis 
files, the data at righl give some 
idea of tlic audience sizes an ad- 
vertiser can accumulate with 
combination Inns. The first har 
is a morning strip combined with 
an afternoon strip. The second is 
a daytime strip combined with an 
earK evening strip. Material is 
not meant as a comparison of the 
three different t\pes of purchases 



Schedule 



Homes 
reached 
per 
month 



Homes reached 
per broadcast 

Broadcasts received 
per home reached 



Two .">-;<-« k 
-trip- on one 

station ( 10 

»ll(l»N ) 



26% 



5.4 



Two .")-.!-« k 

•trips on two 

stations | in 
shows ) 

30% 




5.3 



"•put schedoJc 
on »i\ sta- 
tions ( ~2 .Ml- 
nun in i in. ii l- i 



23% 




1% 



2.2 



SPONSOR • 27> MAY 1957 



19 



3. NETWORK RADIO BASICS 



(anient methods of bu\ i n«i network radio — the scattered program and announce- 
ment bins and the in-and-out habits of clients — make it difficult for admen to keep 
track of what's going on. The list below shows the important bins that were made 
during the past month. It includes facts already printed in New and Renew 
but with more detail. See the next issue for web radio's full client list 



FABULOUS FORD BUY IS MONTH'S HIGHLIGHT 



lllllllllllliiiliiilllllllliiilililiilliilllililliiillillillliillllllllli ABC nil minimi mm mum i miiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Ball Bros.: Four segments of Breakfast Club were boughl 
b\ the sponsor, starting 21 May. Business was placed by 
Applegate Advertising \genc\. Muneie. for fruit jars, caps, 
jell) glasses, jar rubbers. 

d-Con Co.: Two segments a week of My True Story is 
being sponsored by this division of Sterling Drug for in- 
secticides. The campaign began 14 May. 
Ceneral Foods: Nine new segments, bought for summer 
airing, were added to GF's 14 segments already on ABC's 
morning block. The nine, bought via Y&R for Jell-0 In- 
stant Pudding, including three on Breakfast Club, two on 
My True Story, two on When a Girl Marries and two on 
Whispering Streets. 

Texas Co.: The oil firm renewed its sponsorship of the 
Saturday afternoon Metropolitan Opera broadcasts for 1957- 
58, its IJJth consecutive season via C&W. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini! CBS iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Chesebrough-Pond's: Five minutes of Sports Time, 7:00- 
7:05 p.m. three times a week for 13 weeks was bought for 
Valcream through Compton. Kickoff is 17 June. 
Dixie Cup: A five-minute segment on Robert Q. Lewis' 
show Saturday mornings will plug Dixie Cups in the home 
for 26 weeks. Campaign began 18 May. 
Ford: The biggest network buy in recent years was Ford's 
four hours and 40 minutes weekly news-and-music package 
on CBS for 52 weeks starting 2 September. Aimed at motor- 
ists, the buy covers five minutes of news and five minutes of 
Rosemary Clooney and Bing Crosby across-the-board on 
weekdays during the period between 7:00-8:05 a.m. local 
time: an Arthur Godfrey weekday strip from 5:05 to 5:30 
p.m.; the Ed Murrow strip. 7:45-8:00 p.m.; six Clooney- 
Crosby five-minute shows at 5:00 and 5:55 p.m. Saturday 
and 12:55, 2:30, 4:30 and 5:55 p.m. Sunday. Agenc\ : JWT. 
The cost: s 1.2 million after time discounts. 
Gillette: Three horse races in May and June were bought 
for all Gillette products via Maxon. The) included the 
Kentucky Derby on 4 Ma\ . the Preakness on 18 May and 
Belmont on 15 June. 

Kendall Co.: Minor summertime injuries are the motive 
behind the buy of a dozen 15-minute segments of Arthur 
Godfrey's morning show for Curads and Curity first aid 
products. Leo Burnett bought the 10:45-11:00 segment for 
28 June and 30 August and the Thursday 10:30-10:45 seg- 
ment for 10 weeks beginning 4 July. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii NBC 

American Dairy: NBC's run-of-schedule 20-10 Plan (10 
one-minute and 10 30-second announcements during the 
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. period I was bought b\ the client 
for 13 weeks starting 3 June through Campbell-Mithun. 
American Dairy is the second user of the 20-10 Plan. 
California Packing: A $500,000 buy involving one-quarter 
of News on the Hour for 20 weeks started 20 May. Empha- 
sis will be on Del Monte's pineapple-grapefruit juice. The 
bin. via McCann-Erickson. covers an average of 42 1 L > an- 
nouncements per week, half minutes and half 30-seconds. 
Columbia Pictures: A total of 33 minute announcements 
for three weeks starting 21 June will plug Fire Down Below. 
Programs bought into include Bandstand. People Are Funny 
and Monitor. The agency is Donahue & Coe. 
Ex Lax: Four announcements weekly have been added to 
16 Ex Lax already has on NBC. The new buy. via Warwick 
and Legler, involves one participation per week for 34 
weeks in Great Gildersleeve, People Are Funny. One Mans 
Family and Monitor. 

Ceneral Foods: Campaigns for Jell-0 and Postum have 
been placed. The Jell-0 drive is a reminder campaign with 
60 six-second announcements per week for 10 Aveeks on 
Bandstand and Truth or Consequences. Estimated cost to 
GF is $120,000. Postum will be represented by one partici- 
pation a day five da\s a week on Bandstand and Pepper 
Young's Family for 26 weeks. 

Ceneral Mills: Five one-minute and five 30-second an- 
nouncements per weekend for 52 weeks were purchased in 
the Fibber McGee and Bob and Ray segments of Monitor. 
Campaign, via DFS, will start 1 June. Brand and brand 
schedules had not been decided at presstime. 
Mack Mfg.: Trucks will be advertised on Monitor with six 
one-minute announcements per week for 10 weeks starting 
28 June. Doyle, Kitchen & McCormick placed the business. 
Plough Chemical: A 13-week campaign for St. Joseph's 
aspirin will start on Monitor 1 June. The $110,000 buy 
provides for 10 one-minute and 10 30-second plugs. 
Sleep- Eze: \ 13-week summer drive will employ one par- 
ticipation a week on People Are Funny and two a week on 
One Man's Family. Agency is Milton Carlson. Los Angeles. 
20th Century-Fox: \ two-weekend saturation drive on 
Monitor will be used to plug Bemadine. Schedule provides 
for 50 six-second announcements per weekend. Dates are 
22 and 20 June. 



50 



SPONSOR 



25 m\y 1957 



I . §■ homea reached pet average minutes \>\ hours <>i da] 



AFTERNOON 




Radio's audience as "I Januarj 195*3 (Nielsen) is shown Werage minute audiences are onl) .1 fraction 01 radios 
above. Figures atop bars represent millions of homes. total in-home audience (aboul 30 million homes per day) 

Network radio in-home audiences: top shows and average 



DAYTIME 



EVENING 



Weekday 

Average for all programs 

1 Ma Perking (2nd balf) Lipton M-F Wk 2 

2 Ma Perkins (2nd half) Scott 

Tue. & Wed. Wk 1 

3 \. Godfrey 1 Isl half) 1 hun King 

10:00 a.m. Tue. Wk 2 

4 Young Dr. Malone (2nd half) Lever M-F 

5 Ma Perkins I 1-t half) Lever M-F 

6 House Partj Simoniz 3:15 p.m. Wed. 

7 \. Godfrej l.n'l Min. S Chem. 

10:15 a.m. Th. Wk _' 

8 Helen Trent (2nd hafl) Scotl Mon. & Th. 

9 Nora Drake (2nd half) Scott Tue. S Th. 
10 House Partj Stale] 3:15 p.m. Tue, 



HOMES 
l OOO I 

1,097 
1,765 

1,765 

1,670 
1,622 
1,622 
1,622 

1,622 
1,622 
1,622 
1,574 



Average for all programs 

1 rack !'>• run 

2 Gunsmoke Sun. 6 10 p.m. 

3 • >ur Miss ltr<"'k- ' 

4 < rur M i-- Brooks I •■rillanl 

5 < runsmoke San. '>: k"> p.m. 

6 Mitch Miller 8:10 p.m. 

7 l< adi !in V wards 

8 Mu b Miller 8:20 p.m. 

9 50th Vnniversarj Musical 
10 Sports Sun. B: 15 p.m. 



HOMES 

i OOO I 

525 

1,670 

1,383 

1,336 

1,240 

1,193 

1,409 

1,002 

906 

906 

811 



Sunday 

Average for all programs 

1 Woolworth Hour 

2 Robert Troul 

3 Johnnj Dollar Lorillard 

Saturday 

Average for all programs 

1 Gunsmoke — 12:30 p.m. 

2 Gunsmoke 12: (5 pan. 

3 Sports 12:55 p.m. 



429 
1,193 
1,145 
1,002 



620 
1,574 
1,479 

1,288 



Multi-weekly 

Average for all programs 

1 Lowell Thomas 

2 News ol the World 

3 i tai Man's I imil) 



668 
1,288 
1 240 
1.145 



Program audience figures are hron Nielsen's first \pril 
report covering the two week- ending 6 Vpril 1957. D 
i» based on homes listening t" .1 program -i\ minutes 
more, except for programs "t 15 minutes or less in which 
case homes listening one minute >>r mere are included. 



SPONSOR 



25 m\v 1957 



51 



SPONSOR ASKS 




What are your tips on how to hire tv and radio personnel m 




Richard Bacharach, director, entertain- 
merit division, Jules Z. Willing Organization, 

New York 
The entertainment industry has grown 
to such huge proportions in recent 
years (hat its traditional methods of 
filling top executive spots is hopelessly 
out-dated and inefficient It is the onlj 
major American industry in which key 
job* are filled 1>\ word-of-mouth, and 
by planned "leaks" signifying that an 



"adopt a 
more effective 
method" 



important top-level change is in the 
making. 

Considering the enormous invest- 
ment costs in television, motion pic- 
tures, and the legitimate theatre, the 
entertainment industry is being forced 
by shrinking profit margins to adopt a 
more effective method of finding the 
right man for the important job. 

American industry has long since 
found that answer in the confidential 
executive recruiting firm such as our 
own. where the entire field is scouted, 
sifted, and screened until a small hand- 
ful of well-qualified men (whose 
availability is a secret even to their 
closest friends and associates ) consti- 
tute the field from which the best can- 
didate is finally chosen. This is the 
method the entertainment industrj 
must learn to use. 

The top entertainment executive is 
a very insecure person job-wise, sub- 
ject to incredible tensions, and the 
victim of a very high rate of job mor- 
tality. He tries to keep plugged into 
the grapevine, to learn what jobs are 
available and what qualifications are 
expected; but his information is usual- 
ly hazy, inaccurate, and incomplete. 
Even when he has a clear and correct 



version of an inviting possibility, he is 
not often in a position to make his 
availabilit) or interest known, except 
by dropping a casual hint at the right 
luncheon table. 

For his sake, too, the confidential 
intermediary is essential — both for his 
success and for his peace of mind. 
The extent to which our work in per- 
forming this intermediary function for 
both the employer and employee has 
captured the imagination of both, the 
eagerness with which both have been 
willing to talk to us confidentially 
about what they are looking for. and 
the startlingly effective results that we 
have been able to obtain in a compara- 
tively short period of time, all seem to 
indicate that we are on the right track 
in finding an effective way to get the 
right top man and the right top job 
together, to the enormous advantage of 
both. 

Roger Pryor, vice president of radio and 
television, Foote, Cone & Belding, New York 
As a first step in hiring a new broad- 
cast boy, I believe it makes sense to de- 
cide just how much youre going to be 
able to pay him. Not how little, but 
how much. Take a good look at your 
budget before looking any place else, 
and remember that unlike merchan- 
dise, a "sale" on ability is rarely to be 
found. With people, as with anything 
else, you usually get what you pay for, 
so make up your mind not to drive too 
sharp a bargain. To be sure, you'd 
like to get a little more than you pay 
for and probably will if \ou have an 
attractive job to offer, but don"t trv to 
get something for nothing, for where 
people are concerned it usuallv works 
in reverse. 

Having set your top figure, you'll 
have little trouble narrowing the list 
of applicants to those who fit reason- 
ably into such a category. And with 
this done, it seems to me that the one 
who best answers the following ques- 
tions will probably get the job: 



1. In addition to television, does he 
have an adequate radio background? 

2. Assuming broad experience in 
both media, were these years spent as 
an agency representative, or was he 
employed by a station or package pro- 
ducer, or what? 

3. Has he specialized in direction? 
Production? Writing? Or is his back- 
ground sufficiently comprehensive to 
include all of these activities? 

4. How many years of agencv ex- 
perience has he had, and what is the 
length of his tenure with each agency? 

5. Is he sufficiently mature to be 
"left alone"? Can his judgment be 
depended upon? It seems to me that 
this can't be over-emphasized. 

6. Is he good at detail work? The 
complexity of broadcast operations to- 
day demands a "buttoned-up"" type of 
lad. 

7. Is he articulate and does he han- 
dle himself well in groups? 

8. Is his personal appearance satis- 
factory? Remember, that just as a per- 
son is known by the company he keeps, 
so is the agency known by the com- 
pany it hires. 

9. Of course you will want to satisfy 
yourself as to his sobriety, reliability , 



"don't try to 
get something 
for nothing" 



etc., and if by now he shapes up pret- 
t\ good, there's one really loaded ques- 
tion you'll want to ask him: Is he will- 
ing to burn the midnight oil at both 
ends? Will he be perfectly delighted 
to get stuck in a control room covering 
a commercial in the Late Late Show 
on Christmas Eve? Is his wife the 
kind who'll laugh good naturedly when 
he calls at 8:00 p.m. and says, "Dear, 1 




i2 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 




know we've ""t eighl l"i dinner, 1ml 
I'm -till at the studio, "> "ii see, the 
clienl hasn'l ai i ived j et. II*- called .1 
couple ol hours ago and said he'd be 
.1 Few minutes late, etc., et< ., etc.'? 

If he takes all these questions in his 
sti ide, hire him brothei ! ! \ml. it \ ou 
i .in linil anj others let me know ' 

Ruth E. Bachman, advert alist, 

Bing-l ronin, \ eu ) ork 
Mm . . . don l be sold . . ■ bo, know 
w h.it you need. It's the alerl executive 
who knows what's needed from the 
simple definitive t<> the creative, illu- 
sive requirements. I In ■ executive who 
ju-i needs "someone' on bis Btaff, maj 
v ell be sold a Mil "I goods l»\ a phon) . 



"a phony is 
sometimes a 
good salesman" 



\ phon) is sometimes a verj g I 

salesman, he's verj interested in him- 
self and tlic less he has to clutter his 
mind with other knowledge, the better 
In- can concentrate on and talk ahoul 
how uimkI he is. 

\\ hen you want to bu) time . . . you 
shop. Spot? Participation? Showy 
Local.'' Network? Owned & operated? 
\\ hat will sell your product l>est? And 
M you ask for an estimate. Just as 
you bu) time to sell a product, you 
l>u\ people who will produce. Produce 
what? If you know exactl) what. 
you're off to a good start. Otherwise, 
get out your pencil and think with it. 
on paper : 

Functional job title: department of 
the company; list of all duties to be 
performed: other factors important to 
the job — special education, special 
skills or talents, kind of personality. 

Too often, though, the harassed ex- 
ecutive, pressed for time, oversimplifies 
this step. He wants a man with the 
same highly specialized experience — 
but not one even minor fault of — the 
newly departed employee. This lack of 
imaginative appraisal leads quickl) to 
inbred hiring which results in Btatic 
-tailing. Estimate your need-, evaluate 
your candidate and hire creatively ! 

Hire quality. That's m) tip. V given 
individual with quality of intelligence 
and personality plus certain demon- 
strated talents and abilities does not 
1 Please turn page 1 



i 



^ DONT BEE 





There's only ONE Skowhegan . . . 
. . . it's in MAINE 
Moppets and mothers here, as 
elsewhere, are devoted to 
ROMPER ROOM on Channel Six 

Quoting Marge Pressey, in hei weekl) Somerset Reporter column. 
Diary of a Skowhegan Mothei ol Six: 

"In iu\ opinion, one ol the verj besl programs on IV for 
pre-school children these days is Romper Room on Channel 6 
at '.»:.'!() a.m. Miss Connie, Rompei Rooms 'teacher', is such an 
attractive person and has such a lovely personality, the children 
just adore her." 

What do Romper Room sponsors say? 
MAINE SAVINGS BANK— "We have found Rompei Room 
successful in soliciting new accounts among the youngei 1 tips 

and their parents." 

OAKHURST DAIRY — "A quality presentation combining child 
development and entertainment values with unique sales-servia 
appeal." 

KIDDYLAND — "Romper Room is excellent as a vehicle ol !><>ih 
educational influence and entertainment. It has brought many 
new customers to us." 

We sa\ : "Sec your nearest Weed TV man E01 summei avail 

abilities." 



WCSH-TV 



PORTLAND, 
MAINE 



SPONsxi; 



2i MAI lTi, 



53 



need highb -]t('(ial ized experience to 

do a creative, productive job. I here 
i- no such thing as a creative hack. 

Joan Sinclaire, " packager and former 
n manager for Lowen Placement 1m<'I" ) 
First, knou what you're looking for — 
have very definite qualifications and 
- pec i fie duties clearl) in mind and then 
he flexible enough in your thinking 
to recognize talent potential when il 
walks in your door! 

\\ ht'ii you interview a prospect, have 
enough imagination and crealivit\ to 
envision him in the job — evaluate his 



a i c .perence along with his future 
potential. Ask yourself if this is the 
type of man or woman who will grow 
with your organization or stand still 
and stagnate? 

One of the main troubles with some 
employers is that the) change the 
specifications for the job with each 
applicant the) interview. For example, 
thej call you up and ask for a top 
radio t\ commercial writer with film 
experience and then after they've seen 
three top men who are ideally suited 
for the position, according to the orig- 
inal specifications, they do an about 





face and decide the\ want a good gen- 
eral copywriter with a knowledge of 
print and timebuying. . . . How con- 
fused can you be? 

I nt i J an employer actually knows 
what he wants and needs, he shouldn't 
do any interviewing. I he pre-selection 
service which a good personnel agency 
offers is completely wasted when the 
client doesn't know what he reallv 



"level i< itli 
him about 
the job" 



wants. Further, the employer wastes 
his own time and energy as well as 
that of the prospective employee whose 
morale goes way down when he is told 
he is completely wrong for the job 
simply because the employer doesn't 
know his own mind. 

Above all — be sincere . . . and look 
for sincerity in your employees. Sin- 
cerity succeeds ver\ often where geni- 
us and talent fail ! 

Be yourself! These are the key 
words — the recipe for success in busi- 
ness and professional life — in inter- 
viewing — in helping you find out what 
makes a man or woman tick. If you 
want to find out what kind of an 
employee you'll be getting for }our 
money then "level with him — abouv 
the job, its potential and his future if 
he casts his lot with you. 

Remember, that the average man 
who is out of work, or interested in 
making a change, is apt to be nervous 
and ill at ease when he comes in for an 
interview. By being yourself you can 
make it easy for him to be himself, 
therefore you find out more readib 
about the man and his aptitudes and 
abilities. 

Avoid hiring a person who talks too 
much about himself — let the record as 
indicated on his resume and in his 
portfolio and credits, speak for itself. 
And remember thai humility and 
teachableness are important qualities 
in an employee. 

Above all. avoid hiring a man who 
won't listen when you talk. \n\one 
who thinks he knows all the answers 
before he starts working for \ou is a 
dangerous character to have around! 
He ma\ not end up getting your job — 
but he ma\ just walk out and take 
vour best account with him! ! ! t^ 



:»i 



SPONSOR 



25 mai L957 







NEW AND RE 



i.l\ listing "i 1 1,,, 
in the advertising and broada 



NEW ON RADIO NETWORKS 



SPONSOR 

Fflgidalri Dcv CM, O.iyton 
I lira Oiv CM. Dayton 

Ccncral Foods. White Plains NY 

Ccncral Foods, White Pl.nnv NY 

Ccncrjl Foods. White Plains. NY 

Cencr.il Foods. White Plains. NY 

Ccncral Foods. White Plains. NY 

Ccncral Foods. White Plains. NY 

General Foods. White Plains. NY 

General Foods. White Plains. NY 

Cenc.-al Foods. White Plains NY 

Plough Inc. Memphis 

Shulton. NY 

20th Ccntu.-y Fox Film Corp. NY 

Vcrnell's Butter Mints, Seattle 



ACLNCY 

Kudner NY 
Kudncr, NY 

Y&R NY 

Y&R. NY 
Y&R NY 
Y&R. NY 

Y&R. NY 

Y&R, NY 

Y&R NY 

Y&R, NY 

Y&R. NY 

Lake-Spro-Shurman, Memphis NBC 158 

Wesley. NY CBS 201 

Charles Schlaifer. NY h BC 158 

Ma tin & Tuttle. Seattle CBS 201 



STATIONS 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


CBS 


201 


■vBC 


151 


NBC 


151 



PROGRAM, time, itort, duration 

C.ilcn Dr.ikc Sj 10 05-10 50 im; 5 mm sen. 18. 25 May only 
Robert Q Lewis. Sa II 05-12 n. 5 mm Mg; 18 25 May only 
World New, Roundui; Su 9-9 15 am 5 mm s< K 12 May, 

26 wks 
Cunsmokc, Su 6:30-655 pm; 5 mm Mg; 12 May 26 wki 
Cir Miss Books; Su 7 30-8 prr , 5 mm sc* 12 May 26 wks 
'^mos n Andy Mjsic Hall M F 7 05-7 45 pm 5 mm v<* 

13 May; 26 wks 

Sa 1005-1050 am. 5 mm Mg; 18 May 26 wks 
Robert Q. Lewis: 3a 11:05-12 n 5 mm u; 18 May 26 wks 
Cunsmokc. Sa 12 30-1255 pm; 5 mm seg 18 May 26 wks 
3 indsMnd M-F 10:30-12 n; 30 parties p> r wk I July 10 wks 
Truth or Consequences: M-F 10 05-10:30 am; 30 parties per 

wk 1 July: 10 wks 
loniior; 29 parties per wkend; 25 May; 52 wks 

thur Codfrcy Time. F 10 15-10:30 am. M |ur 
Monitor; 50 parties per wkend: 22 June 2 wks 
''obe.t Q Lewis; Sa 11 05-12 n; 5 mm scg ; 11 May 52 wks 



BROADCAST INDUSTRY EXECUTIVES 



NAME 



Tom Boise 
Charles W. Brunt 
Stan Byrnes 
C. Herbert Clarke 



George R. Collisson 
Byington F. Colvig 
Robert V. Evans 



Philip Fcldman 
Armand Grant 
Be.-nct C. Hammcl 
Robert I Holt 
Bill Karl 



Helen Irene Koss 
Robert G, McKec 
Walter K. Neill 
Bill Oldham 
Barrie D. Richardson 
C. S. Shulda 

Hugh M. Simpson 

Austen Smithers 
Dale Stevens 
Fred Urscl 



Arthur Vigeland 
Raymond W. Welpott 
Alycc Wilson 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

KSFD. San Diego, mgr 

WTOB. Winston-Salem, sis mgr 

Pathc Pictucs. NY. sis mgr 

NBC Tv Net. NY. stn sis rep-sis traffic dept 

WKY-TV. Oklahoma City, sis 

CBS Tv Spot Sales. Chi, dir sis promotion 

Cbs Legal Dept. NY. senior atty 

CBS Tv. Hy. dir bus.ness affairs 
_WKIT. Garden City. LI. vp & gen mgr 

Schwerin Research. NY. asst dir operations 
.Fanchon & Marco, advtng mgr 

KERC Eugene. Ore, sis 

American Research Bureau. NY, exec sec 

NBC Radio & Tv Nets. Chi, acct exec-midwest sis 
.Dir own advtng & public relations agcy. LA 
.Edward Petry. Chi radio acct exec 
.Warner Bros. NY. publicity 
_KERG. Eugene. Ore. local sis mgr 

WALA-TV. Mobile, acct exec 

Hcadlcy-Reed. NY. radio sis mgr 



.CKSL. London Ontario, sis 
.Ted Bates. NY. acct exc: 
WRCB. Schenectady, s.'n mgr 
.Free-lancing on r-tv commc.cials Fh.la 



NEW AFFILIATION 

John Blair, LA. acct exc: 

Same, mgr 

Tclcvis.on PoRrams of America, acct exec 

Same, mgr stn sis 

KTOK. Oklahoma City, sis mgr 

Same, acct exec 

CBS Tv. NY. asst gen atty chg talent, pro & facilities con- 

iracls and righ"j 
Same, vp & business mgr-talent & contract properties 
ABC Tv NY exec producer-daytime programs 
ABC Tv Net. NY. asst mgr research 
Cross-K.-asne Hy dir advtng & promotion 
Same, local sis mgr 
Same, admin asst 

ABC Chi acct exec tv sis — cent div 
Television Programs of America. Detroit, acct 
Same St Louis, sis mgr 
CBS Radio. NY. p.css information 
Same, natl sis mgr 

Television Programs of America New Orleans acct ■ ■ 
Edward Petry. NY acct exec — radio div 
E\e ett-McKmncy. Chi sis 
Same, retail sis mgr 
John Blair NY acct exec 
WKY WKY TV Oklahoma City stn mgr 
WALA-TV. Mobile, sis 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

William A. Baumert 
Edwin J. Benedict 
James Benham 
Carl Cannon 



Douglass Coady 

Arnold M. Combrinck-Craham 
Jr. 



George W. Davidson 
Michael |. Donovan 
Lawrence H. Douglas 
James P. Dwyer 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

Frank Baumert Co. NY. partner 
|. M. Mathes. NY. acct super 
Young & Rubicam. NY acct exec 
United Nations NY chg visitors services 
Hotpomt. Chi. mk*ng specialist — tv div 

Kenyon & Eckhardt. Chi acct exec 
1 Walter Thompson. NY. mktng exec 
Benton & Bowles. NY. asso media dir 
Cotham Broadcasting. NY. acct exec 
William Jenkins Advtng. Phi lj vp 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Paris & . n ci t NY acct exec 
Ma.sctu k & Pratt. NY. acct exec 
Ted 8a, cs. NY acct super 

K ch. MicLeod & C-ove. NY public relations ace 
- McCl.nton. Chi acct exec 

Same, also vp 

Compton. NY vp & acct super 

Same, also vp 

Thomas & Douglas NY vp 

Cray & Rogers Phila. advtng staff 



SPONSOR 



2i \i u 1 ').-), 



00 




NEW AND RENEW 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES continued 



NAME 

Cay Gibson 
Raymond F. Comber 



Ccorgc Crabin 

Robert A. Crant 

Kent Johnson 

Walter E. Koons 

Shannon Patrick LaFontaine 



FORMER AFFILIATION 

.Doyle Dane Bernbach, NY, copywriter 

Wcstinghouse Electric, Pitts, industrial advtng & sis promo- 
tion mgr 

Arthur Meyerhoff, Milwaukee, mgr 

Crant Advtng Ltd, Tokyo, head 

Lambert & Fcasley, NY, acct exec 

Fuller & Smith & Ross, NY, acct exec 

LaFontaine-Detroit Co, sis promotion 



Marlcn Loehrkc 
John F. McManus 
Marion Meisenheimer 
Robert 0. Memmel 
Walter Henry Nelson 
David A. Neuman 
Louis |. Nicholaus 
William D. Nietfield 
Ted Pearson 
Joseph Pendcrgast 
Christopher A. Sante 
C. Stuart Siebert, Jr. 
Robert F. Stanton 

Melcon Tashian _ 

Earl Timmons 
Lawrence Weitzner 
Robert E. Wiesner 
Phillip Wolf 



Foote, Cone & Belding, Chi, personnel dir 

Zimmer. Keller & Calvert, Detroit, acct exec 

Mathisson & Associates, Milwaukee 

American Lace Paper, advtng & sis promotion mgr 

American Petroleum Institute, editor & public relations 

Emil Mogul, NY, acct exec 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Boston, acct exec 

Crant Advtng, SF, acct exec _ 

.Brisacher Wheeler, SF, asst acct exec _ 

John T. Fosdick Associates, NY, vp 

-Lcnnen & Newell. NY, dir research 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, Chi, acct exec 

Albert Frank-Cuenther Law, NY, acct exec 

Foote, Cone & Belding, NY, art dir _ 

Erwin, Wasey, LA, asst research dir _ 

Emil Mogul, NY, asst production mgr 
Lcnnen & Newell, NY, asst dir media research 
MacManus. John & Adams. LA, producer tv commercials 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, head sis promotion dept 

Compton Advtng, Milwaukee, vp & mgr 

Same, vp 

Robert Otto, NY, acct exec 

Endorsements, Inc. NY, vp chg admin 

Ketchum, MacLeod & Crove, NY, acct exec 

MacManus, John & Adams, Bloomfield Hills, Mich, purchasing 

& production mgr — sis aid section 
Same, also vp 

Marschalk & Pratt, NY, acct exec 

Maercklein Advtng, Milwaukee, dir media & research 
Maercklein Advtng, dir media & research 
Reach, McClinton, NY, public relations mgr 
Peck Advtng, NY, acct exec 
Same, also vp 

Jack Canady & Associates. San Diego, vp 
Foote, Cone Cr Belding. SF. asst media dir 
Paris & Peart, NY, mktng acct exec 
Same, also senior vp 
Same, also vp 

Ketchum, MacLeod & Crove. NY, acct exec 
Same, also vp 

Stromberger, LaVerne, McKenzie, LA, research dir 
Same, asst to exec vp — acct super 
Atherton & Currier, NY, dir research 
Mottl & Sittman. LA, r-tv dir 



SPONSOR PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 

Harry L. Ault 

Andrew C. Britton 
Thomas S. Carroll 
Roger Creene 

Lloyd A. Crobe 

Clifford Kahler _ 
Walter N. McFadden 
R. W. Moore, Sr. 
Roy W. Moore, Jr. __ 
Roland F. Roche 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Chrysler, dealer advtng mgr 

.Philip Morris, Cen factories mgr — Richmond, Louisville 

.Colgate-Palmolive, brand advtng mgr 

.Philip Morris, dir advtng 

Oldsmobile, business management mgr — LA zone 

Pabst Sparkling Beverages, district mgr 

Philip Morris, dir purchasing 

Canada Dry, president _ 

Canada Dry, exec vp & gen mgr 

P. Ballantine & Sons, media dir 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, advting mgr 

Same, vp— manufacturing 

Same, mktng mgr — household products div 

Same, vp — advtng 

Same, advtng mgr 

Same, sis mgr 

Same, vp — purchasing 

.Same, chairman board & chief exec officer 

.Same, president 

Same, gen merch mgr 



STATION CHANGES 



56 



CFCR-TV, Kamloops, British Columbia has joined CBS Tv Net 

KABR, Aberdeen, SD, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KAMQ, Amarillo, has appointed Vernard, Rintoul & McConnell natl rep 
and Clarke Brown Associates as southern rep 

KAOK, Lake Charles, La, has appointed Stars National natl rep 

KAPA, Raymond. Wash, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KBCH, Oceanlake, Ore, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KBMO, Benson. Minn, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KELP. KILT <tv), El Paso, have been purchased by Richard E. Jones, 
Joseph Harris and Norman Alexander 

KCEO-TV, Oklahoma City, has appointed Blair Tv Associates natl rep 

KHAM, Albuquerque, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KILT (tv), El Paso, has become KELP-TV 

KLEN, Killeen, Texas, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KOBY, SF, has appointed Edward Pctry natl rep and Forjoe as LA rep, 
effective 1 June 

KVHL, Homer, La, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KWBC, Boone, Iowa, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

KWKW, LA, has appointed National Time Sales eastern & midwestern rep 



KXLE. Ellensburg. Wash, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WBOK, New Orleans, has appointed Stars National natl reps 

WCEF, Parkersburg, W Va, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcast- 
ing System 

WDON, Wheaton, Md, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WHAV, Haverhill, Mass, has appointed Kettell-Carter New England rep 

WIL, St. Louis, has joined ABC Radio Net 

WLBR-TV, Lebanon, Pa, is now controlled by Triangle Publications 

WLOK, Memphis, has appointed Stars National natl rep 

WNYS. Salamanca, NY, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WPCO, Mount Vernon, Ind. is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System 

WPFA, Pensacola, Fla. is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WRFW, Eau Claire, Wise, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broad- 
casting System 

WRKE. Roanoke. Va, is now an affiliate of the Keystone Broadcasting 
System 

WTIC-TV, Hartford, has appointed Harrington, Righter & Parsons natl rep 

WXOK. Baton Rouge, has appointed Stars National natl rep 

WWIN, Bait, will join ABC Radio Net. effective 1 June 

WWL-TV, New Orleans, will become an affiliate of CBS Tv Net, effec- 
tive 1 August 



' 



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25 may 1957 






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all major media . . . tip- on when to u~<- each medium . . . 
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product . . , how ton advertisers and agencies use and tesl 
media . . . plus hundreds oi other media plana, suggestions, 
((itiiiul.i- you can put tn profitable use. 



2 TV Dictionary/Handbook 



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The new edition contains 2200 definitions "t television terms 
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REPRINTS 

Radio Results L956 

TV Results 1956 

Telei ision Ki-ics 

Radio Basics 

Film Basics 

\\ here Does the Money Go? 

Procter and Gamble Story 

Advertising Agency in Transition 

Tips on TV Commercials 

The Top 50 Air Agencies 

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SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 




sponsor • 25 \m I""'. 



59 



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Out where I come from we swear 
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KGNC-TV was the first tv 
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AMARILLO, TEXAS 

NBC-TV Affiliate 

THE KATZ AGENCY 

Affiliated with KCNC-Radio and the 
Amarillo Globe News 






■ . in; • : . 



60 



r. Sponsor 



Richard E. Forbes: multi-million traffic cop 

1 1) a declining car market, Chrysler has copped a bigger share of 
the market this year than during any previous year. Neither Dick 
Forbes, corporate advertising director, nor any other top-level 
Chrysler executive will pin this success on advertising, let alone on 
one medium. 

"We've done a particularly progressive job of restyling, for in- 
stance." Forbes told SPONSOR. 

\oni-tht'lt'ss. ii - important to remembei thai Chrysler's advertis- 
ing strategy has kept pace with the styling, in terms of promoting 
"the forward look" on two major network tv vehicles: Shower of 
Stars and Climax, CBS TV, both sponsored by the Chrysler Corp. 
through McCann-Erickson. 

On the corporate and divisional levels combined, Chrvsler is put- 




troit commutin 



es us more bullish on radio." says Chrysler's Forbes 



ting some $18 million into the air media this year, and the bulk of 
this spending is network tv. Together, the air media account for 
more than 50', of Chrysler's over-all advertising expenditure. 

In relation to last year, spot tv has been used to a lesser degree 
than in 1956, whereas network tv is coming in for a bigger share. 

"We're in a transitional period now. since we absorbed the co-op 
expenditures into the factory budget in January."' Forbes told 
SPONSOR. "But I"m sure that a media balance will be restored as the 
local dealers begin using their local media more heavily. W e our- 
selves have prettv much absorbed the existing media plans that had 
been on a co-op basis and have maintained the same balance. 

Forbes, whose department is responsible to the administrative v.p. 
of Chrysler Corp., not onlv plans the advertising and sales promo- 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 






high 
time 




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Ml-, right in the middle of tin- day. 
cially u hen Warner Bros, feal u 
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Fori cample: woaw v, San Antonio, 
run, a Wan feature in the noon l :80 

time period Monday through Frida 
February \kb ratings showed a healthy L2.6 
average for the program, against 3.5 and 1.0 
for the two competing stations. And krca-tv, 
Sacramento, ran Warner Bros, features three 
weekday afternoon 10 i'.m., with a 

February arb average of L3.5, against 2.2 
and i)..") for the competition. 

All of which proves that good programs 
win viewers, daytime as well as nighttime. 
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^CONSUMER INCOME 

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Los Angeles: Tracy Moore Cr Associates 



62 



lion ul the Chrysler Corp. on the corporate level, but also acts in a 
consultant capacity to the various divisions. 

"The (li\isi<iiis operate virtually autonomously in terms of adver- 
tising and sales, except in such efforts that need coordinating, 
Forbes sa\s. "For instance, we naturally lime the new car an- 
nouncements in such a \\a\ that each division works in relation to 
the others. Also, when there's a network t\ buy that no one divi- 
sion can or wants to finance alone, we help them apportion the 
shared time." 

And, as is true in am organization that has a divisional (or 
product manager I set-up. Forbes, as the corporate advertising 
director, also acts as consultant on the choice of agencies. McCann- 
Erickson is the agency for Chrysler Corp. The various divisions 
work with Grant, BBDO and \. W. Ayer. Furthermore, a couple of 
smaller agencies handle several industrial products. 

"Thus, each division decides on its own commercial approach and 
on its own media strategy," Forbes sa\s. "But a look at Chrysler's 
tv properties, shows that most of the divisions are bullish on net- 
work tv. We've found that am property which gives mass familj 
exposure to a demonstration of our cars necessarilv is good for us." 

Mass circulation is an underlving theme for most of Forbes's 
media and advertising decisions. While he's conscious of the import- 
ance of women in either selecting a particular new car or at least 
exercising a veto power over their mens choice, he doesn't find it 
economical to isolate women as an advertising target. 

"For women use shot guns, not rifles," advises Forbes 

"There's a limit to the specialized audience vou can aim for," he 
says. "And actually for a car, there's no one buyer. Everyone we 
reach is a potential customer, including teen-agers who 11 be buying 
shortlv. Certainly in as expensive a medium as television, wed be 
buying circulation at too high a cost if we tried to segment the 
audience into the various individual groups we want to reach. Our 
best bet is a maximum mixed adult audience.' 

This search for maximum circulation at an efficient cost led 
Forbes some time ago to study network radio as a major media buy. 

"We feel it's a very attractive medium today," he told SPONSOR. 
"Recently, when we won the Mobilgas Economy Run. we went on 
Monitor and into some CBS Radio programing virtually overnight 
for a few days of saturation. It turned out to be a successful and 
effective buy. We were able to act on our decision almost overnight 
and capitalize on the news value of our announcements through the 
choice of adjacencies, our presentation of the message and the very 
immediacy of network radio's programing appeal today, "l ou're 
getting some of the same flexibility out of network radio today that 
vou generally seek in the spot media.' 

On his long daily drives from the Chrysler Highland Park offices 
to his home in Birmingham. Mich.. Forbes has ample chance to 
evaluate early-morning and late-night radio programing. 

"I guess Detroit must be a center of out-of-home radio listening 
judging from the tremendous traffic I run into every day and the 
distances most of us cover between home and work," be told SPONSOR. 

"I'llsay one thing — for me, the car trip's a pleasure, because it s the 
one place where my choice of listening preference counts. Once I get 
home, my wife and two kids take over, where tv's concerned." ^ 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



FIRST NEW RADIO STATION 
IN NEW YORK IN 14 YEARS 




1330 KC-THE NEW SOUND FOR NEW YORK 

with a hard-hitting new concept in programming — planned to 
produce new sales for advertisers in the world's largest market 

H. SCOTT KILLGORE, President & General Manager 

A Tele-Broadcasters Station • 41 East 42nd St. • N. Y. 17. X. Y. • MUrray Hill 7-8436 

KALI Pasadena, L. A. • WPOP Hartford, Conn. • KUDL Kansas City, Mo. • WKXV Knoxville, Tenn. 



SPONSOR • 2.i MAY 1957 



63 




there's 
something 
special 
about . . . 




siajseopBOjqapj, 

A*q pajuasaadajj 

s)l«M 000'S — sapXooii>i oSf'T 

eiujojirej^ 'sapSuy so^ 'euapesej 



it's a 

TELE-BROADCASTERS 

station 



TELE-BROADCASTERS, Inc. 

41 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill Y-8436 

H. Scott Killgore, President 

Owners and Operators of 

WPOW, New York, New York 
KALI, Pasadena, Los Angeles, Calif. 
KUOL, Kansas City, Missouri 
WPOP, Hartford, Conn. 
WKXV, Knoxville, Tennessee 






64 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 




SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Ideal Toy Corp., New York, is promoting its miniature Little Miss 
Revlon doll in a tv campaign in 16 major cities. Advertising for 
the doll is probably the largest that has ever been undertaken in 
the toy industry outside of the Fall-Christmas season. Ideal will use 
26 top-rated children's programs, most of which will show one- 
minute film commercials featuring the doll and its 30 Little Miss 
Revlon outfits. The original schedule started in April with tests in 
New York and Detroit. Ideal used spots on Club 60, Ask the 
Camera and Hopalong Cassidy, (WRCA-TV, New York) and 
Mickey Mouse Club I WXYZ-TY. Detroit I. The success of the 
campaign was the impetus behind Ideal's decision to go nationwide 
on tv this time of year. Frequency: 3-5 announcements per week. 
Buying is completed. Buver: Dorothv Hoey. Agency: Grev Adver- 
tising. New York. 

Tidewater Oil Co., Eastern div.. New York, is purchasing an- 
nouncements in 21 markets in the Northeast, its area of distribution, 
to promote its Flying-A gasolines. Six-week campaign will start 28 
May. 20-second film announcement will be slotted during nighttime 
segments. Average number of announcements per week in each 
market will be eight. Buying is completed. Buyer : Mildred Ingvall. 
Agency: Buchanan. New York. 

Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., Hoboken, N. J., is going into 100 markets 
to promote iced tea. Four-to-six-week schedule will begin in June. 
Minute and 20-second film announcements will be placed during 
nighttime hours for a mixed audience. The number of announce- 
ments will vary from market to market. Buying is half completed. 
Buver: Tom Comerford. Agency: Young & Rubicam, New York. 

The National Brands, div. of Sterling Drug. New \ ork. is buying 
in a number of markets to advertise its ZBT Baby powder. The 13- 
week schedule starts 17 June. Station breaks and minutes on film 
will be aired during daytime segments. Average number of an- 
nouncements per week in each market will be three. Buying is com- 
pleted. Buyer: Rose-Marie Vitanza. Agency: Carl S. Brown Co.. 
Inc.. New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Armour & Co., Chicago, is going into a number of selected markets 
in the Southeast and Southwest for its Cloverbloom margarine. 
Short-term campaign will begin 10 June. Eight-second announce- 
ments will be placed primariK during 8-10 a.m. to reach a house- 
wive"s audience before shopping. Advertising is geared to special 
price promotion. Buying is not completed. Buyer : Sol Isreal. Agen- 
cy: N. W. A\er. New York. 

Lehn & Fink, New York, is entering top markets to advertise its 
Etiquet deodorants. Frequency for the fixe week schedule will range 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 










WBAY GREEN BAY 



in the land of. y# 






HAYDN R. EVANS, Gen M<jr R ep WEED TELEVISION 



SPONSOR • IS MAY 1957 






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Louisville 

When 

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John Fraim 

Louisvillians rely on the "John Fraim 
News" to keep them posted on the 
local, national and international news 
developments. His comprehensive news 
coverage, plus his many feature stories, 
make it not only interesting, but factual 
and worth while hearing regularly. A 
news service that succeeds in being all 
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WKLO 

LOUISVILLE Tftr 






66 



Spot buys continued. 






from LO-25 announcements per week in each market. Minute live 
announcements will be slotted during daytime hours lor a women's 
audience. Copy advertises the product at half-price. Buying is com- 
pleted. Buyer: Ja\ Schoenfeld. Agency: McCann-Erickson, New 

^.rk. 

The National Brands, div. of Sterling Drug. New York, is entering 
rural markets in the Southeast to advertise its antiseptic Campha- 
Phenique. Schedule will begin in mid-June and run for 13 week-. 
Minute live announcements will he purchased 7:30-9 a.m.. targeted 
for a mixed audience. Average number of announcements per week 
in each market will lie five. Buying has not started. Buyer: Bob 
Hall. Agencv : Thompson-Koch. New York. 

Schweppes (U.S.A.) Ltd., div. of Pepsi-Cola Co., New York, plans 
a campaign in about 15 East Coast markets for its tonic. The 10 to 
12-week campaign will start in mid-June. Minute and 20-second 
e.t.'s will be slotted during late afternoon and evening hours, next 
to news and sports shows wherever possible: objective is a male 
audience. Average number of announcements per week in each mar- 
ket will be 15. Buying is not completed. Buver: Frank Cianattasio. 
Agencj : Ogilvv. Benson & Mather. Inc.. New 1 ork. 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, plans to test its new Ivor) de- 
tergent in the Akron and Toledo markets, sponsor learns. It's be- 
lieved minute announcements will be scheduled during earlv morning 
and afternoon hours: frequencv per week will be about 25. I pon 
completion of the schedule, other markets will probably be tested. 
(Agency declined comment concerning anv aspect of the test, i Buy- 
ers: Pete Fulton and Ethel W eider. Agency: Compton, New A ork. 



RADIO AND TV BUYS 

The Texas Oil Co., New York, is entering 20-25 mid-western 
markets to advertise its new Supreme gasolene: product was intro- 
duced to the far west in April campaign. The schedule is for four 
weeks. On radio, minute and 20-second e.t. s will be placed 7-9 a.m. 
and 4-7 p.m. dailv and all hours on weekends. Average number of 
announcements per week in each market will be 00. On tv. minute 
and 20-second films will be scheduled 7-11 p.m. Frequency per week 
in each market will be 20. The advertising will sell the "tower of 
power"' slogan. Buving is completed. Buyer: Jack Bray, \gency: 
Cunningham & Walsh. New York. 

Shell Oil Co., New York, is entering 20 markets for its new Super 
Shell gasoline. Four-week t\ campaign consists of one week for I.D. 
teaser advertising: three weeks for 20-second and minute product 
announcements. Frequencv per week in each market will be 10 to 15 
during prime evening hours. In radio, it consists of 20-second teas- 
ers for the first week: minute product announcements for three 
weeks. Average number of announcements per week in each market 
will be 40 during earlv morning and late afternoon hours. Com- 
mercials in t\ will be on film: in radio e.t. and live. Other markets 
will be added throughout the summer. Buying in these markets is 
completed. Buyers: Frank Marshall and Cordon Dewart. Agency: 
J. Walter Thompson, New York. 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 




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Rep. by John E. Pearson Company 




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IN THE RICH 
TULSA 
MARKET... 



WHEN YOU USE 



KRMG 

50,000 WATTS 740 KC 

ASK YOUR 
BLAIR lOH 
FOR THE 
KRMG STORY 



68 




News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Idea at work: the Alcoa-Macy tie- 
in promoting "Live Light with 
Aluminum — It's Summer." 

I lie department store this week 
started featuring aluminum products 
in all of its six New York stores, a 
special Alcoa exhibition hall and 
aluminum in its decorations. The show 
will last through July. 

Alcoa, in turn did its commercials 
for the Alcoa Hour (NBC TV) direct 
from the department store, last Sunday. 

Alcoa and Macy exhibit will get 
further tv exposure on Home, The 
Price Is Right, and Tonight (all on 
NBC TV) and on Capt. Kangaroo 
(CBS TV). 

An unusual tv giveaway (roofs) 
has brought the Bird Co. a whop- 
ping response: over 100,000 re- 
quests. 

Bird, which sponsors a 15-minute 
segment of the Garry Moore Show 
I CBS TV), and its agency, Humphrey, 
Alley & Richards, decided to offer free 
roofs and installation to 10 of the 
viewers who sent in their names and 
addresses. Nothing else was required 
— no rhyme, entry blank or etc. The 
offer was made only twice (60 second 
announcement each time i . Expected 
response was set at 15.000 maximum. 

After recovering from the deluge 
of cards and letters, Bird is happily 
adding the 100,000-plus names to its 
roofing products prospect list. 

Two advertisers taking their first 
air media plunge are: 

• Angostura-Wupperman with plans 
to use network radio, details to be set, 
will plug use of Angostura as a food 
flavoring. 

• Lejon Vermouth testing tv via 
ID's in the Los Angeles area on four 
stations. Lejon has been using maga- 
zines and newspaper supplements up 
to now . 

Johnson (outboard) Motors has 
this idea working to get retail 






dealers to put more money into 
radio advertising: 

A 15-minute outdoor show, taped 
weekly, is sent to interested stations. 
First choice for sponsorship goes to 
Johnson Motors dealers (who have 
been briefed on the show already i, 
but if the dealer turns thumbs down, 
the station is free to approach other 
advertisers as long as they don't han- 
dle a product in direct competition 
with Sea-Horse outboard motors. 

New products: "Off", insect repel- 
lent put out by the makers of John- 
son's Wax. Off will he promoted on 
tv via the Red Skelton Shou i CBS 
TV I and Robert Montgomery Presents 
(NBC TV I and on radio through 
Monitor (NBC) plus various news- 
casts on MBS. FCB is the agency . . . 
"Charmers", a new Band-Aid prod- 
uct designed for the younger set I teen 
to tot I. Charmers come in various 
colors, shapes I including heart- 
shaped I . and patterns. They will be 
highlighted on Johnson & Johnson's 
Robin Hood show I CBS TV). Agency 
is Y&R. 

People in the news: Reorganization 
of Purex Corp. s marketing division 
puts Jock Northrup in as director 
of market research and public rela- 
tions and Leslie C. Bruce, Jr. as 
director of advertising and promotion 
. . . W. E. Boss has been named di- 
rector of color television coordination 
for RCA. . . . Emil Busching has 
been appointed v. p. in charge of sales 
for Dormin, Inc.. which uses tv spot 
for its sleep-inducer. . . . Roger H. 
Bolin has been appointed director of 
advertising for Westinghouse Electric 
Corp.. a newly created post. . . . Gro- 
ver C. ('lark has been promoted to 
merchandising manager of the associ- 
ated tires and accessories division of 
B. F. Goodrich and Robert O. How- 
ard succeeds Clark as advertising and 
sales promotion manager of the tires 
and accessories division. 
Sperry Rand's shaver commercials, 
which ha\e Schick buzzing to the ex- 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



ir.ii 1.1 .1 |S million dama ■<■ suit, \n ill 
he temporarily withdrawn from tele- 
xi-imi until a court hearing decides the 
issue mi 27 May. , , . The idvertis- 
in Center, year-round exhibition 
hall l"i i hi • iinil- and media ol sd\ ei 
rising, will open in New Vnk at 285 
Madison \\ e. on 3 Jun<-. 

AGENCIES 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample baa ere* 
■ted an executive committee to ini- 

liaic advise on. ami approve all 
major plans, basic ail campaigns 
and important recommendation 
to clients. 

Membership ol the committee will 
be appointed annually bj the board 
■ 'I directors. Sen ing mi tin- initial 
committee arc these vice presidents 
Chester I. Birch, Lyndon 0. Brown, 
Sidnej J. Hamilton, Gordon H. John- 
Bon, Fred I. Leighty, and George (i. 
Tormej . 

relevision was credited with ex- 
erting a "tremendous influence" 
on trademarks bj Sigrid II. Peder- 
sen, J\\ T attorney in her talk 
before the I . S. Trademark Asso- 
ciation last week. 

Miss Pedersen told the group that 
in the food and grocer) product field 
alone over !'>(>', ol the manufacturers 
have made a trademark <>r package 
change during the past tw> years and 
this was larger} due t'> "' I \ and super- 
market retailing." 

Miss Pedersen i» chairman ol the 
association's information committee. 

New agencj appointments: Rich- 
ard K. Manoff, Inc. for King Kone 
Corp. King Kone which distributes it- 
Old London melba t<>aM and crackers 
nationall) has not used air media, but 
Manoff i- an air-minded agenc) and 
either radio or t\ i not both i i- being 
considered seriousl) in current media 
plans. 

. . . SSCB for Lexer Brothers' Breeze. 
BBDO formerlx had the Breeze ac- 
count \\ isk. the newer brand, remains 
with RHDO. 

Focus on personalities: Clayton (i. 
Going has moved to BBPO's Los \n- 
geles office a- an account executive. 
Going conies from KHDO- San Fran- 
cisco branch . . . Richard K. Fisher 
bas joined I.W a- associate directoi 
of merchandising. He was formerlx 
director of community affairs for 
American Urlines . . . William J. 



where 
else 




milwaukee 



BUT ON 





CAN YOU REACH SO 
MANY GOOD PROSPECTS 
FOR THE MONEY 

WOKY consistently attracts a 
major share of Milwaukee's 
radio audience. So consistently. 
in fact, that virtually every 
time period represents Mil- 
waukee's most efficient radio 
buy. You consistently <, r et more 
for your money on WOKY, 
Milwaukee. 



• Milwaukee's most-listened-to independent radio station. 

• Lowest cost per thousand in the market. 

• Covers 54% of the population in wealthy Wisconsin. 

CALL YOUR KATZ REPRESENTATIVE FOR DOCUMENTED PROOF! 



FIRST in 




MILWAUKEE 



1000 waffs at 920 KC. 

24 hours of music, news and sports. 



A BARTELL 
GROUP STATION 



Other Bar-fell Group Stations: 

KCBQ, San Diego • KRUX, Phoenix 

WAKE, Atlanta • WMTV, Madison 

WAPL, Appleton 

Represented by: ADAM YOUNG, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 25 MXY 195' 



69 



Moore has joined B&B as director nl 
television operations . . . (i. Kenneth 
Vdams has joined Kal, Ehrlich & 
Merrick as an account executive . . . 
.Iran Carrol] lias been appointed 
media director for Compton's Los 
Angeles office . . . Joseph J. Trout 
has joined BBDO's marketing depart- 
ment . . . Norman J. J. Berger, 
former!) with Grej Vdvertising, has 
resigned li> become a partner and 
general manager at Leber \ Katz . . . 
Maurice J. Garrett has been ap- 
pointed Los Angeles liaison executive 
Eoi kudner. He replaces Stephen H. 
Richards \\ln> moves to the New ^ ork 
office as account manager for Buick 
. . . Marx Harlman as account execu- 
tive and Betty Dickie as production 
manager have joined the new firm of 
Bernie Eberl \ \ssociates, Los An- 
geles . . . Benita Camicia has joined 
("lint Sherwood. San Francisco as head 
of publicity and public relations. 
. . . Donah! L. McGee joins Honig- 
Cooper as a merchandising account 
executive. McGee was formerly with 
Buchanan & Co. . . . William R. 
Pinkney, formerly of WTVH. Peoria, 
has joined Ross Advertising. Peoria, 
as head of the newly formed radio-tv 
division. 

New agencies, new names: Richard 
Lane & Co., Kansas City. Mo., has 
been established by Richard Lane. 
formerl) of Standart. OHern & Lane 
. . . The Rumrill Co. is the new 
name for Charles L. Rumrill Co., Roch- 
ester. N. Y. 

NETWORKS 

Looks like the situation comedy 
will again be the leading format 
among night-time sponsored pro- 
grams on network to come this 
fall: 

The networks have quite a wavs to 
go to complete their 1957-58 schedules, 
but here s a comparison of major pro- 
gram t\pes between next falls lineup 
a- set to date and the sponsored sched- 
ule which prevailed last fall: 

PROGKWI NO. SHOWS NO. SHOWS 

TYPE SET '57-58 FALL '56 

Sit. Comedy 15 17 



Western 


11 


11 


Quiz-Panel 


9 


15 


Y2 Hr. Drama 


8 


11 


Hour Drama 


7 


14 


Adventure 


8 


8 


M> Hr. \ arietj 


1 


5 


Hr. Varietj 


6 


8 


. ih. Mysterj 


6 


5 



7(1 








ices: New fork. Cincinna 



Sales Representat ves: NBC Spi it Salek: Detroit, Los A igele , San Franciscq 



Bomar Lowrance & Associates. Inc., ChBrlottet Atlanta, Dallad . . . 

I 1 



Crosley 



Jroadtasting Corpora 1 






(flVGQ 

vision of SI 






HE 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



71 



PICTURE WRAP-UP 




Bearded man on t\ ami at r. is Sal Maglie. Dodger pitcher, who 
appears in Remington shaver tv commercial (agency: Y&R) is 
watched l>\ Sal Jr. Clean-shaven Maglie takes GE portable on trips 



Outstanding advertising won 
awards for WGR-TY and Radio, 
Buffalo from the Niagara Frontier 
Advertiser's Association (r.), station 
managers Van Beuren W. De \ ries, 
WGR-TV and Nat L. Cohen. WGR 
Radio receive awards from T. Sloane 
Palmer, director of the association 



New president of Radio-TV Ex- 
ecutives Society in N. Y. is ABC 
v.p. John Daly (1.), succeeding 
Bob Burton, BMI (r.). With them: 
Leonard Goldenson. president AB-PT 



"Hot line" merchandisers via closed circuit sales meet for Del 
Monte in 24 cities are (1. to r.) Matt Culligan. NBC Radio v.p.: Chet 
Huntley. NBC news; J. H. Allen, Del Monte division sales manager 






Best guess on -pring thaw date 
won jackpot for Joe Gavin (r.) of 
Cunningham & Walsh. Annual con- 
tesl i- held by WDSM-TV, Duluth. 
for timebuyers. C. I). '"Duke'" Tully. 
gen. manager, presents award as 
Charles kinn<\ P( \\ a ■ :■ w^ilhec 



Most exclusive audience of ad 
men i- aim of Westinghouse Broad- 
casting with its car card- on N.Y. 
area commuter train-. Installers 
i from I.) : Philip Everest, v.p.. 
Transportation Displays; Dave Par- 
tridge. WBC ad mgr. : Max Gibbons. 
a e with Ketchum, Mad. cod. Grove 





TRAVELERS BROADCASTING 



SERVICE CORPORATION 



announces 



the appointment of 

PARSONS, INCORPORATED 



HARRINGTON, R1GHTER & 

WTIOTV CHANNEL 3 

0N THE A,R SEPTEMBER. 1957 



HARRINGTON, RIGHTER & PARSONS SALES OFFICES: NEW YORK. CHICAGO. SAN FRAN 



CISCO and ATLANTA 




sponsor • 25 \m 1957 



73 



NBC T\ *s specials (remember, 
"spectaculars" has been Btricken 
from the network's lexicon) Mill 
be wearing this new look next sea- 
son: 

• One a week (on the average i . 

• Scheduled al different hours. 

• \o more Producers Showcase or 
Saturday Color Carnival labels. 

So far there are 21 (possibly 22 1 
specials set. These include: six for 
Timex watches I Boh Hope I: nine for 
Oldsmobile isi\ with Jerrj Lewis, two 
Dean Martin Shows and the Acadcim 
Wards broadcast); five or possible 
six for Pontiac; and Rexall Drug's 
Pinocchio ion 13 October). 

This means that the network plans 
at least 17 specials more to meet that 
one-a-week plan. Some of these will he 
documentaries, like Project 20. 

Fall tv programing notes: The 
British filmed situation comedy 
Dick ami the Dwhess with Mogen 
Da\id Wines and Helene Curtis alter- 
nating is the most likely candidate for 
the Saturday night 8:30-9 berth on 
CBS TV . . .Royal McBee has joined 
Chemstrand as alternate sponsor for 



NBC TVs Sally scries. Sundays 7:30- 
!! p.m. . . . Ronson has picked up the 
Monda) and Thursda) segments of the 
SBC Sews plus an additional 32 por- 
tions including Wednesda) and Friday 
nights for the first 13 week-. The 
SBC Sews switches to a new time be- 
ginning 9 September and w ill be broad- 
cast both at 6:45 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. 

NBC's Matthew J. Culligan (v.p. 

radio network) this week drama- 
tized his "Imagery Transfer" con- 
cept in this manner: 

• Sent out to the press bushel bas- 
kets of cigarettes, with each pack en- 
closed in a small plain hag with onl\ 
ke\ words from the ad brand copy for 
identification. Example: "Filter. Fla- 
vor." 

• Included these instructions: "Pick 
your favorite brand bv its slogans. 

Similar baskets had previously gone 
to agencies throughout the country. 
The reactions, says the network, have 
been very gratifying. 

Current network tv programing 
notes: Telephone Time moves from 
Thursday nights on ABC TV to Tues- 



BEST SWOTOFTWIVEAR 



$n 



5f° 



tit* 



f* 



ll* 



IN Use ZOJULV ADDEAWHezjo 



"Radio (iiul Television 

Basics are as essential to 

an agency as a good 

client. They're required 

reading lor timebttyers, 

account supervisors, 

executives and copy people. 

They're easy to read, too." 

Don P. Nothanson 

president, 

\ oith Advertising Inc., 

Chicago 



days 9:50-10 p.m. effective 11 June 
. . . Bulova will sponsor an hour-long 
special on NBC T\ Saturday, 1 June 
(9-10 p.m.). It'll be a musical variety 
titled "Five Stars for Spring." 



The Mort Abrahams-Granada TV 

international swap gets its kick-off 
I ft July with a British production 
of Reginald Rose's ""Thunder on 
Sycamore St." 1 

The English-l . S. exchange program 
was recentb set up b\ Abrahams, ex- 
ecutive producer of !NBC TV's Pro- 
ducers' Showcase, and Granada, one 
of Britain s two commercial networks. 
Idea behind the trade of top creative 
talent is I a I British commercial tv, 
still quite young, feels it can learn 
much about technical organization and 
(b) U. S. producing, directing and 
writing talent feel the\ can have a 
place to show their wares without 
a<ienc\ -client restrictions. 



Summer tv programing notes: 
The Web, newly filmed m\ stery se- 
ries, will take over for the Loretta 
Young Show on NBC TV i Sunday, 
10-10:30 p.m. I starting 7 July while 
repeats of the Loretta Young series 
will be used by Speidel and Purex in 
their Tuesday 8-8:30 p.m. slot on NBC 
TV starting 2 July . . . . Mogen David 
will replace Treasure Hunt on ABC TV 
(Friday. 9-9:30 p.m. I with a filmed 
series called Key Club Playhouse start- 
ing 31 Ma\. These are Ford Theatre 
re-runs and will promote the wine com- 
pany's new brand. Key Wines. . . . As- 
sociated Products replaces General 
Electric as alternate sponsor on ABC 
TV's Broken Arrow (Tuesday. 9-9:30 
p.m. I starting 4 June. This leaves G.E. 
v. ith only two network tv shows. Chey- 
enne on ABC T\ and G.E. Theatre on 
CBS TV. G.E. started the season last 
October with four network television 
entries. 

Highligh's of the Leonard H. Gol- 
denson, AB-PT president, WBKB 
dedication talk in Chicago last 
week included : 

• ABC T\ will add Omaha. Boston. 
Miami. New Orleans. Pittsburgh, Fort 
Wayne and Norfolk. Va., to its affili- 
ates list w ithin a year. 

• This year 85 out of even 100 
American t\ homes will be able to take 
their pick of all three networks. 

• And with delaxed telecasts ABC 



74 



SPONSOR • 25 MAY 1957 



I V will reach '>v , of all U. S. t\ 
homes. 

NBC l{;i(li.»*^ new "See Tor Your- 
self Research Plan* 1 works 1 1 • i — > 

wny : 

• I In- network is setting u|> a re- 
search fund which will pa) all costs 
ill sales effectiveness studies foi adver- 
tisers who (a) plan a long enough and 

frequent enough campaign to | luce 

measurable results, and 1 1> > use Bome 
exclusive cop) points bo thai radio's 
effectiveness ran be isolated from other 
ad media use. 

• NBC Radio will pa) costs up to 
110,000 "ii studies with techniques tail- 
ored to meet specific needs of the indi- 
\ idual advertiser. 

• rypical methods which ma) be 
used include: store audits, tesl market 
< omparison, consumer panel studies 
and before-and-after surveys of brand 
awareness and acceptance. 

Details of the plan will be submitted 
in writing to research directors of all 
ad agencies. 

The effect of the Ford order on 
long-range programing plans was 
reviewed at the meeting of the 
board of directors of the CBS Ra- 
dio Affiliates Association in New 
1 oik lasl week. 

\i the same time John S. Hayes, 
president, WTOP, Washington, I). (.. 
was elected to succeed Donald \\ . 
Thornburgh from District 3, who ten- 
dered his resignation from the Board 
due to eye surger) ; and C. Glover 
Delaney, vice president, \\ III'.C. Roch- 
ester, N. "> .. was elected to succeed 
George I). Coleman from District 2. 

Sylvester "Pat*" Weaver has signed 
np the first advertiser for his new 
Program Service plan. 

la) lor-Reed Corp. (Coca-Marsh I is 
set to sponsor Ding Dong School in 
eight markets (Chicago, New York, 
Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Cleveland, Cincinnati and St. Louis) 
starting 1 July. The program will be 
live and originate in New } ork. Sta- 
tion line-up lias not been revealed as 
yet. 

Sid Caesar, who terminated bis con- 
tract with NBC last week, is expected 
to join Weaver in his planned 15-cit) 
network. (See sponsor, 18 May, ""Can 
Pat Lick His Own System?" for 
details on Weaver's Program Servii 



SPONSOR 



25 m\y 1957 



WHICH TV STATION 



m 



SOUTH BEND? 



"****+*******$* 



•net 



RANK 



PROGRAM 

J Love Lucy 

Red &V Sec ' e ' 

The Millionaire 
Sivlfe? at »r 

Hft^° 00 , Ques ''on 

Decei°K Ck Stents 
December Bride 

= d Sullivan Show 
$64,000 ChaMeTge 

Ciimax TrU$t Your We? 

Lassie 

Robi n Hood 

pk , L? ,ver » Show 
Playhouse 90 

TheLine p yPr0aram 
Gunsmoke 
Name That Tune 
Tour Hit Parade 



WSBT-TV station r| 



STATION "r 



36.8 



31.6 



AKBRating S _Feb 



r "ory 8th thro Feb 



K 



roary 14th 



43 OF THE 50 TOP-RATED SHOWS ARE 
CARRIED BY WSBT-TV 
There's ao doubt about it W SB I - I \ dominates the 
South Bend television picture One audience stud] after 
anoi her proves this. You just don l cover ^..mli Bend 
unless you use WSBT-1 \ ! Write tor detailed market data 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO., INC., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



WSBT 




CBS A CBS BASIC 

OPTIONAL STATION 




SOUTH 

BEND, 

IND. 

CHANNEL 

34 



75 



WGR-TV 

SELLS 

BUFFALO ! 




ABC AFFILIATE CHANNEL 2 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



\\ 



// 



49'K, 

COLOTAH 

Western Colorado and 
Eastern Utah 

Has only 1 source of 

^television 

KREX-TV Grand Junction 
with satellite 

KFXJ-TV Montrose, Colo. 

• 
Contact our Ambassador 



CHICAGO 



NEW YORK 



TV STATIONS 

Television and radio will continue 
to get more and more of national 
advertising budgets was the pre- 
diction of Donald II. McCannon. 
[(resident of Wcstinghouse Broad- 
casting Co., as he summarized the 
activities and accomplishments of the 
four-da\ WBC management meeting 
last week. 

Other findings of the group which 
included advertising and broadcasting 
leaders were: 

• The national economy as it affects 
the electronic media will continue to 
be favorably strong. 

• Viewing and listening will con- 
tinue to grow. 

• Growth of the broadcasting in- 
dustry must include substantial con- 
sideration of technological improve- 
ments. 

• Local stations have great oppor- 
tunities to build prestige and believa- 
bility via public service. 

An idea at work at KING-TV, Se- 
attle, is the recent "Win-A-House" 
promotion sponsored by Gold 
Shield Coffee (Lang & Co.). 

The contest, which was plugged via 
spots (300 over a period of four and 
a half months) and increased sales 
20%, (1) established Gold Shield as 
an advertised brand of high quality 
coffee, (2) improved relations with 
jobbers, groups and chains, and (3) 
did a "tremendous job" in regard to 
label identification. 

The sponsor is continuing his tv 
campaign now that the contest is over. 
Pacific National is the agency. 

Tv applications: Between 13 and 18 
May two applications for new stations 
were filed. 

Applications include: Carl Bloom- 
quist, Eveleth, Minn., for Channel 10. 
Hibbing, Minn., 10.6 kw visual with 
tower 633 feet above average terrain, 
plant $133,983; and Winston-Salem 
Broadcasting Co., Winston-Salem, for 
Channel 13. Aquadilla. Puerto Rico. 
115.9 kw visual with tower 2,050 feet 
above average terrain. Plant $199,319: 
yearly operating cost $120,000. 

Promotions and changes: Clark 
Pollock has been appointed opera- 
tions executive for WLBR-TV. Leba- 
non, Penna. . . . Jack Dolph has been 
made assistant program director for 




Men in TV production all say: 

''The best spots come from Jamieson" 




JAMIESON 

FILM COMPANY 

3825 Bryan • T A 3-8158 • Dallas 

nclude : 

Fitzgerald Advertising Agency 
Crawford & Porter Advertising. Inc. " 
McCann-Erickson. Inc. 
Tracy-Locke Company, Inc." 




6 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



\\< \[ l\ Philadelphia. . . . Bill 

\\ .ilk< I . t • • ■ mil pro lion in. in 

for KBTV, I lem er, has resigned to 
join WFGA-TV, Jacksonville, Fla., in 
the Bame oapacity. , . . UNI Lydle has 
joined the k<> \ ■ I \ . Denver, sales -tall 
... II. Paul Field has been appointed 
1. 1 take over the neM K -created posl "I 
commercial Bei \ i> es supei \ isoi .ii 
\\ l\ I. Miami. . . . Johnnj Carpen- 
ter n n »\ <~- up as the new public rela- 
tions director .it K» >l\ I A . Portland, 
Ore. . . . John J. (Jim) Black, Jr. 
been promoted to local and re- 
gional -air- tnanagei at K I \ V Mus- 
kogee-Tulsa. . . . \\ illiam I'. Mac- 
Crystal], genera] -ale- manage] al 
k()\-T\. Denver, to head up the man- 
1 1 it-iii nl a group id t\ ami radio 
stations including: k\(>\ \\l & TV, 
Tucson, ami KOAT-TV, Vlbuquerque. 
Richard Harris, account executive al 
KOA-TV will replace MacCrystall. . . . 
Adrian R. Munzell, program direc- 
tor at \\ IS T\ . Columbia, S. C, lias 
been upped to executive producer and 
film buyer and Dixon Loworn 
nn>\fs into the program director spot. 
. . . Boh Edell has been appointed 
promotion manager ol WJBK-TV, De- 
troit. . . . Stephen ('. Meterparel lias 
joined \\ BZ-TV . Boston, as assistant 
advertising and sales promotion man- 
ager and Ted Vi robel has joined the 
station's sales staff .... Henry J. 
(Hank) Davis has been appointed to 
the sales stall of KT\ \. Muskogee- 
Tulsa. . . . Maurice Corbetl has been 
named merchandising director for 
W'l'VJ, Miami. . . . George II. Cum- 
mings has been appointed sales pro- 
motion manager for \\(i\\ and 
\\t.\VT\. Portland, Maine. . . . New 
personnel line-up at KOLO-TV. Reno, 
includes: Lee David Hirahland, lo- 
cal sales manager; Ed Cardinal, pro- 
mam director and operational super- 
visor: George Rogers, local sales. . . . 
I.. I'aul Abert has been named assis- 
tant production manager for WTIC- 
I A . Hartford. Conn. 

WFIE. Inc. is the company which 
now owns and operates WFIE-TV, 
Evansville, Ind., replacing Premier 

Television. Inc. The new corporation 
is a subsidiary of \\ \\ E, Inc. . . . 
KPTV is now a basic NBC T\ affiliate 

RADIO STATIONS 

KMO\. St. Louis. Radio Week 
promotion pulled a whopping big 
mail response 1 19.80.1 pieces of 



mail and over 'H.immi answers in 

our da) alone 

Gimmick was '■ si ition 

personalities oi eithei i portabli 
clock radio a day. Response topped 

la si \ c.ii ~ pi amotion bj 60' • . 

Promotion isn't onlj what keeps 
an advertiser's product al the top 

of the m-w~: il also holds B local 

station in front-line position. 
Tak. CJON in St. John's, New- 

toiimllaml which, anion " othei 



|. i tl\.- I- llvll 

aiders thai residents do othei than "live 
ind 
|o i with the news 

Ii has pi. i« ed 1 0,0 this 

I ovei the island. I he n- 
spol ami the mo»l unlikely wat < ho- 
i promotion on film foi it- i\ 
affiliate. \ 750 pound -h.uk I I 
long was drowned, and a station 
put in In- mouth undei watei while 

Ii ■ .w-nl into .n lion. 

Station changes: hlt/.V Salem, 




SPONsnK 



25 MAY 1951 



AVAILABLE NOW 

S. John Srhil^ 

Until last week general 
manager KLOR, Chan- 
nel 12, Portland, Ore- 
gon. Responsible for 
launching station and 
building it into top- 
flight property. Prior ex- 
perience: 7 years exec. 
V. P. Rocky Mt. Broad- 
casting. 4 years Sales 
Manager Pacific North- 
west Broadcasters. 10 
years Advertising Man- 
ager chain of Depart- 
ment stores. (See B'T 
"resume page 20, June 
4, 1956 issue ... Re- 
spects To") 46 years 
old, married, 5 children. 

Qualified to: Manage 
TV station, direct pub- 
lic relations, in any field, 
handle tough agency as- 
signment or do your im- 
portant selling. 

Salary requirements: 
$25,000 fulltime. Slight- 
ly higher for a quick 
"brainpicking". 

To save time, first call 
. . . Norm Knight, George 
Hollingbery, Carl Hav- 
erlin, Lee Jahncke, 
Harry Bannister, How- 
ard Lane ... or someone 
you know, who should 
know. Then call or write 
me. 110 SE 41st, Port- 
land, Oregon. Phone 
BEImont 2-9321. 



Ore., wenl on the air 1 Ma\ with Al 
Bauer as general manager. An NBC 
affiliate, it operates with 250 w on 
1490 kc. . . The Bartell Group of five 
stations has purchased a sixth: 
WBMS, Boston, managed l>\ Nor- 
man B. Furmun. 

Negotiation for the sale of KJ\^. 

I opeka, to a group of four Kansas 
Citj investors is underway. Prospec- 
tive buyers are: Ed Schulz and Dale 
S. Helmers, both account executives 
at KMBC, Kansas Citj : Joseph \\ . 
McCoskrie, contractor and William 
Overton, attorne) and president of the 
Anchor Savings & Loan. Kansas Citj 
. . . Another station celebrating its 
35th anniversary is WBAP, Fort 
Worth, Texas. 

People in the news: Fred L. Bern- 
stein, former v.p. and southern divi- 
sional manager for Forjoe. has been 
named executive v.p. of the Gordon 
Broadcasting Co. and managing direc- 
tor of WSAI, Cincinnati. Other WSAI 
promotions include : Harold O. Par- 
ry, now v.p. local sales; P. Howard 
Eieher, now assistant sales manager. 
. . . George R. Collisson has been 
named sales manager at KOTK. Okla- 
homa City. . . . J. T. Snowden, Jr. 
has been appointed sales manager of 
WGTC. Greenville, N. C. . . . John 
Behnke has been named account ex- 
ecutive at KOMO. Seattle. . . . Carl 
Uhlarik has been named promotion 
manager and George C. Mirras is 
the new sales development manager 
for WOW, Omaha. . . . Stan Mon- 
crieff has been appointed public rela- 
tions director of CHUB. Nanaimo, 
B. C. . . . John H. Pace, v.p. and gen- 
eral manager of Public Radio Corp.. 
Houston, has taken over direct man- 
agement of KIOA. . . . Edward T. 
Hunt is now sales manager for 
WDGY, Minneapolis. . . . James K. 
Witaker, former general manager of 
WQOK. Greenville. S. ('.. has moved to 
WIS. Columbia. S. C. as director of 
sales. . . . Richard Lueters, mer- 
chandising director for WEEI. Boston, 
has joined the sales staff as a local 



account executive. . . . Al \ unovich 

has been named sales manager for 
KCKN, Kansas City. . . . Edward T. 
Hunt has joined \\ DGY. Minneapolis 
as sales manager. 

FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merril Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 



REPS 

Calling today's selling techniques 
a "mass and a mess of statistics."* 
Robert H. Teter, v.p. and radio 
director at Peters, Griffin. Wood- 
ward, told the Pennsylvania Asso- 
ciation of Broadcasters last week 
that, "We should he working hard 
at developing new approaches." 

Teter pointed out "Too often, there 
is a tendencv to lose sight of whether 





w t~ c C ■ V IB 




^^M ^m^^^^^- mi ^ m W±. ■ 


- ,"i_ pl J U 


1 — - 




W 


SPARTANBURG, S.C. 

Ca//-Gi-ant Webb*. Co. 






Tues. 


Tues. 


Net 


Stock 


11 Ma\ 


21 May 


Change 


Veto 


York Stock Exchange 






\H I'T 


24% 


21 


— 


% 


AT&T 


178'a 


178 :! , 


+ 


W 


Avco 


6-\ 


6 :: , 


+ 


Vs 


CBS "A" 


35% 


35% 


— 


% 


Columbia Pic 


17% 


i: :; i 


— 


Vs 


I.ocu 'e 


19? , 


20 


+ 


% 


Paramount 


35% 


35% 


+ 


■ ; . 


RCA 


38% 


38V 2 




% 


Storcr 


28 


27% 


— 


% 


20th-Fox 


27-', 


27% 






Warner Bros. 


25' ■> 


25 's 


— 


■■■'^ 


Westinghouse 


61% 


6<l :i , 


— 


T v 


American Stock Exchange 






Allied Artists 


3y 2 


3% 


+ 


K 


C&C Super 


% 


U 


+ 




DuMont Labs 


5% 


5% 






Guild Films 


4 


3% 


— 


% 


NTA 


8% 


8% 


— 


% 



"Who knows? He might turn out to 
be a KRIZ Phoenix personality!" 



78 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 






the vehicle is righl f"i the produi t, 
and putting himseli in the pla< e "I .1 
timebuyei said, "1 <l welcome a Bales- 
man who Iffi hi- slide lull- home and 
came in talking about what hi- show 
could ili> Tin m\ client. 



Vir radio and in commercials sub- 
standard? Competitive media's bait- 
ing has led radio ami t\ into apologiz- 
ing for commercials, Bays Joseph I. 
\\ eed, president i>f \\ eed I \ , 

Weed feels that it is this "sniping" 
from other media that has prompted 
the countless suggestions for the need 
to iiujn n\ e commercials. 

FILM 

\ film series which can !»<• run as 
either a half-hour or feature 

length program is being distributed 
b] Official Films. 

The program is R<></,\ Jones, Space 
Ranger, produced 1>\ Roland Reed Jr. 
Reed 9I10I the 39 stanza series in se- 
quences of three half hour- each with 
f 11 II \ integrated storj lines, [his gives 
Btations the opportunity to program 
l_' 90-minute |>lus three 30-minute 
shows. 

\\ ith this program structure, Official 
announced, "'station- are afforded in- 
■ rease I opportunities to capture theii 
audiences in time periods normally de- 
\ oied to feature show bags." 
Guild Film's sales for their cur- 
rent fiscal year now .")'._, months 
-"lie 1 aie running more than three 
limes the total figure for the full pre- 
vious fiscal year. 

I his was announced at a stockhold- 
er-' meeting 1!! Ma\ 1>\ Reuben Kauf- 
man. Guild president The currenl 
-ale- total is more than $10 million. 

Though Kaufman didn't use the 
word "barter" he referred to it- u-e in 

passing bj saj bag, '". . . we have devel- 
oped methods of utilizing (program 
-cries 1 to generate valuable t\ adver- 
tising time which your com pan) sells 
to leading sponsors." 

Kaufman also referred to negotia- 
tions for distribution rights for prod- 
uct from "one of the America's best 
known major film studio-." The studio 
referred to i- believed to be one of 
those which have not yet released pre- 
1948 product to tv. 

V unique profit-sharing plan ha- been 
-it up wherein station- programing 

V Vl'"s Popeye cartoons share in 



the income fr Popeye residuals f*he -ln-w will be produced jointl) 

like I -hill-, n Is, I L-. 1I1. b) I .1 Bl I nid V.I 

I In plan provides thai i-i station! ndie Productions. I In- lattei 

devoting a minimum rtumbei "t pro- Hawkeye and the Last of the 

'.■lain pro lion announcements week- Mohicans will ' B( 

K share with \ VP, 1 rdinji to the N I \'- 



-i/c oi ilieii hi ritoi 11- 111 the manu 
fai iiini - profits. Ilic plan ha- been 

initiated in \cw i ..ik I il\ with \\ l'l\. 



1- now Bold to 

stations \ M' ports thai n 

• enl \I.T. < u- \\ ai nei I 

^ carl 1 16 1 ating in I T 

Mtl I I I ilm- 

TPA's second co>production deal has bought the Charlu Farrell tl 
in Canada has finall) gotten Tugboat .1 L2-episode block aired on CBS l\ 
tnnie oft the ground. last summer, from Hal Roach, \< & 



CKLWS Disc Jockeys 'are 



/ 



The O Busiest 

V ^in the Detroit Ar 




TOBY DAVID 

6:45-9:45 am. 

Mon. thru Fri. 
Music, time, weather, 
comedy! Everything to at- 
tract listeners and keep 
them listening at the 
wake-up hours. 



BUD DAVIES 

12:30-1 1:30-2 
Mon. thru Fri. 
Music in a pleasing manner 
for early afternoon listeners. 
Variety and guest interviews 
with celebrities. 



800k 



m\ 



EDDIE CHASE 
3 30 4 45 6 15 7 

Mon. thri. 
Late ofternoon and dinner 
hour music for everyone 
Good listening for rolling 
home'' motorists. 



UTUAL 
50,000 Watts - GUARDIAN BLDG., DETROIT 

ADAM YOUNG, Inc. J. E. CAMPEAU 

National Rep. President 



SPONSOR • 23 MAY 1957 







we deliver 
1000 



like this 
for 31c 



* 



luch prettier, actually, froltt a sponsor's point of view, because 
these ladies buy! And at WVNJ you can talk to a thousand 
of them (and their families) for one minute at a cost of only 31c. 
Same rate for men, too. 

Most advertisers know that the New WVNJ has more listeners 
than any other radio station broadcasting from New Jersey. As 
a matter of fact — almost twice as many as the next 2 
largest combined.* 

'Source — Hooperatings Jan. — Feb. — New Jersey 

Most advertisers know the quality of this audience — for the new 
programming concept of playing only Great Albums of 
Music has brought the station thousands of new and potentially 
better buyers than ever before. 

Most advertisers know, too, that WVNJ delivers this audience 
at less cost per thousand than any other radio station not 
only in Jersey but in the entire metropolitan area as well. 

That's why WVNJ is the hottest radio station in the New 
Jersey market — bar none. Get the facts and you'll 
make WVNJ part of your advertising day. 




Represented by- 
Broadcast Times Sales 
New York OX 7-1696 



WVNJ 



Newark, New Jersey 
Radio Station of the Newark Evening News 



JUl 



SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



II hoi's fuspprmng in / N I .uvernmcnl 
tiuU uffects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



25 MAY 

Ctpyriaht 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The FTC this week let i\\ its first preliminary action Bgainsl llic iiianin-the- 

white-ooal type of t\ commerciaL 

Singled «>ui as a sort of guinea pig ia American Chicle Co.'a RoIaJda brand. 

In issuing a complaint against Rolaida, FTC aidea disclosed it i- then plan firat t<» de- 
velop the case ami then see hon tin- eommiaaion rules on it. Should tin- commiaaion- 

era take a stern \ irw oi thi> type oi advertising, the stall will i ted t oi 

similar-type sponsors. 

The charges in the Rolaid complaint cover thi> ground: 

• False disparagement oi competing alkalizers, 

• Misrepresentation of the effecta of the product vis-a-vis competitive producta 
(comparing a burnt tableeluth hole with the action of .stomach acids). 

• Use of a man-in-a-whitc-coat to state that Rolaida baa the recommendation of die 
medical profession, therein having the "capacity to deceive a substantial portion of the public.*' 

This is the first complaint centered on the visual part of t\ commereiala since 
the special radio-tv unit was set up within the Fit . 

(See "The FTC Crackdown. :>u March SPONSOR, fur the Intended scope <>f tli- I H - 
probe of air conunercials and the follow-up plans for the FCC.) 



You can get a broad picture of the current state of the American econonrj 

from these excerpts from a Department of Commerce report issued this week: 

• Gross national product rose again in the first 1957 quarter, indicating an an- 
nual rate of $427 billion, compared with $121 billion for the last quarter of 1T>(> and 5 
billion for the first quarter of 1956. 

• Personal income in April was at a seasonally adjusted rate of $339.5 billion— up SI 
billion from March and SIB billion over April '56. 

• Total output has risen irregularly, but final demand has grown steadily. In the first 
1957 quarter output rose 1>\ S8.5 billion (annual rate). 

• Personal consumption expenditures, governmental purchases, and exporta all 
rose. The higher level of purchasing ate into business inventories, although l'< of the 
increase in value of production was <lut- to higher prices and onlv 2'.' to higher volume. 



Rep. Robert C Byrd (D., W. Va.) this week joined the clan calling for regula- 
tion of the tv networks. 

The source of his complaint: CBS TV's switching its affiliation from \\l Ml- I \. 
Charleston, to WHTM-TV. Huntington, following the bitter's purchase !>\ Cowles. 

Charged Rep. Byrd: The FCC "exerts a life-and-death hammerlock over individual sta- 
tions, while the networks are left to their own designs — often at the public's exp 



The near future could bring a welter of report releasing on < apitol Hill 
well as some action by the FCC on fee tv. 

Two such reports that are of marked interest to tv: The Celler Committee findings on its 
network probe, and the Senate Commerce Committee's multi-faceted look at t\. 



Radio and tv got a comparatively cleaner hill than newspapers in a report thi- 
week I»n the National Association of Better Business Bureaus on questionable ad-. 

Of the ads "investigated," 21,915 applied to newspapers, 635 to radio. 594 to t\. and 56 

to magazines. 



• 25 may 1957 



81 







triangle: stations 




Delivering 

TO 

Audiences 




EXCLUSIVE 

ONLY TRIANGLE STATIONS deliver ALL of 
the top film product available to television, 
reaching ONE out of every TEN TV homes in 
America . . . 15,000,000 people in Connecticut, 
Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. 



. Bci*ic ABC • WNBF-TV . . Basic CBS + ABC, NBC 
WFBG-TV . . Ba>ic CBS * ABC NBC • WNHC-TV . . Basic ABC + CBS 
Blair TV for WFIL TV, WNBF-TV and WFBG-TV - Katz for WNHC-TV 

far WLBR-TV 



WORLD'S 





MOVI 




GM • Warner Bros • 20th Century-Fox • RKO 



K VISION'S HOTTEST BUY! %V/ 2 billion worth 
ie BEST entertainment on TV anywhere. . . topping 
j competition in market after market. Prime time 
labilities going fast ! Phone or wire today! 






BASED ON WEEKLY AVERAGE 

SOURCES Telepulse, Brnghamton, Nov. 1956 

Telepulse, Scranlon — WillesBofre. Nov. 1956 
AR8, Alfoono, Nov. 1956 
ARB, New HovenHortlord. Nov 1956 
ARB. Philadelphia. Mor. 1957 



W F I L - T V 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

W N B F - T V 

BINGHAMTON. NEW YORK 

W F B G - T V 

ALTOONA. PENNSYLVANIA 

W N H C -T V 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 

W L B R - T V 

LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



Radio and Televi! 



tangle Publications. In 



WFIL-AM • FM • TV, 
■A. F8G-AM • TV, Alti 



WNBF-AM • FWI • TV. Bnghaml 



WHCB-AM M 



WNHC-AM • Fm • TV. Ne.- WLBR-TV, l.eb= 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



25 MAY A Madison Avenue veteran urges restraint in the current flurry of industry 

sponsor publications inc. backbiting at newspaper tv reviews and comment. He feels that: 

"Charging some critics with incompetence and irresponsibility will only focus attention 
on your own weaknesses. Anyway, in the long run the panning is washed out by the 

praise. That was radio's experience in the late '30's and early '40's." 



Another clue to the height air media have soared in General Motors' firmament : 
Campbell-Ewald has the authority of supervision; but Henry Jaffee, producer of the 

Dinah Shore-Chevrolet series, will be in direct contact throughout with top GM 

management. 

The dickering for tv rights to feature films is beginning to be as imaginative 
as the film fare itself. 

A group had offered to put up two Park Avenue buildings as security for 26 post- 
1950 films. But the film company this week decided the transaction was too elaborate. 



Western agencies continue their trend to tie up with Madison Avenue as a 
means of servicing their air business in the east. 

This week's searcher in New York : Gerald A. Hoeck, radio-tv v.p., of Seattle's Miller, 
Mackay, Hoeck & Hartung, which spends around $120,000 on spots for the Bardahl oil 
additive in the New York metropolitan area. 



Much to their surprise, three radio stations this week had the rug yanked out 
from under them by the woman ad manager of a firm which spends $2 million 
a year on air media. 

What triggered her action was this: A fourth station, also handled by the same 
rep, had got into a personal hassle with her over delinquent payments. 

After the wholesale cancellation, the rep tried to rescue the innocent trio — but to no 
avail. 

Every dynamic field has its departed "legendary" figures — people who pioneered, 
had colorful personalities, and became topics of mellow reminiscence. 

A check around the business evokes these names that might come under the "legendary" 
classification in radio: 

John Shepard IH, founder of the Yankee Network, who quoted the scriptures in 
quitting CBS and in return was wired by William Paley: "The Lord is our shepherd; we 
shall not want." 

L. B. Wilson, the sardonically witty founder of WCKY, Covington, who counselled 
many a neophite to success in the industry. 

M. H. (Deke) Aylesworth, NBC's first president, who recruited the weight and pres- 
tige of giant advertisers to the medium. 

Scott Howe Bowen, who as a broker and general station rep, did a similar job for 
spot. 

Danny Danker, JWT v.p., who crashed the Hollywood name barrier for radio. 

Ouiiin Ryan, the WGN, Chicago, announcer-manager, whose many firsts in special 
events and other programing gave vitality and imagination to radio. 

• 
84 sponsor • 25 may 1957 




// 



She was watching WGN-T^ al noon along with 131.8 ther boys and 

girls). She >% a~ thrilled l>\ the Lunch time Little Hieatre, designed l>\ 
WGN-TV to gel "(.II ["reactions Nielsen, March, L957, I •."• 

Slu- had her mother buj the sponsor's product. 

That's whj Top Drawer Advertisers use WGN-TV. 

I el our specialists lill yon in on some exciting case histories, dia uss j "ur 
>.ilr~ problems and advise n < >i i on currenl availability -. 

WGN-TV 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales with 



CHANNEL 9-CHICAGO 



SPONSOR • 25 may 1957 



85 



BARTERED TIME 

I Continued from page 35 i 

with a line of advertisers waiting to 
get on it. isn't goin» to !>r exchanging 
its valuable time for film, knowing that 
this time will be sold at cut rate. 

7. You can't count on a renewal, if 
you're satisfied. Each barter sale is a 
"once-in-a-lifetime" deal, not renew- 
able after the year or run of contract 
since it hinges upon a particular syndi- 
cator making a specific exchange with 
a particular station. Once that sta- 
tion has paid up in time for the film 
property, there's no reason to be sure 
that it will trade off any more of its 
time for film. 

Hence it's more difficult to maintain 
a continuous schedule after termina- 
tion of a barter contract than on rate 
card spot schedules. 

Despite the drawbacks, a barter- 
discount purchase does offer net ad- 
vantages to many advertisers, or they 
would obviously not be buying or con- 
sidering the buy. 

However, as Les Persky, president of 
Product Services, says: "Barter can 
never replace spot buying. It can only 
be a marginal operation. Through it, 
we're reducing the inequities of the 



present distribution pattern, where a 
major advertiser controls the Bhelf 
space and the other gu\ can't afford 
sufficient advertising to fight him. 

Persky says he hopes barter will not 
siphon off established spot ad\ ci tix-i >. 
and that the value of barter will con- 
tinue only so long as it doesn't become 
too widespread, or used by giants like 
Lever, Colgate or P&G. 

"We think it's ideal for the new- 
comer to tv," he told SPONSOR. "For 
instance, we're planning to introduce a 
new cigarette brand for a major adver- 
tiser through such bulk discount sched- 
ules." 

Not only did Persky sign a contract 
at sponsor's presstime for various film 
properties worth over $8 million, ac- 
cording to him, but he plans another 
step. "We've just commissioned an in- 
dependent film producer to make a 
half-hour adventure series for us which 
we'll use strictly for barter. The show 
is being financed by sponsors for its 
first-run, but we expect to get five 
years of timebuying power out of it as 
well." 

There's less than unanimous enthusi- 
asm throughout the tv and advertising 
industry today about the spread of bar- 
ter deals. In fact, even those whore 



BEST SHOIOF.Wlf^R 



1 V 



v>S 



tip& 



"I like the idea of a 

publication that has all 

the basic data on tv and 

radio exactly when and 

how we need it most. 

Thai description fits Fall 

Facts Basics to a 'T '." 

Lou T. Fischer 

i ice-pres., 

Dancer-Fitzgerald -Sam pie. 
Inc., New York 



|S1 USE 20 <M\X 






engaged in such exchanges frequently 
point out barter ma) easily backfire. 

Here are the advantages and dis- 
advantages of barter to the syndica- 
tors, stations, agencies and reps: 

Syndicators: Essential!), barter is 
the outgrowth of increasing film inven- 
tory both from the avalanche of fea- 
ture libraries and through the accu- 
mulation of syndicated product. As 
more and more new shows become 
available for syndication, the third and 
fourth runs of old product depreciates 
in value. While the individual s\ndi- 
cator might make more on his product 
when it is paid for in cash, he'd just as 
soon make something on barter than 
have the old product lying around. 

That isn't to say that only well-worn 
film is being put up for barter. On the 
contrary, each barter package general- 
ly includes some top properties as well, 
but these are in the minority as are 
Class "A" announcements on the sta- 
tion's side of the deal. 

Different syndicators make different 
barter arrangements and frequently in- 
dividual deals of one syndicator differ 
from each other. However, it's a fair 
estimate to say that virtually every dis- 
tributor who has feature film libraries 
is doing some bartering. 

MCA TV, for instance, is giving sta- 
tions some of its programing in return 
for a 50-50 share in all the participa- 
tions that the station sells after the first 
national client provided by MCA TV. 
This barter, however, is strictly on rate 
card, according to agencies now con- 
sidering such packages. 

NTA Executive V.P. Ollie I ngei 
says: "The syndicator who can afford 
to think in long-range terms and not 
barter, is better off. Do I think bar- 
ter is a good way to do business? No. 
Do I think it will be done? ProbabK. 
Will we do it? Maybe. Do we want 
to? No." 

His views generally sum up the reac- 
tion of the syndicators. In many ways, 
they feel they're being seduced into 
barter virtually against their will. 

"That's where we can help the s\ n- 
dicator by acting as their 'reps,' " says 
Time Merchants" Dick Rosenblatt 
"The syndicator's like a banker accu- 
mulating time, but his risk is great 
especially on a short-term deal. W e 
help him unload this time." 

Stations: The situation is not too 
different for the stations than it is for 
the syndicators. Stations that couldn't 
afford film programing the\ need if 



SI'OVMIK 



25 may 1957 






the) had to pa) cash, can acquire it 
through bartei deals. 

\- the president "I .1 majoi rep In m 
told sponsor: "Of course, we're "p- 
posed i" bai tei on principle. Bui I 1 e 
^oi iii admil it it's .1 god-send to 
some of our stations. Vfter all, tin- 
film product they're getting i- increas- 
ing 1 1 1< - value of Bome of theii time !»■- 
riods and thereb) attracting othei na- 
tional advertisers al the card rate." 

Mostly, the reps are \ iolenth op- 
posed to barter even in those instances 
where the) collecl commission on the 
bartered-time galea through exclusive 
contracts with their stations, ["heir 
main concern is the long-rang effect <>f 
bartei deals 011 the station's ie|>utahil- 
it\ ami the sound economic base of the 
t\ industry. 

Said the president of another large 
rep firm: "I nfortunatel) we can't do 
anything but advise our stations 
against barter. I think if- reducing 
tin- business to the laws ol the jungle. 
Furthermore, in a barter both |>arties 
are trying to put something over on 
each other. It's simp!) not good busi- 
ness. The station? don't seem to realize 
that they're actuall) selling against 
themseh es." 

SRA, while considerabl) less than 

enthusiastic about the Bpread of bar- 
ter, is relying on its members t" advise 
-tat ions against barter. There ina\ 
eventually be action In other trade as- 
-o< iations or b\ the Government, al- 
though no one has concluded that bar- 
ter has any illegal aspect to it. 

W hen- station-agenc) relations are 
concerned, barter sale- mighl be con-' 
sidered a violation of the 1 \"s contract 
which provides that a station must not 
discriminate in price between adver- 
tisers. But then, it isn't the station 
that's setting the price for the bartered 
announcement-. 

It's conceivable, though it mighl be 
difficult to pin down, that -nine -vndi- 
cators and stations have found a tax 
an«Ie that makes baiter even more .it- 
tractive to them. 

for instance, theoretically, when a 
Byndicator trades S3 million worth ol 
film for $3 million worth of time 
there's no need for declaring an\ in- 
come, since the two product- ex- 
changed cancel each other out. 

Its assumed that the $3 million in 
each case is an inflated figure. — the 
Byndicator will quote a top price on 
his product for barter, and the station 
manager will quote card rate on the 
time he s giving in exchange. I bus 



both enlei the i\i li.in ■•■■ il |3 million 

Howe> ei . the syndicatoi t hen sella 
this $3-million- worth ol tim foi -I i 
million, lb- ha- therefore on 1 

-old |3 million woi th of film l"i Onl) 

.1 - 1 . 1 million return, and show - a loss 
ol 11.5 million. Mm -.one applies t' i 
the station. 

Igencies: There are several reasons 
wh) agenc) media people aren 1 too 
happ) about bartei . < me reason i- the 
fad that the) have little control <>\ ei ■ > 

barter bin. tlm- in effect, bin a pig in 

a poke, and can't exercise then -kill .1- 
buyers. 

Secondl) . the) aren't happ) partii - 
ularl) if their im olvemenl in a bait 1 
Inn become- public because the reps 
aie generall) opposed t" bartei . Sin< e 

the individual linielmver depends upon 

the goodwill of rep- in clearing ^ I 

time loi hi- client, the buyei doesn't 
want to cause friction. 

^genC) management on the H hole 

doesn't always look favorabl) on bai- 
ter, though -oine are forced into such 

deals because their client- request that 
the) investigate am bin that seems 
economical. But quite often in the 
past, barter bin- were made directl) 
b\ the client with either the syndical 'i 

or the -\ ndicator - agent, and thus not 
commissionable. 



If we'd pan I 1 ,n ..n 

buj ii would hav< ' it- 

is a ba 
told or candid I 01 

1 strain on oui • 
hip with il.. d so we 

don I v. nit lo |, ill. Iii 1/. il too 

A'- p lie itural thai th 
reps would be opposed to bartei on 

I I llll ip|( \ " 

1 utting, in. I id ii - h hat bartei an ounta 
to. huii- the produt t thai I !•■ 

-■•Il and ma! es il toughei to tell ami 
then prod u< 1 1- the ■, ..f the 

station and the t alue "I ii- 1 1 

I hi thei mor< I spon- 

son 1 generall) behind carefully « I 
doors) thai the film prodm t theii 
lion- gol "ii l.aiii 1 deals "nol 
won 1 do an) thing to boost the 1 due 
of their time and programing lineup, 
but will drive \ iewei - aw 

Essential!) . most reps agri e thai th<- 
stations are the ke\ to the futun 
bai tei . "'If advertisers hud it an ■ 
nomic bus . the) d be nuts to fori 
it." on.- rep told sponsor, freel) ex- 
pressing the s iews of the majoi it > . 
"It's up to the stations to es aluate 
these bartei deals with an eye to the 
future and to what they're doing to the 
value of theii late 1 .ml. It's < leai l\ up 
to stations to refuse these deals.* 1 ^ 



it's KSAN in San Francisco A J 

PROVEN MOST POPULAR WITH NEGRO LISTENERS 
YEAR AFTER YEAR* ,•*..,.,..„, 


SlWilkff 


t .-'* t ***♦. /~^ — *c 

^"/\ \ Sk 4aV »iC"MOND 

l^fe. ^P S*N1 ■ V 1 ^^^ \ X^^NIBBBBB a 1 » u r n a 


[J/ Goes 
n \ Where 


Is Your 
Best Buy... 
Because 


O ^W " 


rjril a 




fc\ Negro 
U / Market 


IM: 1 


Goes Where 
280,000 

11 


\ SAN JOSI ^B 


Nvjs! 


111 ' 111 


\ ""• *" 


Listeners 
Are. 

C( 
WRIT 

1111 MARI 


for specific proof of all KSAN claims to fame, 
intact Stars National, Tracy Moore, or 

E, WIRE, PHONE KSAN 

JET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA. MA Mill 



SPONSOR 



2.S may 1957 






WAY OUT 
I FRONT! 




HOVERS 



HUNTlT 



THE 
GTON-CHARL 
MARKET 



ESTON 



NIELSEN:NCS #2 1956 



► O/ PENETRATION OF COUNTIES 



Oy PEI 
/o IN 



COVERAGE 



WSAZ-TV 



21 



*ORE THAN 75°,, AC 



COVERAGE COUNTIES 



MORE THAN 50% C £? 
COVERAGE COUNTIES JQ 



E 



TOTAL COUNTIES /TO 
COVERAGE *■>' 



STA 



21 



30 



STA.j 

C < 



15: 



22: 




ARB: 8 out of TOP 12 

"February 195 7 




HU/STINGTON-CHARLESTOM, W. VA. 

XCT.B-O. HBTWOSXS 

Affiliated with Radio Stations 

WSAZ, Huntington & WKAZ. Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 

Represented by The Katz Agency 



;:;; 



Reps at work 




Harry Smart, Blair-TV, Chicago, points out that "not only are 
Chicago reps in more severe Ultra-market competition, hut we are 
in much more vigorous competition with other media. particular!) 
network radio and tv." He notes that hack in 1955 many clients 
were forced to buy marginal time at relatively high rates because 
there were few stations, thus fewer 
availabilities. Some of these ad- 
vertisers left spot tv and now have 
to be re-educated that the medium 
now has good availabilities in all 
time classifications. "As in other 
major markets." Harry says, 
"Chicago reps are concentrating 
on daytime spot. Better research 
techniques have given us a better 
picture of daytime viewing and we 
feel it offers the greatest oppor- 
tunities for the advertiser. Re- 
cently, one of the country's major advertisers tested da\time spot 
tv in a few selected markets and was amazed at the low cost, impact 
and results. Back a year ago or so. davtime advertisers were de- 
lighted with a cost-per-l.OOO's under $1.50; today it's more the noun 
for advertisers to shoot for cost-per-l.OOO's under SI. 00 when bu\ing 
this time. Thus, more advertisers are being sold on all-hours t\. 



Paul R. Weeks, vice president and partner of H-R Representatives, 
Inc.. New York, comments: "With all the attention given to con- 
centrations of population in •metropolitan areas, some buyers are 
diverted from highly important farm markets. Rural areas have 
high spendable incomes and large unit purchases are characteristic. 

as farm families purchase com- 
modities and supplies in truck load 
lots. Population is more scattered 
in rural sections, and the people 
don't form a 'metropolitan area" 
b\ census definition, but many a 
radio station regularly serves more 
families in its area than exist in 
some of the first hundred metro- 
politan markets. Farm radio is by- 
far the best medium to reach this 
strewn out market. Radio has the 
ear of the farmers. It has im- 
mediacy and is relied upon for vital news and information. The 
noon farm reports tell him what he will bring to market tomorrow : 
the road reports will let him know if he can get there. The storm 
report gets to him in advance of the hail; he isn't dependent on a 
newspaper deliver) bo) riding a bicycle. Farm radio is economical. 
You can reach this important segment without waste circulation. 




SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



M. 




ARE YOU 

HALF-COVERED 



IN 
NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET? 



MERCHANDISE OFFER PROVES 

KOLN-TV PULLING POWER! 

Last January. Goocb Milling Companj made identical 
offers of a Cake Decorator Sel over a number of T\ 
stations in the Nebraska-Kansas-Iowa area. The tremen- 
dous palling power <>f KOLN-TV was clearl) demon- 
strated — securing the greatest number of orders at a 
considerably lower cost per order than an) other Btation. 

CAKE SETS ORDERED AS OF FEBRUARY 23, 1957 



Station 


Cake Sets 
Ordered 


Station 


Cake Sets 
Ordered 


KOLN-TV 
Station B 
Station C 
Station D 


2,924 
1,462 
1,420 
1,292 


Station E 
Station F 
Station G 


1,184 
783 
512 



II ith the same offer and same time allotment. k()l.\-ll 
pulled twice as many orders as the next best station! 



WKZO TV — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEFFM — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
KOLN TV — LINCOLN NEBRASKA 

Aiioc A'ti - Hi 
WmBD RADIO — PEORIA ILLINOIS 





Have you noticed how much the Nielsen 
NCS No. 2 has expanded Lincoln-land? 




KOjLiN"! \ covers Lincoln-Land .1 rich 69 < tuntj area 
with I'M. Till" TV homes! 

Lincoln-Land has i2 ( )<>.:2(iir families and KOI \ I \ 1- their 
T\ Btation. This import. mi markel i- .1- independent ol 
Omaha as Syracuse is <>f Rochester <>r Hartford is <>i 
Pros idence ! 

Latest \\\\\. Telepulse and Videode* Bnrveya ill show 
KOLN-TV dominates the Lincoln-Land audieno 

Lei \very-Knodel ^i\<- you the whole storj 011 Kni VI \. 
the Official CBS-ABC Outlel for South Central Nebraska 

and Northern Kansas. 

*See Nielsen NCS No 2 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 

KOLN-TV 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND —NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 
Wery-Knodel, Inc.. Exclusive National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



25 \m L957 



89 




A / 



KANV is 
Shreveport's 

ONLY 

ALL j 

NEGRO 

PROGRAM 

STATION! 

That's why KANV is 
THE station to use to 
reach this richer-than- 
average Negro market. 
Our experienced staff 
knows its audience and is 
ready to help with your 
sales problems at the 
local level. KANV rates 
are low and results are 
high! 

GET 
THE 
PROOF! 

It's yours for the asking. 

Write, call or wire the KANV 
Representative in your area — NOW! 





90 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 







Charles C. "Chuck" Woodard, Jr. has 

joined the Westinghouse Broadcasting Co. 

as administrative assistant to the president, 

Donald H. McGannon. Woodard's varied 

experience in administration and the busi- 

^fy — 77 '"'" "'*''' "' network and station operations 

^^^^"^^^^ i- expected to be "I considerable value 

Ik jtflfek particular]) at this time when WB< 

adding executive depth to its expanding 
business operations. This expansion includes increased sales (first 
quarter of 1957 was about 20 f 7 higher than the previous year I and 
the recent purchase of WAAM-TV, Baltimore. Woodard comes to 
Westinghouse from CBS TV. He joined the network in Hollywood 
in 1950 and transferred to New York in 1953. Most recentlv he 
has been handling business and legal problems of network program- 
ing, local station operation, and film syndication activities at CBS. 

Sherwood Dodge, former vice president 
and national marketing director at Foote. 
Cone & Belding, has joined Fletcher D. 
Richards, Inc., as executive vice president 
and a director of the agency. Dodge will 
assume his new responsibilities on 1 June. 
He has been associated with FCB since 
1938. holding many posts including those 
of: research and marketing director, ac- 
count supervisor and a member of the plans board. Dodge also has 
been very active in extra-curricular advertising affairs and currently 
is, among other things, a member of the media relations committee 
of the 4A's and also a director and member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Advertising Research Foundation. Fletcher D. Richards' 
present interest in air media includes the I . S. Rubber sponsorship 
of Navy Log on ABC TV, just renewed for the 1957-58 season. 

Jack McCrew has been named station 
manager for KPRC and KPRC-TY. Hous- 
ton, according to a recent announcement 
made by Jack Harris, vice president and 

1^" *n : mdl general manager of the stations. McGrew 
^^ is a 27-year broadcasting veteran and has 

^JP spent over 20 of those years at KPRC. He 

started in the industry as an announcer for 
KFDM. Beaumont. Tex., in 1930. In 1936 
he joined KPRC also as an announcer. A vear later he was made 
program director and in 1947 was named assistant manager and 
national sales manager for the radio operation. In 1951 he be- 
came assistant manager and national sales manager for both the 
radio and television stations and held this position until his current 
appointment. McGrew will continue to serve as national sales man- 
ager along with assuming his new duties as station manager. 



sponsor • 25 may 1957 








court 



purchasing 
agent 




SPONSOR 



25 may 1957 



91 



SPONSOR 



Spot radio's insecure triumph 

Jm>1 two years ago when spot radio experienced its second 
straight year of hillings decline, there were only a few in the 
industr) who contended publicly that spot radio would come 
hack strong. Having been among this small hand of opti- 
mists, SPONSOR takes a certain measure of pride in the fact 
that figures newly released by SRA for the first quarter of 
1957 show that spot radio skyrocketed by 40.5% over 1956. 

But we aren't ready to retire from tlie field of prediction. 
We are confident now, as we were two years ago, that spot 
radio has undreamed of potential. 

The present triumph of national spot radio, however, rests 
on an insecure foundation. Most of its progress has come in 
the sale of "prime time" — 7-10 a.m. and 4-7 p.m. Spot ra- 
dio is laden with commercials during these hours, largely 
barren otherwise. 

This makes no sense. Tremendous audiences often equal- 
ing those of "prime time," are going to waste so far as na- 
tional sponsors are concerned. To continue its growth, spot 
radio must now r sell its fallow time with hard-hitting, dra- 
matically-documented presentations like those responsible for 
its great progress of the past two years. Not to do so is to 
risk further over-congestion and advertiser discontent. 

We predict the industry, including the station representa- 
tives, RAB and individual stations, will successfully meet 
this challenge. For the alert advertiser, the implications are 
clear: Stake out \ our claim in nighttime spot radio today. 

Promotion shark at work 

This stunt proved that a 
station will stop at nothing 
to dramatize itself. It also 
proves that radio station op- 
eration is the best training 
available for putting your 
head in a shark's mouth. 
The man in the picture is 
Geoff Stirling, president of 
CJON. Newfoundland. 







THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Ao one who buys or 

sells tv time can afford to stand aloof from the 
question of fee vs. free tv. Fee tv will seriously 
damage ti as we know it. Tell your congress- 
man how yon stand on fee tv; tell him why. 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Fifi: A candy store chain in New 
^ ork City is giving its customers a 
chance to win Fifi. "a genuine cream 
giving Jersey cow." The boy who 
dreamed up this practical prize would 
make a fine station promotion man. 

Calypso: Now they've gone and taken 
"Imager) Transfer"" radio concept and 
written it into a new calypso song 
called "Pretty, Pretty Image."' // it 
sets a trend, we may soon have a 
motivation research calypso titled "All 
Day, All Night, Motivation" and per- 
haps even "The Adman's Five O'Clock 
Blues Calypso." 

Lucky: For Howard Ward, manager 
of WWBG, Bowling Green. O.. trou- 
bles come not single spy but in bat- 
talions. First, a flood inundated the 
station. Just when it was pumped dry, 
the twin tower blew over. Ward rigged 
up an antenna to an observation bal- 
loon, only someone shot it down. So 
he reinflated it. sent it aloft again. 
It then broke loose and sailed a\sa\. 

Competitive: A San Mateo. Calif., 
theater manager distributed permits 
entitling "bearer to leave vour tv set 
for 2!/2 hours tonite to see 'Funn\ 
Face' because here is one vou can't 
see on tv until 1963." We'll wait. 

Debut: WBAL-TY. Baltimore boasts 
the first televised and recorded piano 
recital by a chimpanzee. Tv is build- 
ing a real talent pool. 

Huh? From N.Y Times — "The present 
show, titled Caesar's Hour, began 
in September. 1954. It is televised on 
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m." 
Ao wonder he's quitting! 

Upping the ante: Lourenco Marques 
Radio. Johannesburg, S.A., begins a 
new show. The Sky's the Limit. The\ 
describe it as "a quiz programme with 
no limit in prize money." Xothing 
wrong with the British economy. 



Throes: I he announcement of his 
daughter's birth, designed b\ I'liil 
Franznick. SPONSOR art director, i- 
a booklet of 10 stop-motion photos of 
an ash tray. The first pic shows a sin- 
gle match in clean tray, then cigaretti 
butts and matches gradually piled up. 
Final page shows ashtray with only a 
burning cigar and a single match in it. 
Sort of a short, short picture story. 



CHECK WTCN... where Bid thini happening! 




Top sports station in sports-minded market! 

And in 3 out of 4 years, WTCN Sports Director Frank Beutel named top 
Twin Cities Sportscaster! He and his staff broadcast play-by-play reports of 
Minneapolis Millers Baseball, University of Minnesota football- 
basketball— hockey— and baseball, golf tournaments, and professional boxing . . . 
for year-round sports programming, more sports than any other Twin Cities station! 
Check your Katz representative today for ratings and availabiliti 



WTC 




MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL 



5000 WATTS ABC 1280 Kc 



Represented nationally by Katz Agency, Inc. Affiliated with WFDF. Flint. WOOD AM & TV. Grand Rop.di WFBM AM t TV, Indianopolu 





7/ // 



Kansas City 



a few 





but most 
people watch 

KCMO-TV 

Again, the facts: More quarter-hour 
firsts* according to Pulse— February 
1-7, 1 957— over 3 times as many as 
the other two stations combined. 

*Quarter-Hour Firsts 

KCMO-TV-310 
Station B - 62 
Station C - 33 




KCMO-TV 
WHEN-TV 
KPHO-TV 
WOW-TV 



Kansas City 

Syracuse 

Phoenix 

Omaha 



channel 5 
channel 8 
channel 5 
channel 6 






Joe Hartenbower, General Mgr. 
Sid Tremble, Commercial Mgr. 
Represented nationally by Katz Agency 

KCMO-TV one of Mere 

dith's Big -l all-family stations 






e 



Meredith Stations Are Affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 




HT1C I r>4 

UOCKFi 



1 JUNK 1*8 
40i ■ copytflO a y*a 



IEW YOMK 



PO 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS US 



- CH. 



2 GREEN BAY 



ES PERSONA! SERVICE TO tfce Lund, oj Mi£fe & Xwuu| ! 




MALL CITIES & BIG FARMS...360,000 FAMILIES 



CHIN t*T 




INEVITABLE: 
A NIGHT RADIO 
COMEBACK 



In the n'\i 


month* 


-(•MM 


client 


will 


III. ike 


adve 


iti-in^ 


ln.t il 


1 1 in - 


with 


a nigh 


i spol 


i adio 


!in\ ol size. 




- vrh) 


llii- 


- now 


in the i ard* 


Page 


31 









A marketing 
man's dream 
product 



Page 34 



Fall network 
tv lineup with 
new show costs 



Page 38 



Campbell's new 
ad team two 
years later 



Page 41 





PHOTO BY DEL WILLIAMSON 



More than 180,000 tons of primary aluminum a year 
will soon roll off the lines here at the Olin-Revere Metals 
Corp. site, 23 miles south of Wheeling. This is just part 
of the $450-million Wheeling-Upper Ohio Valley expan- 
sion. The growth of this area is fabulous, but no more 
so than the popularity of "WTRF-TV, leader by a wide 
margin in every accredited audience survey made in 
this area. So keep your eyes on this market — just as 
everyone in this market is keeping his eyes on WTRF-TV. 




For availabilities and complete 

coverage information — Cal 

Hollingbery, Bob Ferguson, 

VP and General Manager, 

or Needham Smith, 

Sales Manager, 

Cedar 2-7777. 



reaching a market that's reaching 




316,000 watts 

Equipped for network color 



new importance! 




more women listen to 
WPEN'S 950 CLUB 



than any other program 



in Philadelphia a a a 



A 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY GILL PERNA. INC.. \ ■ .. York, Ch IgO Los I . 



SPONSOR • 1 JUNE 1957 



1 June 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 22 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Who will make the big night radio breakthrough? 

31 Within the nexl few months, if- inevitable some client will make ad- 
vertising headlines with a night spot radio buy of size. Here is why 

Marketing man's dream 

34- Max Factor's new Curl Control is what every marketing man would like 
to have: a completely new product with a big tv budget to back it up 

The fall network tv lineup 

33 Charted here, all the shows and sponsors which are now set for a fall 
start, together with costs of the new shows, show type percentages 

Campbell's new advertising team two years later 

41 Product manager system which revolutionized management approach 
has proved itself. Here's how big tv-radio decisions are made today 

Today's net radio sponsors 

48 A network-by-network list of network radio's advertisers this month 
with the amount of time purchased and brands now using the medium 



FEATURES 

28 49th and Madison 

59 New and Renew 

GO News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

SO Radio Results 

76 Reps at Work 

54 Sponsor Asks 

18 Sponsor Backstage 



72 Sponsor Hears 

9 Sponsor-Scope 
80 Sponsor Speaks 
56 Spot Buys 
80 Ten Second Spots 
14 Timebuyers at Work 
78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 
69 Washington Week 
24 Women's Week 



In Upcoming Issues 

Why Sinclair buys 10,000 six-second spots a week 

SPONSOR estimates Sinclair is today spending $1.5 million annualh for 
spot radio short-shorts to cover its huge marketing area economically 

Tv basics/June 

June Comparagraph will feature programing costs, how competing clients 
compare, alphabetical program index and spot television basics 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

Miles David 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Betty Van Arsdel 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
VP— Advertising Director 

Arnold Alpert 

New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Production Manager 

Jean L. Engel 

Advertising Staff 

Jane E. Perry 

George Becker 

Ginger Dixon 

Administrative Coordinator 

Catherine Scott Rose 

Administrative Staff 

M. Therese McHugh 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Betty Rosenfeld 

Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



DEE! 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
<49fh & Madisen) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
161 E. Grand Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $10 a year. Canada and foreign $11. Sin- 
gle copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 




MOST EYES ARE ON KTHV 

IN ARKANSAS' 



KTHV is seen, heard, and ijets regulai viewing response 
throughout MOST of Arkansas! Please Stud] the mail map 
above. Notice that it includes 62 Arkansas counties — notice 
KTHVs penetration to all six surrounding State borders, with 
mail actually being received from viewers in Mississippi, 
Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas I 

With 316,000 watts on Channel ll and with the tallest antenna 
in the Central South (1756' above average terrain) K.IHV 
sells most of Arkansas. 

Your Branham man lias all the />/';' KTHV facts. Ask him! 




KTHV 



Channel 11 

LITTLE ROCK 
316,000 Watts 



Henry Clay, Executive Vice President B. G. Robertson. General Manager 

AFFILIATED WITH KTHS, LITTLE ROCK AND KWKH, SHREVEPORT 






This 

little pi 

went 
to 

mark 




... thanks to koin rv. And his stock soared Letj n yman\K l Mackay 
of Miller, Mackay, Hoeck and Hartung tell you t Ik real life success story 
oi Bar-S Holiday Ham, a luxun item in search o\ a market. 



r <- 




"Bar-S was virtually unknot n in the Portland, ( Oregon market, and had 
major competition to overcome. We tried various advertising approaches, 
hut none succeeded, until we turned to television, on koin i\. I hen. 

the consumer demand was so marked — and SO immediate that Bai S was 
ahle to increase its distribution widel) . not onlj in Portland but throughout 
the entire \ alley area. As a result, Bar-S enjoyed a health) 60* < sales 
increase in 1956 over 1 955... all the more impressive when you consider 
that it was accomplished in a period o[ slightl) over six months!" 

Unusual? Not at all. Bar-S Holiday Ham is no different from the hundreds 
of other products and services, large and small, which expand their markets 
and create new markets by using one or more o{ the 1 3 telex ision stations 
( and the regional network ) represented by CBS Television Spot Sales. 
Good spot to be in! 

Representing: w< BS i \ New York, \\ bum i \ ( hicago, kn\i Los Vngeles, w< \i i\ Philadelphia, 
u mi-. i\ Washington, WBT\ Charlotte, wbtm Florence, wmbr in lacksonville, km r> Sail 1 .ike ( 
KGUL-tv Galveston-Houston, wxix Milwaukee, koin i\ Portland (Ore i. WH< i Hartford, and the 
CBS. Television Pacific Network 



CBS Telex ision 
Spot Sal 






II50 KC 



GL 9 



O O 




Why 
should 
I buy- 



)!, 



,C . CaU8e Mngs are han 
" ,n e in ihe M . 



And we're 
r sad 



24l 10IIrs 1 , ex P a »ding to 



e ep up. 



love to Buy ^^^ 



Our story: a series of suc- 
cess stories. We believe in 
hard-hitting merchandis- 
ing and Things Happen 
... on 

KFJI! 



Domi^uiied- . . . 



SOUTHERN 



NORTHERN 



OREGON* CALIFORNIA 

* money rnapkeTjS" 

Best Buu 

KLAMATH FALLS, OREGON 

Ask -the Meeker Co. 



5000 W 









I of the week 



he h 



as risen 



w ith 



The news: The appointment of William S. Morgan, Jr., gen- 
eral manager of KLIi . Dallas, as programing vice president of 
the IBC Radio Network, reflects the growing respect for independent 
station personnel as well as the determination of AB-PT to repeat 
in network radio its successful challenge of network tv's leaders. 

The newsmaker: It can be said without fear of successful 
contradiction that before Bill Morgans appointment, those not inti- 
mately familiar with him would not have given him a chance in the 
world of becoming a network radio programing chief. Item: He 
has been in the broadcasting business onl\ five years, came into it 
from insurance. Item: His prime broadcasting background is sales, 
not programing. Item: His only link with web radio programing 
has been as a listener. Item: He is only 38. 

During Morgan s five years in radio, however, 
a speed few can match. His debut 
in radio ran concurrent with the 
debut of KGKO. Dallas. He began 
as sales manager on the new inde- 
pendent and when he left to join 
KLIF two years later he was gen- 
eral manager. He leaves KLIF as 
vice president of the McLendon 
Corp. in addition to being general 
manager of the station. 

These facts were well known to 
new ABC Radio President Robert 
Eastman, a former John Blair \ 
Co. executive, since KLIF was a 
Blair-represented station. Though Morgans contact with network 
operations has been slim, Eastman reasoned that radio programing 
is a matter of skill and execution no matter what the audience. 
Eastman also felt that, with Morgans sales background and the fact 
that programing and sales are so closely linked in local station opera- 
tion, Morgan would bring with him a keen perception of the needs 
of network salesmen. 

Both Eastman and Morgan have made clear that ABC Radio will 
steer clear of recorded music in its new programing plans. But 
Morgan's healthv respect for news coverage la hallmark of the KLIF 
operation) will be brought over into his new job. Moreover, no one 
should be surprised if. once the program plans jell. ABC calls at- 
tention to them with giveaway hypos, a successful gimmick among 
the news-and-music outlets. 

Morgan points out that, even with big prizes, giveaway promotions 
need not he expensive. One of Morgan's giveaways at KLIF in- 
volved a treasure hunt for a $50,000 check hidden in a Coca-Cola 
bottle. It was found hv a plasterer six hours before the deadline 
(after which it would have been worth onl\ $500 i . However, Lloyds 
of London, which hid the bottle, bet it wouldn't be found in time 
and the insurance premium cost KLIF onl\ $6,500. ^ 




tf illiam S. Morgan, Jr. 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 




RRRR 




RRRR 





■III 

RRRR 
RRRR 
RRRR 
RRRR 




KNXT HAS JUST WON ITS 99TH* MAJOR PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD 
OR CITATION IN 48 MONTHS. THIS IS BEYOND QUESTION ONE OF 
THE MOST EXTRAORDINARY RECORDS IN TELEVISION HISTORY. 
KNXT, CHANNEL 2 IN LOS ANGELES, CBS OWNED 

*THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY AWARD ANNOUNCED MAY 6 IKNXTS SECOND IN TWO 
YEARS). FIVE WEEKS EARLIER KNXT WON THE DUPONT FOUNDATION AWARD. THESE 
-LIKE THE PEABODY AWARD WON BY KNXT LAST YEAR AND THE SYLVANIA AWARDS 
WON THIS YEAR AND LAST -ARE AMONG THE MOST COVETED AND MOST MEANING- 
FUL AWARDS IN THE BROADCASTING INDUSTRY FOR PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAMMING. 



SPONSOR 



1 JINK 195' 



— 

n^H 



la 3sj» 



'fcKr-r^™ 1 



WNHC-TV LEADS -DAY AND NIGHT! 

Sign on to sign off, seven days a week, 
WNHC-TV, New Haven-Hartford, 
trounces all competition. In a 14-county 
area covering 896,000 TV homes, 
WNHC-TV delivers average audiences 
210% greater than top New York City 
station; 244% greater than Hartford; 
174% greater than New Britain. 
WNHC-TV nearly triples monthly 
coverage of next Connecticut station, 
delivering all of Connecticut plus 
entire Springfield-Holyoke market 
area. Your Katz man has the facts: 
ARB, Nov. 1956; Nielsen NCS # 2, 1956. 



<^ 



TRIANGLE STATION 



WNHC-TV 

NEW HAVEN-HARTFORD, CONN. 



Channel 8 

ABC-TV -CBS-TV 

Represented by KATZ 



W 



RHe 






operated by : Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton, N. Y. / WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. 
WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, New Haven-Hartford, Conn. / r 



Office, 485 



■TV, Lebanon, Pa. 



New York 17, New York 



■ MB 



ESPECIALLY IN HARTFORD! 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 



Must tignificant ti un<l radio 

newt <>! the week with interpretation 

in depth for but) readert 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



I JUNE 

Copyright l»57 
8P0NSOH PUBLICATIONS INC. 



More than jrou might realize right now. the boon in network i% has Maeted open 
an opportunity for spot telleri tliat looks really bin. This •reek thai riata irai riaible 
mainl) through statistics, hut reps and Mtutinn people quieklj were getting set i<> 
i - 1 1 — 1 1 in. 

This i- tin- situation : 

• Tin* tv networks arc loading up with more sponsored nighttime -how« than .i 
l»ni — 

• Fewer advertisers an* involved, so — 

• There's a potential group of excluded (and experienced) customers t«> l><- 
wooed bj -pot. 

The superficial paradox of big network sales vs. fewer advertisers i- resolved easib when 
you sto|i to consider that the hip fellow- are 1 i taking on more commitments, and 2) adding 
more alternate sponsorships. That puts tin* squeeze on the totem pole. 

Though the network selling season isn't closed oul complete!) ret, the following break- 
down gives a clue to the way trends are shaping up: 



CATEGORY 
Appliances 
Auto 

Auto accessories 
Beverages 
Ciirarettes-Tohaec o 
Drugs-Toiletrie- 
Food Product- 
Soaps-cleansers 
Miscellaneous 

TOTAL 



no. COMPANIES 

-I I K)R 1957-58 

14 

10 

5 

3 

6 
19 
22 

8 
10 

97 



NO. COMI'VMf- 
LAST (>< TOBEH 

15 

9 

7 

5 

6 
■2: 
24 
10 
16 

119 



What happens in the Los Angeles market ina\ or ma\ not be an omen of the trend 
in spot tv, but here are some figures from Rorabaugh Reports that rep* deem sig- 
nificant land why the situation described above is so welcome). 

Total number of tv spots on all seven L \. stations: 

1st quarter, 1957: 647 spots; 1st quarter. 1956: 718 spots; final quarter. 1956: 784 spots. 

(Look for "The hypo spot tv needs" in 15 June sponsor. 1 

When you think of tv pace setters, you automaticall) face Cincinnati or New >. ork and 
bow to P&G or General Foods. Now get set for another one: Revlon. 

At the rate Revlon is picking up network showa, it BOOB could find itaeJf on a 
nighttime par with the traditional giant-. 

Revlon seems set to add an alternate hour of Crisis M'.( FA roster, which 

already consists of all of $64,000 Question and half of $64,000 Challenge, Walter Wmcheu, 
and Guv Mitchell. 

Vnother half-hour show may he spotted on CBS TV. If that happens, Revlon'« 
1957-58 bill will run to around SI 7.5 million. 

Note: Revlon's sales have been so whopping the first quarter of 1957 that it*s 
due to pay a S2 dividend, compared to $1.20 for the final 1056 quarter. 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . 



Judging from reports of feelers, quite a number of upper echelon agency jobs are 
floating around this week. Worth mentioning: 

McCann-Erickson: a post in senior management; BBDO: an assistant marketing di- 
rector: JWT: a marketing man. 

Vick's air media plans for the coming fall have some new twists. 

In conjunction with daytime network tv, Vick contemplates using radio to reach 
the rural and small town market. The likely huy: Mass stations packages, like the 
Keystone Network. 



Without ballyhoo, General Motors' various divisions are piling up millions of 
dollars of billings on CBS Radio. 

GM's total program time per week adds up to 4 hours and 10 minutes per week (com- 
pared to the 4 hours and 40 minutes that Ford has bought on the same network, starting this 
fall). 

The GM buys include shows for such divisions as Frigidaire. Delco, and Pontiac. 

("For a detailed breakdown of GM's network radio purchases, see sponsor's complete 
roster of network radio clients, page 48.) 



Esty's timebuying department is warning stations: Stop nudging the Ballentine tv 
commercials with orange juice and other soft drink blurbs. 

The agency would like a buffer zone of 15 minutes between Ballentine and other 
beverages, but will settle for 10 if it has to. 

An agencv official takes this stand: "You can't blame a client who has sweated for 25 
years to build his business to get irritated at an adjacent commercial telling about the cool- 
ing effect of frozen orange juice." 



This example may be an isolated one, but when WHEC, Rochester, this •week re- 
duced its nighttime rate to 50% of daytime it found a quick customer in Decaf. 

The buy (through D-F-S) was for 40 spots a week. The deal was not tied in with any 
daytime spots. 

The agency's post-buy comment to WHEC's rep, Everett-McKinney : The client 
couldn't resist the favorable price. 

Footnote: WHEC hadn't sold a nighttime national spot in about six years. 






Question: Are the income and other characteristics of the people who listen to a 
network radio show much different from those who tune in disk jockeys? Answer: No — at 
least not on the basis of a pilot study in four cities. 

The source of this information is C. E. Hooper, now engaged in an ambitious 
qualitative survey on radio audience composition. 

Hooper has revamped the questionnaire on which the pilot study was based and plans 
to extend its probe to anywhere from 40 to 100 cities. 

The study may become a part of the firm's regular station ratings' service. 

Will Leonard Goldenson soon name a president for ABC TV? 

sponsor puts a question to Goldenson in the course of interviewing for an upcoming 
article on him. His answer: 

Ollie Trevz. as vp in charge of ABC TV. now has all the power and responsibility he 
would have if ABC TV were a separate corporation (like the recently formed ABC Radio) 
and if be had the title of president. 

(For more on Goldenson's look into ABC's future and his views on the industry at 
large, see the 15 June sponsor.) 

10 SPONSOR • 1 JUNE 1957 




SPONSOR-SCOPE "'nnnued 



\ recurring woe to tin- reps that's lacking up lit now I he haereaaing ten* 

denc) among national advertieere to l>u> al local rate* often with tin- bleating and 
even belp >>f their national agencies. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE this week checked with several agencies whose clients are on i I 
rate buj ing spree and learned : 

1) Mo-i of them don't favor the practice, but sarj thej can'l rerj well talk 
hack when tin- client reminds them that a competitor i- buying In- spot through distributors 
.it local rates. 

2) The usual procedure hi that the diatribntor consnlta the agenej on price and 
schedules For which the agency gets a fee or eommiasion. 

3) Ml paymenta are made through the diatribntor. 

Stations meantime tell the reps: If we don't granl local ratee. our eompetitora *>ill. 



To counter the splurge made by All-State (Sears, Roebuck) and Nation-Wide in policy 

writing, the National Association of Insurance igentfl will Spend around .*!> million 
this fall in network tv. network, and spot radio. 

Doremns, the NATA's agency, told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week thai the independem 
brokers' campaign will (11 plus; the Identity of the \'\1\ seal: (2) remind thai the indepen- 
dent broker serves the best needs of the community; and (3) BUggesl thai onlj personal 
service assures right and adequate coverage. 



Delco, a member of the General Motor* family, will drop it-* share of Wide, 
Wide World next fall and strike off by itself tv-wise. 

Delco's network plan calls for six or eight Bpecials "n CBS TV produced <>n color film 
by Lowell Thomas. Thev will be a sort of combination of Seven Wonders of the World 
and Yon Are There. 



Pre-Christmas buys of nighttime network tv shows continue to snowhoIL 

Latest hatch involves Shaeffer Pen. Polaroid, and Lane Cedar Chest. The -how 
Is NBC TVs Perrv Como. 

Cost of time and talent per shot: $85,000 an estimated 13.50 per-l,000-homea-per-com- 
mercial minute. 



The topside at Bulova appears divided on network tv policy. 

One faction strongly favors longtcrm commitments because of the franchise value. 

At the opposite pole are those who favor network facilities only when special seasonal 
promotions are needed: thev would relv on spot to keep the Bulova name con*tantl\ be- 
fore the consumer. 



Using Nielsen as a source. TvB cites the-e figures to Bhow that the average nighttime 
network program this season got a bigger rating "and audience! than ever. 



PERIOD 


VVG. RATING 


\vr.. NO. HOI 


% \\> i 


Jan.-April 1955 


23.3 


6.356.000 




Jan. -April 1956 




7,532,000 




Jan.-April 1057 




9,086,000 


21 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 H 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



ABC, both radio and tv, this week found new business unusually perky. 

The biggest coup on the tv side was the pickup of around $4 million in billings from 
Kellogg. The deal calls for alternate-week sponsorship of Circus Boy and a 5-5:30 strip for 
reruns of adventure shows like (Lancelot and Buccaneer) . 

Another tv sale was Friday 10-10:30 p.m. alternate weeks to Campbell Soup. 

New ABC Radio business for the past week — which amounted to around $750,000 
net — includes Miller Brewing, Beltone Hearing Aid, Admiral Corp., and C. H. Mussel- 
man. 



CBS Radio meantime has signed a new piece of business from Philip Morris and 
several renewals. 

The latter came from Wrigley (52 weeks of the Pat Buttram Show) and Simoniz fa 
quarter-hour segment of Art Linkletter's House Party). 



Lever Bros.' assumption of the trademarks and marketing responsibility of 
Monsanto's "All" detergent got this two-fold commentary from Madison Avenue marketing 
experts : 

1) Lever now can compete more equally with P&G and Colgate in the mass 
detergent field. 

2) The deal places Lever in a preferred position with one of the country's biggest 
developers of chemical products fa major feather in Lever's cap). 

As a side observation: Monsanto's withdrawal from the distribution of consumer goods 
proves once again that it doesn't pay industrial giants to divert their top manage- 
ment and staff from the basic business of researching and manufacturing. 



Colgate's wholesale personnel shakeup of the past week looks like a real stem- 
to-stern job. 

The exodus is reported to have affected 175 people in market research, development, 
and the chemical laboratorv. 



Latest trend among Hollywood tv producers is to ally themselves with freelance 
live programing firms. 

Screen Gems this week lined itself up with the Henry Jaffe Enterprises, while 
Hal Roach, Jr., is on the lookout for a similar union. 

Where "production values warrant," says Screen Gems, the Jaffe contribution will use 
a blend of live and film production. That's also Roach's intent. 

Roach's plans also include issuing stock so that he can buy a distributing firm and ac- 
quire a producing studio in the east. 

Fabulous talent developer and salesman Tom Rockwell this week turned over much 
of the pressure of running GAC to 44-year-old Larry Kanaga. 

Kanaga, heretofore RCA Victor v.p. and gen. mgr., takes over the presidency from the 
55-year-old Rockwell who moves to the newly created post of board chairman. Rockwell 
intends to continue handling some of his tv accounts. 

A few of the names that Rockwell brought to the air media: Bing Crosby, Ruth Etting, 
Frank Sinatra, the Andrews Sisters, Perry Como. Jo Stafford. Peggy Lee, the Mills Bros.. 
Frankie Laine, Jackie Gleason, Parti Page. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; New 
and Renew, page 59; Spot Buys, page 56; News and Idea Wrap-Up. page 60; Washington 
Week, page 69; sponsor Hears, page 72; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78. 

12 sponsor • 1 JUNE 1957 







HOOPER PULSE TRENDEX 

It *s still una in niuiis in Omaha. All 3 major surveys show KOWH continuing to lead the |>a>-k. 

Latesl (April-Maj Hooper gives KOWH tl Ige all-day, with 32.8 audien 

Latest Omaha Pulse March shows KOWH firsl in the morning, tirst in the afternoon and 
tii-st all day, with a 31.0^5 average daytime audience . . . and with 246 <>ut <>f 264 tirst pi. 
daytime quarter-hours. 

Latesl Omaha Trendex gives KOWH a whopping 10.9$ all-day avi ig 
manding lead both morning and afternoon. 

This is the kind of leadership K< >\VII continues to place at your s 
pasl six years. Call Adam Young Inc., or tali to KOWH General .Man 



KOWH 



aha 



The Storz Stations 




TODD STORZ. 


Today's Radio for Today's Se/I in 


9 


President 

k - - .j 


WDGY WHB WQAM 

Minneapolis-St. Paul Kansas City Miami 

Represented by John Blair & Co. 




KOWH WTIX 

Omaha New Orleans 

Represented by Adam Young Inc. 



SPONSOR • L JUNE 1957 



13 






Edward 




PETRY 

& Company, Inc. 



MEWS! PQtry just 
captured KOBY..: 



KOBY has captured the 
NO. 1 spot in San Francisco! 

KOBY is proud to have a No. 1 national 
representative like Petry telling KOBY's 
tremendous success story. Be sure you 
get the tacts soon on Petry's new king 
size radio buy in San Francisco! You'll 
discover KOBY is the entire Bay Area's 
No 1 independent — March-April Pulse — 
weekdays 6 a.m. -mid. 7.3, Saturdays 7.6, 
Sunday 9.3. March-April Hooper — week- 
days 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 21.3, Saturday 27.9, 
Sunday 34.7. Nie'sen agrees — rates 
KOBY at 20,000 NSI Area Audience 6 
a.m. -mid. KOBY operates full time — 
10,000 watts make it the most powerful 
independent in the nation's 7th largest 
market. See your Petry man pronto! 

KOSI has captured the 
NO. 1 spot in Denver! 

KOSI ratings continue on a fast upswing 
— April-May Hooper — 17.2 a.m., 21.4 
p.m. share; February Pulse 155 all day 
average! Proof KOSI is Denver's fop 
independent station. KOSI's 
5000 watts — full time opera- 
tion combined with its 
high popularity make it 
definitely a basic buy 
in Denver. Represented 
nationally by Forjoe. 

Mid-America 
Broadcasting Co. 

In Greenville Mississippi 
WCVM is No. 1 in Hooper 
& Nielsen 













Timebuyers 
at work 




John Marsick, assistant media director. Kudner Agency, Inc., New 
York, comments: "As one permanentl) engaged in timebuying, I 
cant over-emphasize the importance of reading trade periodical- 
such as sponsor. It's an old axiom in our business that periodicals 
print information before the parties concerned know about it. Be- 
sides disclosing who's doing an bat 
for whom and how much, peri- 
odicals serve as easy-to-read text 
books on air media. Air media is 
an ever-changing business — pro- 
grams come and go (sometimes 
the) go before they come), new 
stations open up. affiliates change, 
etc. All this information the time- 
bin er must know to make intelli- 
gent purchases and the only accu- 
rate source he can turn to is the 
trade journals. In addition, the 
guide books such as sponsor's Fall Facts Basics, Buyers' Guide, 
and Timebuying Basics are necessary tools for all media people, new 
and old in the business. Timebuying Basics alone covers all methods 
of audience measurement, the pitfalls in audience research, qualita- 
tive research, correlating the markets with \our product, the value 
of merchandising, and all phases of network and -pot operation. 



Edward C. Fieri, Jr., BBDO. New York, thinks that spot tv this 
fall will offer greater flexibilitv than at anvtime in the past because 
prime tv availabilities will be easier to obtain. "There are several 
reasons for this, Ed says. "Number one, in multi-channel markets, 
the firm establishment of a three-network structure means that high- 
rated adjacencies will no longer be 
limited to onl\ two networks. 
Number two, the growth and im- 
proved quality of feature films ba- 
made possible effective bin ing in 
fringe time periods. This trend 
should become stronger as more 
post-war films are released. Fea- 
ture films also olfer an opportu- 
nit\ to obtain high-rated minute 
spots. Number three, the major 
programing changes being done 
on all three networks. In some 
areas, prime network adjacencies have been blocked by holders of 
franchise spots. The program changes will offer an opportunity to 
establish new franchises." Ed concludes thai "those who have spots 
adjacent to network programs that will be replaced in the fall, will 
have to decide whether to remain with their current franchises or 
establish new ones and adjust the scheduling for them according ." 




1 I 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 



Talk about 
promoting! 



Radio's 
best on 



*oi 



fO*? 



-«\G># 



^""""'•a*. 



123 on Y»" 



We don't talk about it. We do it! And in spades. Day 
in and out 'round Baltimore we talk up WITH and 
our advertisers. Nobody but nobody is immune 
to it. Even the steeplejack atop City Hall can see our 
giant 1 1 :f:l Z H U>:i M Z W in the heart of town 
and our EBEBH3S& and our mthhhm;m» 
Housewives see them, too, as well as our 

inSHMEHlHS& and our daily 

■ Z 1 4VH JX J 3 ; Wil »>■♦ And when they visit their 
food store any food store, chain or independent- they 
see powerful W-l-T-H E3EB5EH31^ New 
Baltimoreans learn about us right off the bat through 

IVi I Had §EEB *^^ Teen-agers pick up a 
W-l-T-H weekly ■ :ilMiij:im«H»3j:fr on every 
excursion to their record store. Constant 

EHSM2nj>and tl;Mi]«*» flow to the 



«--.«. 



food and drug channels. Promoting? It's our lifeblood 
— and one of the big reasons why W-l-T-H has twice as 
many advertisers as any other Baltimore radio station. 




in Baltimore 



Tom Tinsley President 



R. C. Embry Vice Pres 



National Representatives: Select Station Representatives 

in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington 

Forjoe & Co. in Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta 














fe v- 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 



15 




>w' 





VIEWERS IN JUS 



w 



HIGHWAY 



HIGHWAY 
PATROL 7 

starring 

BRODERICK 

CRAWFORD 




RE 



St 



A* 



CH 



ivjR 



EA^ 



|NC- 






S365*- 



LA* ° F * 1 "' ' 

con^*!^ watiot^ 1 r °, patrol- ^ 






P.esul«- 



Tonal * at persons.. 

29 -° 



i i 



23,^° 




29-0 rt * survey,^'^ 

^rector 






THIS ARB 29.0 IS HIGHER 
RATING FOR THESE SHOWS 

Playhouse 90 27.4 

Bob Cummings 27.4 

Zane Grey Theatre 27.2 

Line Up 27.0 

Life Of Riley 26.6 

Robin Hood 26.5 

Studio One 26.0 

Loretta Young 25.2 

Peoples Choice 25.1 

George Gobel 24.7 

Mr. Adams and Eve 23.1 



THAN THE ARB NATION/ 
(MARCH, 1957): 

Adventures Of Jim Bowie 23 

20th Century Fox 2j 

Lux Video Theatre 2* 

Broken Arrow 21 

Cavalcade Of Sports 21 

Navy Log 21 

Ozzie and Harriet 2C 

Welk's Top Tunes 

Conflict 

Big Story l c . 

Big Surprise IS 



«A««« T 






JAMES W. SEILER*. Dl- « 

RECTOR OF ARB. super- 
vised the compilation of 
the ARB rating facts^in <— 
this ad. This (fata 
proves HPOHWA/ PA 
T R Ot '€ -overwhelming* 
audience appeal. , ' 



MaV ^' 

Ziv *elevl£ Road 
l529 *adiec. 6j0hi o 

ci ncinnat 



Rati2S 



25,8 



THE 



pet? I 
(add 

231 



? \jlSM 



CLOSED BY NATIONAL RATING ANALYSES . . 




?& 




NE WEEK FOR 

PATRO L ! 






95/ 




P ULSt .M 



HI 



■d Theatre 

#>a Hour 

♦ >ert Montgomery Presents 

Hducers Showcase 

Ift TV Theatre 

■ asure Hunt 

Pont Cavalcade Theatre 

Be Service 

Kmy Thomas 

ARB National March 



19.3 
19.3 
19.2 
17.9 
17.8 
17.8 
16.7 
16.0 
15.8 
15 1 
13.5 
12.1 
10.9 

1957 







DR. SYDNEY ROSLOW. 
DIRECTOR OF PULSE. 
INC. directed the tabu- 
lation of the special re- 
port proving that HIGH- 
WAY PATROL is a rec- 
ord-breaking TV series. 





TIME 

AFTER 

TIME... 



ZIV 
SHOWS 



IN CITY 

AFTER 

CITY! 



COLUMBUS 

GEORGIA 

3 county metropolitan area 

USES THE LOCAL 
& NATIONAL FAVORITE 

WRBL 




IN THE NATION 

in per family income 

($7,339.00) 



Rank in the 
Nation 

97th— 



98th— 



Source: 1957 Survey 
of Buying Power 

in population 
—236,800 

in effective 
buying income 
—$379,416,000 



WRBL-TV— first in 310 out of 409 quarter hours- 
March Telepulse. WRBL Radio leads by 55% in 
home delivered — N.C.S. No. 2. 

WRBL 



AM - FM - TV 



COLUMBUS GEORGIA 



CALL HOLLINGBERY CO. 



by Joe Csida 



ponsor 







Tv's'first lO: the clash offcolor 

As the sun set on my last piece I was talking 
about the past 10 years in television — and what 
a fascinating decade it was! In 1946, for ex- 
ample, both RCA and CBS were starting their 
big pushes on the all-electronic and the mechani- 
cal color tv systems respectively. 

Four \ears later on 16 October 1950 the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission approved 
CBS color, and set 20 November as the starting 
date for its commercial introduction. It took. RCA just five da\ s to 
block, the FCC decision. On 23 October General Sarnoff and com- 
pany filed suit in the Federal District Court in Chicago seeking a 
temporary injunction against the FCC's decision, pending eventual 
determination of a suit for a permanent injunction. 

Christmas of that year, the Federal District Court dismissed the 
RCA complaint but banned commercial operation of CBS color, 
pending a Supreme Court decision on the matter. To condense an 
epic story, RCA, of course eventual!) won the battle. FCC approved 
its all-electronic, compatible color system and the CBS mechanical 
system was discarded forevermore. 

It had been a tense and deadly struggle, with millions of dollars 
worth of basic patent royalties at stake, among other considerations. 
Fundamentally the RCA victory belonged to the great research engi- 
neers and scientists operating out of the David Sarnoff Laboratories 
in Princeton. N. J. But the Radio Corp. legal eagles could take a 
deep bow too. 

RCA's victory was costly 

It is estimated, however, that its color tv push in the vear 1956 
represented a dead loss (if an investment can be thus termed) of 
close to $7,000,000 to RCA, and the end is not yet in sight. So 
maybe there are moments when Bill Paley, Frank Stanton et al 
aren't too unhappv about having lost that particular bout. 

In some quarters it was said that CBS was foolish to take on the 
RCA giant in the color battle in the first place, but it doesn't always 
follow that a smaller company can't win an occasional important 
battle from a larger firm. I remember as though it were yesterday, 
although it was actually 7 December 1953, when General Sarnoff ad- 
dressed a small group at the aforementioned Princeton Laboratories. 
The General discussed tv tape among other things. The RCA scien- 
tists, he said, had completely tested and confirmed all the principle 
elements of both black-and-white and color tv tape. 

It would be about two years, Sarnoff opined, before t\ tape would 
be introduced to the commercial market. He didn't miss the timing 
li\ much. It was just about two and a half years, in April of 1956, 
at the NARTB Convention in Chicago that tv recorders were intro- 
duced to the commercial market. But. as you know, not b) RCA, 
but by comparati\el\ small Vmpex. 

So successful was Vmpex's introduction of the tv tape recorder 



L8 



SPONSOK 



1 JUNE 195' 




© © <D 



KPTV • PORTLAND hVHF 

Channel 12 • nbc Tele 



vision 







i 



SPONSOR • 1 .11 m: 1957 



KPTV Oregon's first television station 
and the world's first commercial UHF 
station now gives you a new, VHF 
Channel 12 in the Portland market. When 
you buy KPTV Channel 12, you get four 
exclusive "plusses" offered by no other 
Portland TV station: (1) Top-rated NBC 
shows and stars; (2) The best local shows 
and film packages of two stations (KPTV 
merged with KLOR, the former Channel 
12); (3) Almost 5 years of viewer loyalty 
to Oregon's first TV station; (4) Proven 
results for hundreds of advertisers. Be sure 
the bright, new KPTV, Channel 12 is on 
your advertising schedule. 



KPTV 



Channel 

12 

Portland, Oregon 

NBC Television 



Represented Nationally by George P. HoiUnberry Co. 



19 



KORl audience 
\n Lansing 

20 to 1 P<w er 



5000 



iivirt 



VII Ml* 



Feb ^Nlar. '57 Hooper 

In Lansing Shows 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



7 -00 a.m.— 
\l noon 

\l noon— 
6.00 p.m- 



YilLS Station B 

58.9 I ^ 6 



54.6 



32.7 



UHSIHG 

richigm* i 




M ore listeners than 

all other stations 

heard in 
Lansing combined 

♦Jan. tnru Mar. average 
C. t. Hooper, >nc. 



m . ,>>as sports 
music ^ J 



Represented Nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 



Sponsor backstage continued . . 



that the firm wrote over $4 million worth of business on the equip- 
ment righl at the convention. \n<l among the buyers was RCA's 
National Broadcasting Co. So where CBS failed to take the Radio 
Corp's measure in color television, \mpex took it handily in the tv 
tape field. 

Other interesting facets of the \ ideo scene shine out in one's niein- 
ory today. It was only recently that Sid Caesar severed his relation- 
ship with NBC. Apparently the comic will now he going into 
the film business with a gentleman named Sylvester (Pat I Weaver, 
who also left NBC not too long ago. 

Well, it was 1949 when these two fellows were starting on the 
paths, which today seem to be bringing them together. In Januarv 
of that year Caesar starred in the first full hour musicals ever done 
on television. It was a show called the Friday Night Frolic, spon- 
sored by Admiral on the combined NBC and DuMont networks. 
Working with Sid was Imogene Coca and Marge and Cower 
Champion. 

In Julv of that \ear Pal Weaver left Young & Rubicam to go to 
NBC as vice president in charge of television. It was only four vears 
later in March of 1953 that Pat announced his plans for the first of 
the 90-minute spectaculars. And just about another three \ears be- 
fore he was through at NBC. It will be interesting to see what the 
next decade will bring Pat and Sid. 

Longevity may be in approaeh to life 
The last 10 years also saw the telecasting of two public affairs 
shows which completely captured the peoples imagination. These 
of course were the Army-McCarthy hearings, and the Kefauver Sen- 
ate Crime Committee sessions. Perhaps \ou will agree that the two 
most acid characters in these telecasts were the late Senator Joseph 
McCarthy, and the late Rudolph Hallev. counsel for the Kefauver 
Committee. You might also agree that two of the most placid and 
benign of the cast of characters were Senator Kefauver. himself, 
and attorney Joseph Welch of Boston. Senator Kefauver and Mr. 
Welch are still very much with us and active in television. The lat- 
ter did a couple of excellent Omnibus jobs recently, and there i- 
talk that Kefauver is cooking up an anti-trust idea, which may have 
a decided bearing on the future of tv networks. Kefauver. too. of 
course, was quite prominent on home screens during the last Presi- 
dential campaigns. 

It makes one wonder whether one's basic approach toward the 
pursuit of a goal isn't, indeed, a major factor in one's longe\it\. 
Senator McCarthv and Rudolph Halley were both much younger 
men than Senator Kefauver and Joseph Welch. And they pursued 
their goals with much more caustic and bitter determination than did 
the latter two gents. Maybe this is one of the small lessons of the 
past decade. Or maybe its just a coincidence. ^ 



Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

Do you always agree with what Joe Csida says in Sponsor 
Backstage? Both Joe and the editors of SPONSOR will be happy 
to receive and print your comments. Address them to Joe 
Csida, c/o sponsor, 40 E. 49//;. New York 17, New York. 



20 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 



REAL 





<^ 



< 



*»• -*J 





^ 






> 



LISTENERS 



WCCO Radio, with its vast, 114-county basic service 

area in four Northwest states, delivers the region's 

biggest audiences— a weekly circulation of 723,860 

families." That's from 2 J ■_> to 28 times greater than all other 

Minneapolis-St. Paul stations! What's more, they are 

real live listeners — not casual tuners-in lulled by a 

constant din of background music. This is the result of 

WCCO Radio's reed live personality local and CBS Radio 

Network programming, which attracts and holds attentive 

listeners. Simply stated: More people listen to WCCO 

Radio. And they hear more, including your sales message! 




wee 



he Northwest's 50,000-Watt Giant 

linneapolis-St. Paul 

^presented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 



■NCSNo.2 





RADIO 





i 



Another reason why WTVT is your best buy in the Twin Cities of the South! 



31 out of 50 top-rated 



Ww I V I dominates Tampa -St. Petersburg viewing not only 
with CBS programs, but with local shows, too! WTVT news, 
sports and weather dominate viewing in their time periods. 
Whether your schedule calls for network adjacencies or 
spot program buys, you get top audience, top results on WTVT! 

* ARB Feb. 1957. WTVT is top station -67% 
more quarter-hour firsts than the second station! 

TAMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 

Twin Cities of the South, ranks 34th in retail sales among all metropolitan 
markets, is one of the nation's fastest-growing industrial areas. Among 
marketing executives, media and time buyers, Tampa -St. Petersburg is a 

must On every market list! (Sales Management Survey of Buying Power 1W~) 



LAKELAND 




VI 



ST. PETERSBURG 



22 



WTVT dominates Tampa -St. Petersburg, and delivers bonus coverage of 239 thriving communis 



SPONSOR • 1 JUNE 1957 



shows are on WTVT 



* 




|0 a c 

• 

Pi 


t i 

• - 


- 



ews - from scene to screen in 30 minutes, 
■ith WTVT's modern transistor sound-on- 
In equipment plus 37 cameramen-corres- 
todents throughout Florida. Super-swift 
>veragc makes WTVT news highest- 
itcd in the market! 







A remote a doy was the dizzy pace set 
b) W n T camera crews during a recent 
month! Remote programs included net- 
work originations of The Garry Moore 
Show, I've Got a Secret, Let's Take a 
Trip, plus many local and regional events. 



UMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 
IPS MARKET RANKING IN 
t ERY CATEGORY! 






CBS Channel 13 





1957 


1956 




ranking 


ranking 


hi Retail 








34 


36 


Fc Store 








39 


44 


* imotive 






Sis 


29 


34 


Coral 






M handise 






So, 


33 


37 



Amount 
$786,145,000 

161,983,000 

147,698,000 

114,546,000 



(Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, May 1957) 



WTVT 

TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 



The WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY-TV and WKY Oklahoma City 

WSFA-TV Montgomery 

REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



SPONSOR • 1 JINK 195' 



23 




OTff 



PLUGS 

THE HOLE 

IN THE CENTRAL 

WASHINGTON 

MARKET 




FABULOUS HOOPER 



f Jan. 21 thru 
Feb. 9, 1957 


Mon. thru Fri. 
7 AM-12 Noon 


Mon. thru Fri. 
12 Noon-6 PM 


Sets in use 


31.4 




19.0 


KIT 


43.2 




50.1 


Sta. B 


25.1 




20.0 


Sta. C 


17.0 




15.2 


Sta. D 


14.0 




16.4 


^ Sample Size 


9,543 




11,702 J 



AM RATING AV. 13.6 
PM RATING AV. 9.5 



Washington State's FOURTH MARKET, 
with 54,478 radio homes, is 200 miles 
from Spokane, and 150 miles from Seattle 
and Tocoma — set apart by the Cascade 
mountain range. NO OUTSIDE MEDIUM 
CAN CLAIM MORE THAN AN INSIGNIF- 
ICANT DRIBBLE OF INFLUENCE AND 
COVERAGE IN THE YAKIMA MARKET 
AREA. Fill this big gap in the Northwest 
with Radio KIT, Central Washington's 
FIRST radio station — its popularity proved 
by HOOPER. KIT, Independent Radio- 
Music, News, Sports. Established 1929. 



YAKIMA, WASH. 
5000 WATTS • 1280 KC 




mv 



SOUNDS BETTER- 
SELLS BETTER 



REPRESENTATIVES 

NATIONAL: THE BRANHAM CO. 

SEATTLE: HUGH FELTIS A ASSOCIATES 

PORTLAND: O. COX A ASSOCIATES 

JACK GOETZ, Gen. Mgr. 
BOX 1222, YAKIMA, WASH. 



; * 






News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



Women and the law: One of women's greatest virtues — and prob- 
ably their most annoying one to males — has been remarkably un- 
exploited b) advertising agencies — that is, women's ability to argue 
and \\ in the argument. 

Thus attorncx Sigrid II. IVdersen at J. Walter Thompson is prob- 
ably the only woman lawyer on the staff of any of the top 20 agen- 
cies. She's also one of the few women to have become active in the 
specialized and new field of tv talent negotiations. 

"' I here tend to be a feu more women attornevs with talent 
agencies," Miss Pedersen told sponsor. "And there's at least one out- 
standing lady lawyer in the air media on a network level. I'm re- 
ferring to Geraldine Zorbaugh, v. p. and counsel for CBS Radio." 

Miss Pedersen has been an attornej with J. Walter Thompson 
since 1942. She is also a director of the U. S. Trademark Asso- 
ciation, whose 80th annual meeting she addressed on 16 May in 
Chicago concerning "The advertising agency's role in selection and 
use of trademarks." 

In private life, Sigrid Pedersen is the wife of Howard Scott Foley, 
v.p., copy department manager of Doherty. Clifford. Steers \ 
Shenfield, whom she met at JWT. Now that thev work for different 
agencies, shop talk's cut to a minimum, 'it would be legal to ex- 
change confidences, but not ethical," she says. 



Venezuelan visitor: the elated lady below should be! She's Edna 
L. Seaman who conducts programs on WFBC-TV, Greenville, S. C. — 
and she just won a trip to Venezuela. American Women in Radio 
and Tv. in convention in St. Louis this Spring, named three of its- 
members and drew r lots for the fourth as delegates to Creole Petrole- 
um Co. s get-acquainted tour down in South America. 

Edna will swap tv and radio stories with ad pros. stud\ the culture 
for her own on-the-air reports when she gets back, have fun and 
sightseeing at the same time. With her will be AW RT president 
Edythe Fern Melrose, WXYZ -\M-TV. Detroit: Helen Hall. NBC; 
Fran Rilev. Ted Bates & Co. 




Bon voyage U 



of WFBCTY. Greenville, wh 



iff t.i \ enezuela 



-'1 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 195, 



. . \\\ \ \ I I I / / / 

ASK\\\\\\ll///////5^ 



/" 



FAB 



OmRHR nBC radio 



Proudly Announces 
The Appointment of... 

Edward Petry & Company, Inc. 

• New York • Chicago • Atlanta • Los Angeles • Detroit • San Francisco • St Louis 

AS OUR EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Effective June 1, 1957 



We re proud too . . . 

that the upward audience trend in the Big Omaha 

Market is to the NEW and REVITALIZED KFAB 






It's a changing world. Along with fashions, home appliances and the 
Bhifting sands of the desert, the American language never stays put. Hardly anyone 
says "Pardon my wet glove" any more. Or "23 Skiddoo!" Or even "The cat's pajamas." 

The language of television, too, periodically gets itself turned upside down. 
Take the phrase "network quality," for instance. Years ago (like 1956), "network quality" 
was the expression everybody was using. It meant the best you could hope for— //'you were 
a national advertiser with matching budget. Even TV film syndicators wistfully resorted to 
"network quality" when they wanted to make the biggest possible claim for their product. 

When our syndicated submarine -adventure series, "The Silent Service," 
began, we kept in mind the fact that all TV-viewing is local. In any given time-period, the 
local, regional and spot-program advertiser has to be ready to compete with network shows, 
no matter how glittering their production values. We defined our market as those selfsame 
local, regional and spot advertisers exclusively. It was up to us to provide them with so prime 
a product, they could compete successfully for audience, whatever the competition might offer. 

Well, "The Silent Service" is now happily under way the length and 
breadth of the land. In city after city, regardless of what the competing attractions are, the 
major audiences are going for the action, suspense and sheer believability of "The Silent 
Service." And coast to coast, the critics have written consistently complimentary reviews. 

"Network quality?" That's one way of putting it. But today, there's a 
better way for non-network advertisers to describe television entertainment of the finest, 
most professional calibre. It's a way they can be proud of. Try saying it the modern, true-to- 
life, CNP way: "Syndicatiwi Quality!" NBC TELEVISION FILMS a division of 

CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 




Handy Bookmark Series 



Keep your place 
in Los Angeles 
with KTTV 







•\esW eS 




rese 



nte° 



fltf 



asJ's^ 



9S* 







49th a 
Madisoi 



28 



Promoting summer radio 

A month or so ago. sponsor carried an 
article on Coppertone which described 
how this product had risen to a top 
sales position within a five-year pe- 
riod with spot radio as their basic 
advertising medium. This was such 
an excellent story for summer spot 
radio, that we would like to use it 
as part of a direct mail promotion 
here in Canada. 

I was wondering if there are re- 
strictions on the use of material ap- 
pearing in your publication. No doubt 
this depends to a large extent on the 
manner in which it is used. 

Our idea is to prepare a folder en- 
titled "How one advertiser user! sum- 
mer radio with outstanding success" 
or something similar. W e would close 
with the suggestion that All-Canada, 
with their stations from coast to coast. 
can work with advertisers in planning 
a spot radio campaign this summer. 

Peter N. Harricks. manager, 
Broadcast services, All-Canada 
Radio, Toronto 

• SPONSOR is happy to make this story • , Cop- 
pertone holds off the bip-boys with spot radio." 2 
Mareh issue, available. Reader Harrieks* idea is 
one worth the thought of other stations. 



First transcribed net show 

I w as interested in Joe Csida's column 
entitled "Sponsor backstage.'' There 
were many things of interest in this 
column as he looked back over ten 
years but I think one item could stand 
correction — if my memory has not 
gone back on me. 

It had to do with the fact that ABC 
was willing to carry a transcribed 
show sponsored by Philco and star- 
rim: Bing Crosby. But earlier than 
that, when the network was still the 
Blue or becoming ABC and I was with 
the organization. I made arrange- 
ments, with the approval of my won- 
derful associates, that Coca Cola could 
sponsor Morton Downey on a trans- 
cribed-show basis, on a five-time-a- 
week. fifteen-minute program. I be- 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 1957 






lieve ii w ;i ^ \l Steele, then m iili I oca 
( lola, and some folks .ii I > \i« \ . who 
worked it oul with U-. Downe) was 
doing .1 l"i ol traveling and the prob- 
lem <>i getting him on tin' ail li\<' times 
.: week u.i- difficult. 

I believe, however, thai before I 
joined Mutual, the) had cai ■ i< -< I trans- 
cribed Bhows on the network and the) 
wen- probabl) the first network to 
make their facilities available foi 
transci ipl ions. 

But, all < redil in \!U and Philco 
and Bing Crosb) I just thought I 
might help straighten oul the record 
because at the time we did this, it sort 
of bothered a few ol the other net- 
work officials, not onl) .it VBt but 
-nmc other networks, too. 

Edgar K< >l>ak 
; // Park Ivenue, Vea > orh 



The inside track 





M 



"Pulse rings doorbells" advertisement 

\ thought i l i — t occurred to me re tlii- 
ad: its true (maybe), Pulse does ring 
doorbells but K \l)l() i- alread) inside. 

Jack Wymer, station manager, 
II ING, Dayton, Ohio 



SPONSOR Advertising Awards 

Wed like to enter our Oklahoma Pub- 
b'shing Compan) station campaigns for 
the annual SPONSOR Trade Paper Ad- 
vertising Awards, but don't know how 
to go about it. Could you tell us how? 

Jack Nelson. 
(riant Idvertising, 

Miami 



• Entrj blanks nd complete Information about 
ii..- SPONSOR Trade l'.i|..r Idvertiaing Iwards 

.ir«- atailnhlo on rft|ur-.t. It i~ ■naweeted th.il 
.-ntrir- be delayed until Jul} or Wi^l:.' to s'lon a 
larger selection »»f a.l-.. Deadline i* 15 kngiMt. 



SPONSOR 



1 JINK 195' 



The figures are startling 
. . . in San Antonio 



The shape of things in San Antonio's- big, 51- 
county market has changed. The swing to 
KONO's style of music and news is an ever- 
increasing curve. But don't take our word for it! 
Check the facts . . . the facts from N.C.S. ~2 
that make KONO Radio No. ONE with a big, 
healthy 49% penetration in San Antonio's home 
county. 

Get the facts ... all the facts . . . call your H-R 
or CLARKE BROWN man. 



860 kc 5000 watts 



E3 EZ] 



SAN ANTONIO 



RADIO 



29 



Mv"H 




IN THE CAROLINAS 

r f 



Hi 



I i I i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii 

I I 1,1 I I I 1.1 I I Mill 
4 'o 50 l'° 




-l + 5o-77 




A HARBINGER OF GOOD NEWS FOR YOU I 

There's good news for you in the NCS #2 report on actual viewing of 
Southeastern TV families. 

— 1 + 30 = 77 may even stump Univac, but for the discerning advertiser 
it means simply that WBTV lost one county in the NCS # 2, but picked up 
30 counties for a total coverage area of 77 prosperous North and South 
Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia counties. 

Here's your good news: 

• A population increase in WBTV's coverage area of 49.8% for a new 
total of 3,821,700 potential customers.* 

• A 43.3% increase in Effective Buying Income brings the new total to 
$4,258,069,000.* 

• A retail sales increase of 45.2% giving a new total of $3,028,602,000.* 

WBTV's dominant position overpowers the Carolinas' second-place station 
by 48.5%; submerges the third-ranked station by 63.6%; and swamps 
the fourth-ranked station by 80%. 

Forget your former formula. Translate — 1 + 30 = 77 into potent Sales 
Power for you ! Contact WBTV or CBS Television Spot Sales for the complete 
Nielsen story on the Southeast's top television station. 

*1956 "Survey of Buying Power" 




CHARLOTTE 



Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



SPON SO R 



J U N I 




WHO 

WILL 

MAKE 

THE 

BIG 

NIGHTTIME RADIO BREAKTHROUGH? 

Only the name of the advertiser is lacking ami when his 

campaign will start. Bui this spot buy is coming, nothing can stop it 



#% newsbreak is in the making. Who will make 
it and when are i h»- <>nl\ question marks. The rest 
of tlic stor\ could be written now — a multi-market 
saturation spot radio campaign with announcements 
slotted between 7 p.m. and midnight. 

When it happens, tin' trade press will hail the 

resurgence of nighttime radio. I p and down 
Madison Avenue, admen will talk of little else. 

Clients who now feel crowded in "traffic hour- hut 
have don- nothing about it. will hurry to -take 
claims in this newK discovered territory. Rme- 



buyers will put out call- for after-dark availabilities. 
In -hort. everyone will he caught off-balaw 
that same -mall hard i ore of realists who refused to 
bur) -pot radio when t\ lu-t grew powerful. 

Whether tin buj IS at this moment in the idea 
-lane or in the work-, makes little difference. 

W hethei it is i ompleted in 12 weeks "i 12 month- is 
unimportant. It i- inevitable, and when it does 
happen, no one should he surprised. 

Tor this week, even advertiser ha- at hi- own 
fingertips the same hard facts that are leading Com- 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 195' 



31 



When the first big nighttime radio buy is made, 
everyone will be surprised. Yet the very tacts that 
make it inevitable are common knowledge now 



pan) \ into it ~ breakthrough decision. 

Here arc those facts : 

• Spot radio dollar volume for the 
first quarter of this year, just released 
In the Station Representatives Asso- 
ciation, is up 10. V, over the same pe- 
riod in 1956 (see sponsor 25 Max I . 

\t this rate, traffic and the daytime 
hours will not long contain the grow- 
ing Hood of announcements. Someone 
will have to hu\ nighttime. 

• Increasing advertiser concern 
over the multiplicity of commercials in 
radio traffic hours, reflected in recent 
a; ency requests for station logs and 
by outspoken remarks from such ad- 
men as Foote, Cone & Belding's \rthur 
Pardoll who publicly expressed alarm 
at radio's "over -commercialization" 
and what effect it may have on memor- 
ahilitx impact of announcements. 

• In answer to charges of "over- 
commercialization." many leading sta- 
tions are beginning to ease shut the 
door to traffic hours. Even at the risk 
of losing revenue, they are saying 
"Sorry, full up." 

• The rep firm of Edward Petry & 
Co. has just advanced a plan to its sta- 
tions that involves a rate cut of 50% 
after 7 p.m. According to Vice Presi- 
dent Bill Maillefert, an "overwhelming 
majority have agreed to try it out." 
Petry salesmen, in this "Crusade for 
Nighttime Radio," will cover every ma- 
jor advertiser and agency within a 
month. Petry is spearheading this 
night sales effort in the hope that it 
will receive support of stations in all 
markets. 

• Sets -in -use figures show that 
nighttime radio attracts a substantial 
tune-in. For example, an A. C. Nielsen 
Co. \RI-NSI summary report for early 
winter 1956 (Mondaj through Friday 
exeningsl showed over 4.1 million 
homes using radio at 8 p.m. Night out- 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Biggest bargain buy in radio may now 
be in the making. SPONSOR predicts 
buyer is leader in his field, got there 
through bold, quick moves. Some ad- 
men feel the product may be in hard 
goods line, that campaign will be an- 
nouncements perhaps every half hour 
after 7 p.m., including weekends. 



ol-home listening also is substantial. 
I his Nielsen summar) also reported 
1.1 million auto radio sets-in-use at 

the same time with an average of 

about two listeners to a car. 

• \\ hile television dominates night- 
time tune-in. the accumulation of a ra- 
dio audience during a week does not 
compare too unfavorably. And the 
cost differential can be an eye-opener. 
A Nielsen Radio-Tv U?age Patterns 
Summar) for total homes reached b\ 
each medium during 4-10 March 1956 
showed that between 8 and 9 p.m. ra- 
dio reached about half the number of 
homes that tv did I 16.5 vs. 33.5 mil- 
lion ) . On WRCA and WRCA-TV, New 
York, for example, the cost of a 20- 
second tv announcement at 9 p.m. is 
$2,300, while the same length an- 
nouncement on radio costs $80. 

• The SRA Radio Trades Practice 
committee is urging stations to put 
into nighttime programing the same 
imagination that has spelled success 
for daytime sales and to support the 
nighttime programs with effective pro- 
motion. 

• Summing up. these factors will in- 
fluence the buy: A nightly potential 
audience comparable in size to that of 
Life magazine is being neglected. The 
so-called "prime" times are crowded 
with announcements: daytime hours 
are filling up. Nighttime prices max 
be made more attractive and program- 
ing more important. The picture is 
brightening at every moment, and this 
advertiser is about to take advantage 
of the very thing his competitors have 
written off. 

What kind of company will make 
this first major nighttime radio bux ? 
\\ hat is the corporate image? 

He is a sharp businessman, always 
on the prowl for a bargain. He is a 
rugged individualist, indifferent to 
what other advertisers are doing. In 
his approach to buying, he goes more 
by feel than statistics; his interest 
in ratings is slight; what he asks of 
radio is that it deliver sales at a rea- 
sonable cost. 

He max well be a newcomer to radio 
advertising. Or he may be one of 
those that dropped out of radio in the 
early days of tv and have not yet re- 



turned. Before he makes the nighttime 
buy. he will listen to a good deal of 
reasons why he shouldn't make it. He 
may even momentarily consider trying 
to wedge into the traffic hours with 
everybody else, but then his gambling 
instincts will take over. 

For this advertiser is a gambler, and 
he has alxxaxs gambled successfully. 
He is a leading manufacturer in his 
field. He got to that position by tak- 
ing the right chances, by moving 
quick!) and dramatically while his 
business rivals paused. He will not re- 
gard his bold move into nighttime 
radio as a gamble, hoxvever. He has 
made his decision xxith the same care 
and evaluation that a successful han- 
dicapper puts into picking a horse. He 
will not tip-toe timidly into the buy 
with a test-market here and there; he 
will move in confidently xvith a multi- 
market order. 

In constructing this corporate im- 
age, sponsor talked with a number of 
media people. Most of them saw this 
first advertiser as someone in the hard 
goods line. "I just can't see him in 
soaps or foods," one adman said. 

I Perhaps the shock of the Ford $4.2 
million network radio buy is still felt 
on Madison Avenue.) 

As for the kind of buy he will make, 
here was another adman's guess: A 
saturation schedule with spots every 
hour or half-hour between 7 p.m. and 

II p.m. across the board, extended 
through week-ends. "It could turn out 
to be the biggest bargain buy in ra- 
dio," he added. 

The buy could hit the headlines at 



Here are four reasons 



1. 



BUSINESS AT PEAK 



SRA reports spot radio 
dollar volume for first 
quarter 1957 up 40.5% 
over same period in 1956. 
At this rate daytime hours 
will not long contain 
growing number of an- 
nouncements. Nighttime 
buy is thus inevitable 
as radio demand grows. 



32 



sponsor 



1 ju.ne 1957 



almost .in\ moment, lince radio listen- 
ing dues nut drop <>IT in summer. I hi- 
advertisei suspects there is a vaal un- 
measured audience "I radio fans, He 
know- ili.it millions are on the move 
during h< >t summei nights and that 
their radios go wiili them portables, 
|m .. kit transistors, and the sets in '• • 
million car-. He mighl break his cam- 
paign during the summei and carrj ii 
through I h<- fall. 

What ma) hasten his move into this 
nightttime purchase maj I"- various 
fm in- of action on the pari "I stations. 

( me <>f these ma) be renewed atten- 
tion t<> nighttime pi ograming. Inn 
mam stations throughout the countrj 
have taken the defeatist attitude: "We 
can't sell it an) wa) . so win won*) 
about programing. \ numbei ol me- 
dia people told sponsor that the l>iu- 
thing w rong w iili nighttime radio 
was that it- programing lacked impact. 
\imI without impact, the) felt it was 
onproducth e. 

Several suggested that rotating some 
of the strong daytime personalities 
into nighttime spots might do a lot to- 
ward attracting advertisers into p.m. 
hours. 

"Our Trade Practice Committee is 
stressing about the same thing," said 
I jm\ Webb, SRA managing director. 
""We're telling the stations that the) 
can sell nighttime il the) have a good 
product They've proved what the) 
could do through greal daytime pro- 
graming, and the) can do it at night 
without cutting prices." 

In general, nighttime radio i- slight- 
ly helow the cost ol daytime. Davtime 



1 'on 1 M lite oil ra 


din during peak telex 


i-ion \ icu ing hours 






RADIO 


TELEVISION 


HOURS 


DAYS 


HOMES REACHED IN WIIK 


HOMES REACHED IN Wl 1 K 


'■ . .1.111. 


\| 1 


11,515,000 


1.018.000 


1 III. 


\l 1 


21,056,000 


6 213.000 


:: '< ...in. 


M I 


24.675,000 


12 004.000 


9 in. em. 


\l l 


22,842,000 


13.303.000 


in II i in. 


\l 1 


20,445,000 


14.461.000 


II 12 Noon 


\l l 


21,056,000 


IB. 568. 000 


12-] p .!■ 


\l 1 


21,150,000 


19,059.000 


pan. 


M 1 


19,693,000 


18.357 000 


I'm. 


\l 1 


17,719,000 


17.796,000 


1 i p..... 


\l 1 


16,779,000 


20,358,000 


I i p.m. 


M I 


18,048,000 


23,201.000 


■ 6 p.m. 


\i 1 


19,552,000 


26.185.000 


6 • p.m. 




22,701,000 


32,011.000 


P ML 




20 257,000 


33.205,000 


8<> p. in. 




16,544,000 


33 52 1,000 


9 in p.m. 




15,040,000 


33.310,000 


in 1 1 p. in 




13,912,000 


32.292.000 


II I2mid. 




10,575,000 


26.079.000 


BOURCI 


; in Ma 





traffic hours, naturall) . often cost more 
because of the demand. Packages .o\>\ 
lo the complexit) of the rate-. But 
there are -iili stations that li-t nights 
,i- ( la— '" \" time. I he ( 1!^ Network 
Radio Impact Plan for night and week- 
ends ha- upped <\.\\ rates, lowered 
nights and week-end-. In effect, CBS 
nighttime i- now two-third- the cost of 
d.is lime. 

Now Edward Petr) & (■><. ha- come 

forward with it- own plan to sell night 
i adio. This plan .all- for a reduction 
to .">(>', of regular da) package rates 
in regulai rale-. Uthough nighttime 
listening is more than 50' i ol da\ 



tune-in. the Peti y Co. feels that a -t i i> t 
proportionate i ul is not enough at this 
time because of advertisers' reluctance 
to bu) during peak t\ bom s. 

"It is 'fashionable 9 to bu) 7 to 9 
a.m. and 1 to 7 p.m., says Petr) - 
Bill Maillefert. "It seems 'unfashion- 
able' to bu) at night." 

-.. tin- rep firm suggests the flat 
.".ii' i reduction in rate-, because it is a 
dramatic reduction, one that is easil) 
promotable ("Now you can buy twice 
as main spots at night !"), and one 
that will give advertisers the best value 
ol the entire da) . 

i Please turn to pagt 7 1 < 



nltiple-market saturation spot radio campaign after 7 p.m. must come 






AUDIENCE SIZE 



ielsen sets-in-use fig- 
es show that practically 
ty night at 8 p.m. more 
an 4 million homes are 
ned to radio plus about 
5 million cars. The cum- 
ative radio audience in 
week comes close to 
'ilf the tv audience and 
tes are much below tv. 



3. 



AUDIENCE MOOD 



The first major user of 
night spot radio will con- 
sider these factors: The 
evening audience is un- 
hurried, less plagued by 
rushing kiddies off to 
school and catching toast 
before it burns. The auto 
audience is in a more re- 
laxed and receptive mood. 



4. 



PROGRAM REVAMP 



For too long many stations 
have said about nighttime: 
"We can't sell it, so why 
program?" This has been 
a major client complaint. 
Now watch for stations to 
build night programs with 
same imagination as went 
into daytime. SRA urges 
stations to do just that. 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 195' 



33 



MARKETING MAN'S DREAM 




Max Factor has a dream product: Curl Control is the only one of 
its kind on the market, has expandable tv and promotion budget 
for a straight news yet glamor appeal, is made by an established 
name in the cosmetics field and reaches the mass of women 




Product introduction: eyefuls give field salesmen an earful about Curl Control 



By Jane Pinkerton 

^^ LOS ANGELES 

1 oday's marketing pro — squeezed, 
pressed and pummeled by consumer 
and competitive pressures — has a re- 
curring dream during his more quiet 
sleep. It runs something like this. 

"I wish I had a product which was 
exciting to women and so new no one 
else had it. I'd like it to have a pre- 
sold name, a budget big enough to sus- 
tain a campaign for full distribution, 
impact advertising and persuasive 
point-of-sale. And it should be in de- 
mand for both practical and impracti- 
cal reasons. In fact, out-and-out glam- 
or wouldn't hurt a bit. And it should 
be priced so a truly mass market can 
afford it." 

This marketing man is in for a large 
charge. There is such a halcyon dream 
— and it's come to life in the labora- 
tories of Max Factor in Hollywood. 
The product is — thus far — one of a 
kind, the new Curl Control. It's a 
magic kind of product for almost every 
woman. You spray it on dampened 
hair, set the hair in pin curls- — and 
the curls last a week! It's not a gooej 
lacquer I which women abhor I and it 8 
not a home permanent I which the gals 
consider something of a chore i . It 
combines the better elements in both 
products: a "fixative" type ingredient 
which leads to longer lasting curls. 

What about the rest of the dream? 

The Max Factor name, after 50 
years' identification with beauty. Hol- 
[ywood, cosmetics and perfumes land. 
\ es. sex I is well established as a 
known authority among all types of 
women. Factor wants to reach and be 
known to every one of these types, at 
every income level, because the peren- 






■ 1 



SPONSOR 



1 june 1957 





Product testing: Ufred Firestein (1.), map ol Factor's Pharmaceutical Dii . and Robert 

Bard, adv. mgr., check in-action results I ontrol applii I on real hail in fa is "wig 

i n" <•( the Hollywood laboratory. This precedes consume! panel and actual m.trki i testing 



Product development: Di Paul Jewel 
ks chemical formula with Robert 

\\ al in< < ' I i in. I fern < ohen in the lal> 



nial search for beautification i- umn- 
in - most common denominator. The 
.una ol glamor is tin- real package for 
;in\ Factor product. 

Hut tin- tin container, as i- the case 
with Curl Control, maximizes the glam- 
or theme. The pre-sold name, Followed 
1>\ ad\crtisim:. leads the woman into 
the store and there she sees the at- 
tractive. colorful package which 
cinches the sale. V.s a point-of-pur- 
chase help. Factor has designed un- 
usual displa) stand- toppeil by Furl 
Control mobiles. 

The advertising is split 60- in be- 
tween spot television and local news- 
paper, the latter on a co-op l>a-i- with 
participating retailer-. ^ ci i\ is given 
"90' i ol the long-term advertising 
burden" because of the advantage ol 
demonstration, says Robert M. Bard, 
I actor s advertising and promotii in 
manager for the Pharmaceutical and 
Specialty Division. 

This combination of t\ and news- 
paper in just five months' time- from 
a standing -tart will push distribu- 
tion to the 100' < level, says Bard. To- 
day, after three month- of advertising 
the new Curl Control, the product has 
saturation distribution in the top 50 t" 
60 markets roughly 55 ( of the dis- 
tribution the company see 1 -. 

Rut. most important to the market- 
ing man. how i- it selling? What doc- 
all this really add up to? 

Bruce Vltman, account supervisoi 
on Factor at the Vnderson-McConnell 
agency in Hollywood, says sales 
zoomed skyward at such a rate after 
the 23 February introduction that the 
budget had to be upgraded and revised 



three time- in the first five-week peri- 
od. "We'd figured our growth esti- 
mates h -i ■ sound, hul we >■ 
o(T in actual production, shipping and 
market-b -market advertisine growth 
tuse ol consun ei demand." 
Bard Bays "We're doing very well. 
It look- like out advertising formula. 
based on test marketing, is working." 

Wholesaler " reaction: Factor's 
wholesale customers like the band- 
i agon they find themselves on, too. 

Two are buyers in big New York 
drug houses, and both can trace the 
effect?- of the New York area t\ intro- 
duction in February. Here's what 
Charles Yamarone of the Henry I!. 
Cohen Drug Co. has to sa\ : "T\ has 
had the greatest effect on sales here. 
Since the first month of advertising, 
weve ordered three times as much 
Curl ("ontrol. We think it- sales in 
our lIMt -tore- are terrific." 

robin Hechkoss ol Whelan Drug 
Store-, which ha- 1 50 retail outlet- in 
the New York metropolitan area, likes 
the combination of i\ demonstration 
backed by newspaper reminds] adver- 
tising. " I \ undoul tedh has i' e 
to do with the sales, and the combina- 
tion of both media in a saturation 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Max Factor is using tv to introduce 
marketers' ideal product. Curl Con- 
tiol has no competition, is a glamor 
item which appeals to the mass; the 
manufacturer has established name 
and flexible advertising, promotion 
budget; copy is jammed with news. 



i i\ e is produi ing l"i I a< toi and f"i 
us. It's a dandy item, and it gained 
momentum fast right aftn it was intro- 
■ ■'in id into the mat ket.' 

There are two winning formulas 
which Factor developed. The dr-t. the 
chemical formula for Curl • lontrol it- 
self, c olved from several years of 
work in it- Hollywood laboratories. 
I. ah work was completed last June. 

and the product and consume! testing 

procedure began. 

Product test: Coincident with 
product and consumer testing was tin- 
actual market testing with advertising. 
I his was the second formula worked 
i ut by Bard and his advertising staff. 
The calendar of marketing events: 
In June, when the chiel chemist, Dr. 
Paid Jewel, repot ted ' ut] < ontro 
in it- final distilled state, pa 
took over to design a spray containei 
which would be useful and decorative. 
i Inn ( in I ( ontrol was teste I in 1 
tor's ow n beauty clinic and on - 

21 1 • women w ho make up 

panel. < rbjeel ol the test : to 

: reactions from w hich copy points 

i >uld be made later. 

"Mi isl .nl\ ertising cla 
o] ed in this wa . says Vltman, "• - 
cially on a i osmetic t\ pe of produi t. 
en are « ei } vo< al - and very fus- 
sy, too. We found every single major 
copy theme in their comments. 

Market test: I hi- was the next st< 
Factor picked Phoenix and Dayton, 
figuring that I etween these two . 
graphical extremes a lot of element- 
influential in the final l>u\ iiu decision 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 1 ( )57 



35 



Two-market spot tv test grew in two months 

to 50 markets, in four months to three network shows 



would be covered. Apart from the ob- 
vious fact that each woman's liair is 
different, a cosmetic manufacturer is 
aware of some of the predictable fac- 
tors which help make this difference. 
Weather, climate, water, air content, 
occupation — all have a bearing on 
usage of hair preparations. 

Anderson-McConnell and Factor de- 
veloped an advertising pattern for 
these two test markets for an October 
starting date. This pattern was so suc- 
cessful — so fast — that :i is almosl e - 
actly the same one used todaj in 50 
markets as the company plans for full 
national coverage by summer. 

From four to six weeks after the 
market testing began, Factor field men 
called on even retailer to check on 
sales and customer reaction. The) also 
inter\ iewed women in the stores to de- 
termine if they were bu\ing the prod- 
uct for (| lt . f] rs t time or 'jetting a new- 
supply. 

"Selling the first can of Curl Con- 
trol isn't important," says Bard. "\\ e 
have to re-sell it many time over, and 
that's why we conducted this expensive 
interviewing. We wanted to know if 
w (mien were getting the results the} 
should have been. We know in most 
instances if the products 'don't work' 



it's because women aren't reading the 
directions <>n the package. The) rarely 
follow instructions as the) should!" 

The test market came under full con- 
trol, and Factor maintained its adver- 
tising schedules in both cities. Then 
came the preparation for a market-by- 
market splurge in late February — a 
mass consumer testing campaign with 
product use by 1,000 women. 

Ever) element was re-checked: the 
product itself, the container, the copy 
themes, the instructions, the cost, the 
scent of the liquid. Factor made a few 
refinements and launched its advertis- 
ing and distribution nationally. 

Consumer profile: Who bu s Curl 
Control? Most of them are working 
women, followed by housewives and 
then by teenagers. So Bard selects 
prime nighttime slots for his 20's and 
daytime slots for his minutes — with 
the weight on nighttime. But their 
market is unlimited. Why? 

Altman explains. Every woman is 
conscious of her physical person, and 
she does tend to think that a woman's 
hair is her crown of glorv ! In the past 
seven years women have been condi- 
tioned to aerosol sprays in all manner 
of products — and they've been corn- 



Product copy: Bruce Altman, acct. exec, Anderson-McConnell agency, gi\es o.k. 
for t\ film storyboard to Fran Harris, creative director, Harris-Tuchman Production- 




pletely pre-sold on spra\s for the hair. 

More than 30'c of all adult women 
in the past year have used a hair 
spray, and 50% of them have had a 
permanent in that time (with more 
than half of these getting a permanent 
in their own homes). "So at least 
50' c to 60' i of all women — right now 
— are potential customers for Curl 
Control," says Altman. "And Ave 
think because so man) women don't 
like lacquer sprays or home perma- 
nents that we'll open up a huge new 
market from among non-users." 

Another factor in Factor's favor: 
women today have more money than 
ever before, and this new high level of 
disposable income means more dollars 
for non-necessities. Besides, Bard 
comments, no woman ever stinted on 
beauty aids an\ wa\ . 

Tv mainstay: "We chose tele- 
vision," says Bard, ""as the base of our 
advertising structure for several rea- 
sons. Moving as fast as we have been, 
and as we will, we wanted to be flexi- 
ble. It's hard for a cosmetic compan) 
cannot plan a year in advance, as 
some companies seem to be able to. 
We have to be able to move quickly. 
It's completely typical to figure you'll 
spend $100,000 at the start of a cam- 
paign and find that within a few 
months you're putting out SI million. 

"We move fast — and our advertis- 
ing has to do the same. Many times 
we'll call our agency on Monday and 
order something like 20 more an- 
nouncements to go on the air Friday. 
Our revisions are constant, and usu- 
allv much larger than initial buys." 

The biggest reason for tv was. of 
course, it ability to demonstrate. In 
this case, the product was completely 
new in concept as well as in name. It 
needed an instructive, step-by-step 
demonstration — and this is the objec- 
tive of the original film commercial 
used during the introductory period 
and of the three new commercials 
which are being readied for showing. 

June Kirbv. an actress and model. 
appears in the campaign-starter which 
was filmed by David Commons of Hol- 
lywood Film Commercials. This one- 
minute announcement was used dur- 
ing the testing process and at the open- 
ing of the national campaign. Miss 
Kirby, tieing in with the television ad- 
vertising, appeared at company sales 
meetings and pre-tested some of the 
cop) themes on live shows sponsored 
in various parts of the country. From 



SPONSOR 



1 .n m: 195; 



these live-action commercials a new 
Ml i.l filmed commercial! has been 
e\ <>l\ ed undei Bard - direct ion. 

I hej 're produced bj I Ian i-- 1 uch- 
in. in |'i oductiona in 1 1< >IK wood, and 

they're straighl selling ap] ichea to 

application "I both Curl * onl i"l pack- 
ages, the one for medium and the one 
fin fine hair. Fran Han i-. i real i\ e 
director, has centered attention mi 
three focal points with a <lii eel appeal 
in the iinli\ iilual woman in the \ iew - 
ing audience. 

One "I ilir minutes features a blond, 
another a brunette ami the third a high 
fashion model. Utman, in comment- 
ing <>n tin- new series, Bays "We're 
luck) to have real news ami an inter- 
esting M"i\. a- we <l". so we don I have 
in go ver) fai afield from straighl 
selling. We probabl) have more haul 
-I'll, information-packed product news 
mi mi! cutting room floors than man) 
advertisers have in their commercials! 

Ma\ Factor has always made news. 
It ha- developed literall) hundreds >>f 
cosmetic, beauty, hair and drug prod- 
ucts. Tin- product development, itself, 
has been newsworthy. Jusl a- impor- 
tant in the final -air. however, is the 
showmanship which accompanies the 
merchandising ami advertising. 

(Inil Control's division, Pharma- 
ceutical ami Specialty, i- a spanking 
new unit which came into being lasl 
September as tin- product was being 
test marketed. The other products air 
Sebb, a dandruff control product, ami 
Sof-Sel haii sprays. Curl Control is 
currentl) getting 60^5 ol the division's 
advertising budget, ^.nderson-McCon- 
iu'11 services this portion of the ac- 
count, with Doyle, nam- & Bernbach, 
New York, handling cosmetics. 
sponsor 9 Januar) 1956, *"S| >. >t i\ ira- 
pact boosts Max Factor sales 29%.' • 

Th iginal break in the Curl Con- 
trol advertising campaign was dour 
with spol t\ and local newspapers. 
However, as the distribution has rap- 
iill\ expanded deeper penetration i-. 
of course, necessary. B) I July, net- 
work t\ with three programs Mas- 
querade l'a>/\ and I'miii (NBC and 
Those 11 kiting (^irls (CBS) all on an 
alternate l>a-i>. will be carrying the 
Curl Control message. 

Ufred Firestein, division manager 
for the pharmaceuticals and special- 
ties, supervises activit) and growth ol 
his division. His unit plans main new 
product- for the line, as dors the Cos- 
metic Division, and both will have a 
record-setting ad budget this year. ^ 



SPONSOR 



1 jink 1957 







Retailei interest in campaign is spurred l>\ novel cartoon contest 

WONG TIME, WONG TEMPERATURE 

\\ ong's Chinese Foods buys radio public 

service spots with unique ploy <»" brand name 

Selling the client on advertising is at times more of a problem 
than convincing the consumer to bu) hut both tall easil) into 
line when you find the right idea. 

Station KFWB, Los Vngeles, had -old time to every \1 • >t 1 1 & 

Siteman agenc) account except Wong's Frozen Chinese I Is 

(which had never used am radio). Boh PurcelL v.p. ami general 
manage] quipped "Why don't we -<-ll them tin- Won- time and 
Wong temperature?" Hi- -tall' laughed, hut then did just that. 

\loltl & Siteman was quick to see the value ol these announce- 
ments in terms "I brand identification a clear -p.-llimj out of the 
product name in a catchy, memorable manner. 

I he merchandising push started three weeks prioj to the air 
campaign. Ilrits Thomas, KIWI!'- merchandising director, con- 
tacted 600 supei markets in the greater Los Angeles area b) mail, 
phone and personal representative, as well as all frozen food dis- 
tributors. The result was an appreciable increase in demand 
(for inventories) before the start ol the consume] campaign. 

Immediate consumer response prompted an extension of the 
campaign into a neighboring market \\ ith permission from 
KFWB, "Wong time — Wong temperature is now being aired on 
\\ \\\ \. Phoenix, and causing as much comment thru-. 

Another direct mail piece, in the form ol a contest is in tin- 
work- for distribution to all of the market managers in the ana. 
One major market chain which normall) toil, id- direct <"nta. 
of -tore manager- ha- okayed tin- effort because of the novell 
the idea. I he contest i- based on the cartoon shown above. 
Store managers are invited to submit their li-t of error-, lo the 
winner (among other prizes) a desk thermometer-barometer. 

Wong's schedule on KFWB i- for 12 time-temperature signals 
per day, seven days a week, e\e\\ hour on the half-houi from 
7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.. ami i- firm tor 2<> wrrk-. 

Dm Wong, president ami -air- managei "t the company finds 
retailers greet him with "here comes the Won- man. ^ 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 





ANOTHER "MEAT 


AND 


POTATOES" YE* 




if Ml 

IVieat and potatoes year' and 


Charted here are all sponsored network tv 


"nothing new" are the labels already 
being hung on nighttime network tv 




programing for the upcoming season. 


shows for the nighttime period covering 7:30-11. 


This before the fall schedule is even 
off the ground. 




How true are the charges? 


Listings are only for shows firm at presstime 


• It's true: there are no daring and 




expensive programing experiments in 




the offing. 


Only costs for new shows listed below. For this season's show costs 


• And true : to-date with about 


see monthly Tv Basics. Costs below are gross, include 15% agency commission, 


three-fourths of the schedule set, no 


are average and cover talent and production only. TBA means "to be announced," 


startlingly different program formats 


refers to information as yet unavailable for either show or sponsor. 


have yet shown up or are likely to. 










SUN DAY 


M O N DAY 


TU ESD AY 


■ 


ABC CBS NBC 


ABC CBS NBC 


ABC CBS NBC 






Sally 


Robin Hood 




Cheyenne 






C ,. 


Feature Film 


Jack Benny Chemstrand alt 


program and Johnson & program and 


C.E. Name That Tune program and 




Kaiser Alum. 


alt TBA Royal McBee 


sponsor not set \ Johnson sponsor not set 


alt with Kellogg alt sponsor not set 




(in negotiation) 


Amer. Tob. 


541,500 




alt 


Sugarfoot 


Whitehall 












Wildroot 










D^ F 






Steve Allen 






Sugarfoot 




Cobel-Fisher 




Feature Film 


Ed Sullivan 


S. C. Johnson alt 


program and Burns & Allen 1 Restless Cun 


Amer Chicle i/i 


Phil Silvers Show 


D .U 


(Cont'd) 


Lincoln-Mercury 


Pharma-Craft 


sponsor not set 


Carnation alt i Warner-Lambert 


TBA Vi 


P&C alt Chesterfield alt 


"I 






& Creyhound 




Cen Mills 


$37,500 


$45,000 1/2 hr 


R. J. Reynolds 


RCA & Whirlpool 
$100,000 














Wells Fargo 








~ 


Feature Film 


Ed Sullivan 


Steve Allen 


Bold Journey 


Talent Scouts 


Amer Tob 


Wyatt Earp 


TBA 


Cur cf 


(Cont'd) 


(Cont'd) 


(Cont'd) 


Ralston-Purina 


Toni alt 


alt Buick 


P&C alt 


Lever 


(Cont'd) 


Bn< M 










Lipton 


$38,500 


Cen Mills 


alt Shulton 




i 


Feature Film 


C.E. Theatre 


Chevy Show 


Voice of Firestone 


Danny Thomas 


Twenty-One 


Broken Arrow 


To Tell The 


Meet McCraw 


0:z. 


(Cont'd) 


C.E. 


Chevrolet 


Firestone 


Cen Foods 


Pharmaceuticals 


Miles alt 


Truth 


1 






5150,000 




$47,500 




TBA 


Pharmaceuticals 


$33,000 




















Bob Cummings 




program and 


Hitchcock 


Chevy Show 


Welk Top Tunes 


December 


5 Star Theatre 


Telephone Time 


Red Skelton R. J. Reynolds alt 


Walt, '1 


sponsor not set 


Presents 


(Cont'd) 


& New Talent 


Bride Alcoa-Coodyear 


AT&T 


Pet alt Chesebrough- 


R 




Bristol-Myers 




Dodge-Plymouth 


Cen Foods 


$40,000 




S. C. Johnson 


Ponds 


s 


Mike Wallace 




















Interview 


564,000 Challenge 


Loretta Young 




Studio One 


Crisis 


program and $64,000 Question program and 


Wed N ' 


Philip Morris 


Revlon 


P&C 


Welk (Cont'd) 


Westinghouse 


Ford alt TBA 


sponsor not set Revlon sponsor not set 


Menneil • 


$15,000 


alt P. Lorillard 








$79,500 










program and 


What's My Line? 
Helene Curtis 


no network 


program and 


Studio One 


Crisis 


program and 


TBA 


program and 


wvd N 1 
iC 


sponsor not set 


alt 


service 


sponsor not set 


(Cont'd) 


(Cont'd) 


sponsor not set 


L&M sponsor not set 




Sperry-Rand 



















R NET TV? 



But, if ii is .1 meal and potatoes sea- 
son, those Btaples are being well ;ai 
Dished uiili these ingredients: 

• Big dollai outlay foi a "class" 
product in the new shows. 

• \ru "name" faces beading up 
their <>\\ n shows. 

• \ mass "l extravaganza "specials" 
— probabl) al the rate "I one .1 week 

ng between $250,000 and | Inn.. 
000 per Bhow. 

Biggest trend in fall programing is 
the upsurge in vocalist-fronted pro- 
grams. Of the sponsored -hew- al- 



read) set, In will I"- beadlined by 
singei b. 1 1" rostei includes : * in new 
Bhowa ' ' risele Mat Kenzie, Patti P 
Dinah Shore, Patrice Munsel, Pal 
Boone, Gu) Mitchell, Eddie I ishei and 
Frank Sinatra; ' in shows retui ning 
from last season I Pei 1 ) « omo and 
I 1 me- Ford. 
Othei highlights of I'',. 

• Situation comedy, variety, west- 
ern and drama are the dominant pro- 
gram t\ pes. 

• Film shows are outdistancing live 
foi the lii-i time. 

• There are more split sponsoi 
~lii|i- than evei before. 

• ( losts continue t<> 1 ise ' U\<- to 
In' , <>ii most shows I . 

Program i\|><»: While the newest 
tiling i- the vocalists, and westerns are 



booming, situation ■ omed) apparentl) 
>iill i- the favored format ^iili I 
1 the In gesl share I of pie 5< 1 • harl 
comparing sponsored nighttime shows 
by i\ pes f"i the I • "f ili<- 

1956 1 . and 195" ons on 

In. 1 I In- . ombined lialf houi and 
houi variety 1 ategoi \ i- 1 unning in 
1 lose set ond pla< e with II' ! f"i the 
< oming season, up ovei last veai - 
II.. \\ estei n- 1 mi 1 ombining 
houi and half-houi ! show an in< n wt 
also h iili I _" . this -• ason .1- . om- 
1 ired i" '" ._.• , last. However, the 
westerns figure may zoom highei when 
the final enti ies are ill in. NBI I \ 
has two westerns il is pushing and 
\l!< I \ has three tentatively planned 
for Saturday night. 

Drama and quiz-panel al this time 



■' 



_ , _ - - 



NBC 



TH U R S D AY 

ABC CBS NBC 



F R I D AY 

ABC CBS NBC 



S ATU R D AY 

ABC CBS NBC 





W.igon Train 
sponsor TBA 


Circus Boy 
Mars alt 
Kellogg 


Sgt. Preston 
Quaker Oats 


Tic Tac Dough 

Warner-Lambert 

alt TBA 

S25.000 


Rm Tin Tin 
Nabisco 


program and 
sponsor not set 


program and 
sponsor not set 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Perry Mason 

Purex alt TBA 

S87.000hr 


People Arc Funny 

R ] Reynolds alt 

Tom 


J 

i 

< 
■ 

M 


Wagon Train 

Cont'd' 


Zorro 

7-Up alt 

A. C. Spark Plugs 

$45,500 


Harbourmaster 

R |. Reynolds 

•II TBA 

$38,000 


You Bet Your Life 
Toni alt 
DcSoto 


|im Bowie 

Amcr Chicle alt 

TBA 


TBA 
Cen Foods 
alt Spcrry- 

Rand 


Court of Last 
Resort 

P Lonll.ird 
$28,000 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Perry Mason 
Cont'd' 


Perry Como 

Kleenex 

Noxzcma 
Amcr Dairy 

Knomark 
RCA & Whirlpool 

Sunbeam 


1 


Father Knows 

Best 
Scott Paper 


Real McCoys 
Sylvania 
S35.000 


Climax 
Chrysler 


Dragnet 
L&M alt Schick 


Patrice Munsel 
Buick alt 
Frigidaire 

S45.000 


Zanc Crcy 
Cen Foods alt Ford 


Life of Riley 
Lever alt Kleenex 


program and 
sponsor not set 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Perry Como 

(Cont'd) 


in 


Kraft Theatre 
Kraft 


Pat Boone 

Chevrolet 

$45,000 


Climax 'Cont'd' 


People's Choice 
Borden alt TBA 


Frank Sinatra 
Chesterfield 

S67.500 


Mr. Adams & Eve 

R. |. Reynolds alt 

Colgate 


Manhunt 

Amcr Tobacco 

alt TBA 

S3! 000 


Lawrence Welk 
Dodge 


Calc Storm 
Nestle alt 
H Curtis 


TBA 
L&M alt Max 

Factor 


■crct 


Kraft (Cont'd* 


OSS 

Menncn 
$28,750 


Playhouse 90 

Bristol-Myers 

Philip Morris 

Kimberly-Clark 

Amcr Cas 

Yi hr alt wks TBA 


Tenn Ernie Ford 
Show 
Ford 


Date With Angels 
Plymouth 
S38.000 


Schliti Playhouse 
Schilti 


TBA 
Campbell alt TBA 


Welk 'Cont'd' 


Have Cun 

Will Travel 

Lever alt 

Whitehall 

S33.000 


Cisclc MacKcnzic 

Scott Paper alt 

Schick 

S46 000 


Ion 
TMre 


This Is Your Life 
P&C 


Navy Log 
U. S. Rubber 


Playhouse 90 
'Cont'd' 


Lux Video Theatre 
Lever Bros. 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Line Up 

P&C alt 

Brown & 

Williamson 


Cavalcade of 
Sports 
Gillette 


Cuy Mitchell 
Rcvlon 
$47,000 


Gunsmoke 
L&M 


|ane Wyman 
Quaker Oats 


fit; 


no network 
service 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Playhouse 90 
'Cont'd! 


Lux Video Theatre 
iCont'd' 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Person to Person 

Time alt 
Amer Oil & Hamm 


Cavalcade of 

Sports 

[Cont'd! 

Red Barber's 

Corner 

State Farm 

Insurance 


program and 
sponsor not set 


program and 
sponsor not set 


Hit Parade 
Amer Tob alt Toni 



Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

Situation comedy is still the most numerous nighttime 



show type 





1956-57 


1957-58 


SHOW TYPES 


NO. 


% 


NO. 


% 


Adventure 


8 


7 


8 


8 


Comedy 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Drama 1 hr 


14 


12 


7 


7 


Drama VL' hr 


11 


9'/ 2 


8 


8 


Drama 1Y> hr 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Documentary 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Feature Film 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Interview 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Misc. 


6 


5 '/a 


5 


5 


Music 1 hr 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Music y 2 hr 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Mystery 1 hi 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Mysterj * '■> hr 


5 


4 


6 


6 


Quiz-Panel 


15 


13 


9 


9 


Sit. Comedy 


17 


15 


15 


15 


Sport 


3 


2'/2 


3 


3 


Variety 1 hr 


8 


7 


6 


6 


Variety % hr 


5 


4 


8 


8 


Western 1 hr 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Western % hr 


10 


8'/2 


10 


10 


TOTAL 


114 


100% 


100 


100% 



Chart does not include programs with co-op or participating sponsors 
L957 58 figures are as of presstime and not final. 



liilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ,!■: !' : ,!ll:: ■:'':.::' ;7 ..il'" ,11' .,; II Illj||llllllill|||||||illlll||||||||il 



show the biggest drop comparing this 
coming season to last. Hour dramas 
dropped from 12 to 7%, half-hour 
dramas from 9% to 8% and quiz- 
panel from 13 to 9%. So far only one 
new quiz, and a copy of a successful 
daytimer at that, has been added t<> 
the fall list. This is NBC TV's Tac Tac 
Dough. 

Two other categories to note are 



adventure and mystery. Both of these 
have made slight gains. Adventure is 
up 1% and half-hour mystery is up 
2%. Two mystery shows of hour 
length also turn up this year. The re- 
surgence of the mystery format may 
be a trend to watch. (Note: sponsor 
uses the term mystery in a broad sense 
to encompass detective, police and 
suspense-myster) dramas as well.) 



|l||lllllllll!llllllllllllll!llll!llll!llll!lllll!llllllllllll!lll!ll!llllllllllllllll I !' ilHil' ';:'!ilill!'':i;!'|iiT iMili'!!! 1 iiri'"-!^'!!''!!^ 

More than half of nighttime shows next season will he film 





LIVE 


FILM 


SEASON 


NO. 


°0 


NO. 


% 


1956-57 


351/2 


53% 


32 


47% 


1957-58 


26 


46i/2 % 


30 


5314 % 



I Ini lu< i' "i M 1 1 li [pkting hours; 

.1 of press! [me and not tlnal. 

■■in 



m 



Film vs. live shows: While filmed 
hours are ahead of live hours I again 
this is in reference to nighttime spon- 
sored time onl\ 1 for the first time this 
coming season, that unfilled one- 
quarter of the schedule could change 
the balance. In the 1957-58 picture, 
as of now. film is ~' \ ahead of live. 
At the beginning of the 1956-57 sea- 
son live was 6% ahead of film. I See 
chart appearing directl) at left. 1 

Split sponsorships: Not unexpect- 
ed is the rise in alternate and multiple 
sponsorships. At the beginning of the 
1956-57 season there were 60 single 
sponsors to 51 who shared shows. 
Which means 46' < of that season's 
shows had multiple sponsors. The 
coming fall there are 51 single and 48 
split, so far. 

Costs: While costs of the returning 
shows are going up from 5 to 10%, 
costs of new programs run even high- 
er. The quality factor is the main rea- 
son here. Below are average costs of 
the brand new shows b\ t\ pes as com- 
pared to the average costs of the same 
type as of last November : 

TYPE 1956-57 1957-58 

Drama lhr $59,000 $83,250 

Drama Mir ... 34,300 ... 11.250 
Sit Comedy ... 36,500 ... 17.500 

Varietj lhr ...61,300 ...... 121,500 

Variet) Y 2 \a 46.200.. in. 100 

Adventure ...34,000 .. 36,500 

i Note: the 1956-57 figures in the 
above chart include both new pro- 
grams and returning shows.) 

Since sponsor's fall network tv pro- 
gram schedule preview starts at 7:30, 
several earh Sundaj evening programs 
are not shown: ) ou Asked For It, 
ABC TV, 7-7:30 p.m.: The 20th Cen- 
tury, CBS TV, 6:30-7 p.m. (gross cost: 
$45,000) : and Lassie. CBS t\ . 7-7 :3fl 
p.m. Also the Monda\ through Friday 
news shows at 7:15-7:30 p.m. on all 
three networks are not shown. 

At presstime: It looks like Wire 
Service will again show up on the 
ABC TV schedule. R. J. Reynolds will 
sponsor a new half-hour version of the 
show on Monda) night. Time is not 
set as \et and perhaps Bold Journey 
and Voice of Firestone, the 8:30 and 
9 p.m. shows may be juggled. On 
CBS TV a good possibility for the 
8:30 spot Saturday night is the British- 
made film Dick & the Duchess with 
Mogen David Wine picking up half 
the tab. ^ 



in 



SPONSOR 



1 jlne 1957 



CAMPBELL'S NEW ADVERTISING 

TEAM TWO YEARS LATER 

Product manager system has proved it*«li in t\>o years, decentralizing 

multi-million media decisions, yet coordinating at marketing \.|>. leve 



M 



lodem advertising management 
techniques are enjoying a rare triumph 
.\i iht- ( lampbell Soup < .<<■ in ( iamden, 
Y J., where a Bemi-baronial nineteenth 
ccntun atmosphere had reigned until 

;l few -holt \ i\ll» ago. 

The Spartan, stripped down, crowded 
offices of Campbell's headquarters are 
witnessing a marketing and advertising 
revolution that austere founder-presi- 
drill Dr. Jnlin T. Dorrance l>i>tli anti< i- 
pated and abhorred. The part he 
anticipated as far back as 1904 was 
the company's need f< >r continuous 



and lavish consume) advertising, the 
aspects thai might have disturbed his 
somewhat paternal approach i" In- 
business empire is the remarkable dele- 
gation ol responsibilities thai has gone 
hand in hand with Campbell's market- 
ing revolution. 

The policies that have given Camp- 
bell Soup Co. some four-fifths "I ih<- 
I . S. — < « * 1 1 » market have always been 
long on hard-hitting, >li< k consumer 
advertising, ["here's been little change 
in the firm's successful advertising 
loi inula, be ii \ ia netwoi k i\ i Lassie 



and On Trial), its spot radio-h 
acti\ ii\ . <>r pt ini campaigns. 

Hie executive-shaking revolution a< • 
tuall) has occurred in the ways market- 
ing and .k^ ei i ising de< isions an 
made, administered and i oordinated 
with Campbell's four advertising agen- 
cies, I BBDt >. Leo Burnett, Needham, 
Louis ^ Broi b) and I atham-l .t\n\. • 

I Issentiallj . the change « an be 
summed up as a shift from highl) 
i ent i alized advei tising management 
under one man reporting i" the presi- 
dent i" a decentralized, product-man- 



Marketing v.p. John McGlinn (seated) plan- doll offei with Henrj Stevens (1.) marketing mgi ol "heat" soups, liill Hackenberg, prom 





Tv Commercials for lieat-prore— ed -< > 1 1 p- are planned by ( 1. to r. 
standing) W. P. MacFarland. product ad mgr. ; J. Damon, ass't a e, 
BBDO; II. Brown, i\ acct. superv., BBDO: II. L. Stevens, marketing 



mgr. of soups; (1. to r. seated) Jean Rindlaub, creative v. p.. BBDO, 
McD. Gillespie, acct. v. p.. acct. superv.. BBDO: Marge Fowler, tv 
comm'l superv.. BBDO. Plans are reviewed by marketing \.p. MeGlinn 



ager system, coordinated by marketing 
v.p. John MeGlinn. 

I lie stages in a campaign, for ex- 
ample the decision to buy a particular 
network tv property, are as clear-cut 
as those in the preparation of Camp- 
bell s well-known chicken noodle soup. 
In line with Dr. John Dorrances stoic 
concept of human nature, the creativ- 
ity of an idea, no matter how brilliant, 
never takes precedence over the routine 
prescribed for developing it. 

By the time an advertising decision, 
be it media or copy or an over-all new 
strategy, emerges through the com- 
bined Campbell-agency effort, it has 
been thoroughly peeled, scraped, 
cleaned and tested, and the likelihood 
of a booboo is fractionalized. to say 
the least. 

Does this mean that the Campbell 
Soup system of developing a market- 
ing-advertising strategy i> so foolproof 
that it takes the gamble out of tv? 

Not entirely. You can feed, breed 
and pluck chickens in a prescribed 
way, but no matter what kind of 
formula you develop for a top-rated 
network tv vehicle, vou can't predict 
the ways and wax wardness of the U. S. 
viewing public. Campbell Soup found 
this out with Sound Stage, for instance, 
which had something less than a spec- 



tacular run on NBC TV some three 
years ago. On the other hand. Lassie 
on CBS TV has pulled consistently 
good ratings, and, more important to 
Campbell's pragmatic marketing group, 
good sales results, judging from num- 
erous inside research studies. 

"If the networks went wrong last 
fall season and their experts did on 
the tv taste of the public, it's reason- 
able to suppose that hiring one man 
as a tv expert within the company 
wouldn't be the solution." John 
MeGlinn told SPONSOR. 

A tall, handsome man in his early 
forties, MeGlinn originally started with 
Campbell as a retail salesman in Phila- 
delphia in 1934. He rose through the 
sales and product marketing ranks to 
become v.p. in charge of marketing in 
March 1956. succeeding Clarence E. 
Eldridge. previously of General Foods. 

ARTICLE IN BRIEF 

Campbell's "marketing revolution," 
now time-tested after two years, de- 
centralized advertising management, 
except on network tv level. Coordi- 
nator-in-chief is the marketing v.p. to 
whom sales and admen report. But 
ad director coordinates advertising. 



The purpose of the new organization 
of advertising and marketing manage- 
ment is double-edged: ( 1 1 The growth 
of the company has been so phenome- 
nal in terms of dollar sales ( some 
$140 million in 1946 to nearly S430 
million in 1956) and in complexity 
I from 34 products in 1947 to more 
than 80 today I . that Campbell had to 
outgrow its feudal origins in advertis- 
ing as well as all other operations in 
order to remain healthy. 

(2) The complexity and high-cost of 
media and the growth of Campbell's 
advertising budget I today estimated at 
being in excess of ?20 million I dic- 
tated a more scientific approach to 
advertising-decision making. 

"Our product-manager s\ stem, which 
is relatively unchanged since we began 
it in 1954. gives us checks and 
balances between advertising and sales 
strategy." MeGlinn told sponsor. "It 
also helps our people work efficiently 
with our agencies and profit the most 
from our agencies' services." 

From the time in 1954 when Camp- 
bell changed from a virtual house 
agency, Ward \\ heelock Co. in Phila- 
delphia, to its four-agency set-up. the 
firms tendencx to extract every ounce 
of juice from its agencies' services has 
become proverbial with Campbell. 



42 



SPONSOR 



1 jlne 1957 



I [ere then is ho* an ail media plan 
emerges from the austere bullpens "i 
Campbell's advertising department and 
how Campbell's advertising and mar- 
keting manpower meshes with agencj 
creative men i<> develop .1 campaign: 

► The marketing />/</». < *»i 1 01 this 
I asic document, several hundred pages 
thick, come all the ideas that will 
eventuall) represent Campbell Soup 
advertising on the ail oi in print. 

I ach of the four product groups 
(heat-processed -< >u | >-. frozen -< >u | >-. 
I ranco-American products and juices, 
.mil Frozen Swanson) develops its own 
marketing plan from a statement ol 
facts to a thorough analysis "I prob- 
lems ami recommended solutions. I he 
statement of lads include- everything 
from product history, t" production 
details and sales and advertising his- 
tory. (This part <>f tlic marketing plan, 
incidentally, will be kept intact starting 
tlii- year, except for annual updating, 
to avoid a continuous going over the 
same material year after year.) 

"\\ e're not the <>nl\ ones im olved 
in making up these marketing plan-. 
says McGlinn. " \i our agencies every- 
one from account supervisors, account 
executives to research people, media. 
cop) and everj component of agencj 
service imaginable contributes to this 
annual volume of our problems and 
objecth es.' 

► Budget recommendation. Basic- 
ally, n:one\ recommendations stem 
from within the Campbell marketing 
department. The individual product 
marketing manager responsible for his 
plan lias some concept about the 
amount ol monej he \\ill require to 
execute the idea- he and the agent 5 
have discu sed in a preliminary waj 
between August and January . 

f>\ January, he eets together with 




Network tv buys lik< I assie ai rdinated foi < impbell producl groups bj ad 

in;: directoi Res Budd. He 1 1- producl admen to find oul theii network l>u«l^< 1 -. ■ 

then works with ageni ies to find right program. Produi 1- then share the shon and b 



McGlinn, more or less informally, and 
tells him w hat sort ol budget he has in 
mind. McGlinn, knowing his total ap 
propi iation, can then guide the appro 
priation ol hi- four producl marketing 
managers. 

rhese in turn then inform llicii 

agencies on the range of their budgets, 

so that the sgencj presentation will nol 

be out of proportion with fiscal reality. 

► Presentations. Between 1 Maj 

and 1") \la\ each year, the four agen- 
- -end their top account people out 

to Camden on the 7:30 a.m. Philadel- 
phia express, and there, in ,1 confer- 



ence ion in filled with the pun 
aroma of soup rather than cigarette 
-moke, the agent ies make their pre- 
sentations to McGlinn, Rez Budd, 
director of advertising, Gordon Scow- 
( roft. directoi ol marketing dei elop- 
ment, the producl marketing man 
and the product ad manager com erned. 
Invariably, BBDO a- the agencj for 

the heat-processed f Is, which ai - 

count for the bulk of Campbell's sales 
and the major chunk of it- ad budget. 
kick- o|f the presentation. BBDO 
eralK has a lull da) "i more to state 
: t- 1 ts '.. It i- then I illowed 1>\ Need- 









VICE PRESIDENT 
SALES 



VICE PRESIDENT 
MARKETING 



VICE PRESIDENT 
MARKETING 
AND STAFF 



PRODUCT 

MARKETING 

MANAGER 

HEAT PROCESSED 

SOUPS 



PROOUCT 

MARKETING 

MANAGER 

PORK AND BEANS 

V-8.TOMATO JUICE 

SWANSON 

NEAT PROCESSED 

PRODUCTS 



PRODUCT 
MARKETING 
MANAGER 
FROZEN 
PRODUCTS 



PROOUCT 
MARKETING 
MANAGER 
FRANCO- 
AMERICAN 
PRODUCTS 



DIRECTOR OF 
ADVERTISING 



0IRECTOR 

MARKETING 

DEVELOPMENT 



DIRECTOR 
HOME 

f : s : y ■ -. 



MANAGER 
MARKET 
RESEARCH 



GENERAL 
PROMOTION 
MANAGER 



Campbell's new marketing set-up 

overhaul of it 
tising mai .rr>-d 

mpany's _ 
tion. I ■ • • : rodui t-" mark 

four ne3r-3 I 
mous groups under product marketing and 
producl admen. Campbell tia- split the mar- 
ket .in. I advi r: i-m_- funi tii - 
the work burden within the f - that 

ml f'«r an estimated $20 million hilling. 












SPONSOR 



1 JINK. L951 



r. 



CAMPBELL'S NEW TEAM roniinued . 



ham, Louis & Brorby, Leo Burnett 
and Tatham-Laird, who generally also 
get at least a day each. 

According to some agency spokes- 
men who profer anonymity, these pre- 
-i ntations can be "downright brutal. 
Between getting questions shot at you 
and changes 'suggested' to you. and 
not being able to smoke, you can go 
"lit of your mind." 

But once the presentation has been 
accepted, the chances are that there 
will be few, if any, major changes 
between that time and the earning out 
of the advertising plans. "Once you've 
passed that firing line, you're in good 
shape," one agencyman told sponsor. 
"That is. providing vour film commer- 
cials have a perfect sound track, the 
animation is smooth enough to run 
away with all the art awards, and 
above all, the product makes you want 
to eat soup even though \ ou break 
out in hives from it." 

Actually, the presentations in early 
May follow the first work on the 
marketing plan 1>\ some six months. 
Before these presentations are made, 
the Campbell product managers (mar- 
keting and advertising both I. McGlinn, 
Budd and Scowcroft have already re- 
viewed the agency's marketing plans 
in written form. 

"This w i itten marketing plan." Budd 
told sponsor, "Is actually the product 
of combined agency-Campbell effort. 
The product advertising and market- 
ing managers work constantly with the 
agency account men in pulling to- 
gether the facts and analyzing them 
prior to the final writing of this report. 
By the time the agencies make their 
presentations, we've tentatively ap- 
proved budget recommendations and 
other basics. During the presentation 
we want to review advertising ap- 
proaches, see tv story boards to evalu- 
ate the theme and see how it'll sell. 
We want to hear audition tapes or 
records for radio commercials." 

► Program choice. This part of the 
job is handled separately from the 
formal 1-15 May agenc\ presentations. 

" \n\ thing our agencies recommend, 
we look at," says McGlinn. "But since 
the availability of good programing 
doesn t coincide with our rigorous 
schedule, we screen shows year-'round. 
rather than on a time table." 

In other words, like anv other 
sophisticated air media advertiser to- 
da\. Campbell Soup keeps a continuous 
weather eye out for new and better 
properties as possible replacements for 



their existing shows when these either 
outlive their contract or their popu- 
larity . 

On the other hand, a basic all \ new- 
network tv bu\. involving adding a 
new time period, for instance, might 
come out of the marketing plan and 
the subsequent agencv presentations. 

Sometimes, three or four weeks can 
elapse after an agency presentation, 
before the plans recommended can be 
considered "final."' For this "finality," 
the agencv must make a formal pre- 
sentation not only before the same 
group that saw it previously, but also 
before Bev Murphy, the youthful (49- 
v ear-old I president of Campbell, under 
whom the firm put up a fraction of its 
stock for public ownership in 1955 
for the first time in its history. 

Since Murph) ha< been kept abreast 
all along hv McGlinn of the market- 
ing thinking and strategy as it de- 
veloped, the last presentation is the re- 
sult of joint effort. Perhaps nine times 
out of 10, Murphy tends to approve 
the entire plan. He's had ample chance 
to modify or influence it prior to the 
formal presentation through consulta- 
tions with McGlinn. 

Tv requires high-level decision 

VA hen it comes to screening a new 
tv show, which is not part of the 
formal Mav presentation, it's unlikelv 
that a final decision to buy would be 
made without Murphy's approval. The 
moneys involved in a major television 
decision have brought tv advertising 
decisions to a higher level than the 
less binding decisions in other media. 

► Coordinating tv buys. While the 
decision to buv is a joint effort involv- 
ing possibly Murphy, but always 
McGlinn. Budd, Scowcroft and one or 
several groups of product executives, 
the coordination of a tv buv is pretty 
much the province of Rex Budd. as the 
corporate advertising director and Jim 
Shenfield. director product marketing. 

"The advertising department oper- 
ates in a staff capacity as consultants." 
says Budd. "We have over-all respon- 
sibility for anv advertising that cuts 
across product lines, such as the cur- 
rent qualit\ campaign on ingredients." 

No buying decision is made before 
Budd pools the product managers to 
find out ill whether thev feel need 
for nighttime network tv: (2) whether 
they like the choice of time and pro- 
graining: (3 1 whether and how much 
thev can contribute to the cost. 



If Budd's department found out 
from such a survey that, for example, 
frozen foods could put up SI million, 
Franco-American, $750,000 for a 
nighttime tv effort, then Budd would 
go to work to find a show to co- 
sponsor. 

► Agency relations. Says Budd: 
"We feel that the multiple-agency set- 
up parallels our own decentralization. 
Back in 1947 we were marketing 34 
products, now it's over 80. That's just 
another indication of our need for de- 
centralization. Each product group has 
its own agency, and we believe this 
prevents our getting 'the 5:15 treat- 
ment. In a way. the agencies compete 
with each other to render the best 
possible service to the segment of our 
business they've got as clients.' 

"We feel four agencies are just right 
for our size," Budd told sponsor. "If 
we split our billing too much, we'd 
dilute it and get less service." 

After its 39-year association with 
Ward Wheelock Co.. Campbell picked 
BBDO for the heat-processed soups in 
1954. Leo Burnett handles Franco- 
American products and tomato juice. 
"We felt, with the acquisition of Swan- 
son 1 1955 I that we should have Tat- 
ham-Laird stay on some frozen foods." 
Needham, Louis & Brorby handles pork 
and beans and V-8. 

\\ bile Campbell Soup uses every 
service its agencies offer (from pro- 
motion to marketing to research) to 
the fullest, the company does dupli- 
cate some of these services purposely. 
For instance, there's a media super- 
visor under Rex Budd. who mainly 
checks on the spot schedules the agen- 
cies buv for the various products, 
sees media reps to keep up to date 
on new market and media trends. 

Network salesmen tend to see Budd 
or the product men. Whereas on a 
problem of clearing more stations for 
a particular network tv show, the nego- 
tiations might involve McGlinn and a 
network v. p. 

"We never refer the reps to our 
agencies without seeing them. Our 
door's always open." says Budd. "Of 
course, we want them to see the 
agencv, but we also feel that we have 
to be well-rounded ourselves. The 
rep can keep us informed on what 
the market is on tv time. \\ e like to 
know what the co-sponsorship trends 
are. We want to be informed on pro- 
graming news, time trends. This helps 
us make wiser buvin« decisions." ^ 



II 



SPONSOR 



1 JUNE 195' 



I 










The relaxed 
sell . . . 

This fellow's no dummy. He can afford 

to relax because he has seasoned professionals 
working for him — people like Martha Wright, 
Jim McKay, John Henry Faulk. Galen 
Drake, Lanny Ross, Jim Lowe and Jack Sterling. 
Their easy-going, confident approach brings 
them and their products right to the heart of the 
family circle . . . And it's a fact that more 
different families are listening to WCBS Radio 
than to any other station in the New York area.* 

This vast audience not only listens but 
trusts the WCBS pros . . . and buys what they 
have to sell. So pull up a desk and lie down. 
Just call Buck Hurst at WCBS Radio 
or CBS Radio Spot Sales at PLaza 1-2345. 



New I 



™WCBS RADIO 




' I' A \ 



NETWORK RADIO'S CURRENT CLIENTS 



Compilation of program time 
bought by advertisers and brands 
is shown below by network 



I he first in a series of current network radio client lists appears be- 
low as a supplement to last issue's Radio Basics. Henceforth, an up-to- 
date roster will appear with ever) Radio Basics section. The list shows 
program time bought per week. In the case of NBC. commercials shorter 
than a minute are listed separately. Each minute commercial purchased 
on NBC is arbitrarily credited as five minutes of program time. Except 
for CBS. where the period covered is the week ending 25 May, all 
data cover clients and brands on air during the week beginning 25 May 






ABC 



Admiral: appliances; Breakfast Club: Ml': 25 min. 

Allstate Insurance: auto insurance; Mel Allen: M-F: 50 min. 

American Bird Food: bird food; Breakfast Club; M; 5 min. 

AFL-CIO: institutional; Ed. P. Morgan; M-F; 75 min.; /. W. Van- 

dercook; M-F; 25 min. 

Amino Products: Ac'cent; Breakfast Club; W; 5 min. 

Asco Electronics: Flea Guard, Magic Mite Ball; Breakfast Club: 

Tu.Th: 10 min. 

Assemblies of God: religious; Revivaltime ; Su; 30 min. 

Atlantic Sales: French's bird food products; My True Story; W,F & 

Tu,Th; alt. wks. 

Ball Bros.: home canning prod.; Breakfast Club; Tu-F; 20 min. 

Bankers Life & Casualty: White Cross Hospital Plan: Paul Harvey; 

Su; 15 min. 

Beech Nut: Beech-Nut gum; Breakfast Club; Tu,W,F; 15 min. 

Bridgeport Brass: various insecticides; When A Girl Marries; Tu-F; 
20 min. 

Bristol-Myers: Bufferin; Breakfast Club: M,W,F; 15 min.; Sal 

Hepatica: Breakfast Club; M.W.F; 15 min. 

Campana Sales: Ayds, Italian Balm; Breakfast Club; M; 5 min. 

Corling Brewing: Red Cap Ale: Martin Block Show: F,Sa; 100 min. 

Dixie Cup: paper cups & plates: Breakfast Club; W; 5 min. 

Dow Chemical: agricultural prod.: Red Foley Shoiv; Sa: 30 min. 

Drackett: Windex. Drano; Breakfast Club; W.Th.F; 15 min. 

Dromedary: cake mixes; My True Story: Tii.Th; 10 min.; When A 

Girl Marries: W.F: 10 min.; Whispering Streets; Th; 5 min. 

Duffy-Mott: Sunsweet prune juice; Breakfast Club: Tu.Th; 10 min. 

Ex-Lax: Ex-Lax, Jests; My True Story; M.W.F; 15 min. 

Firestone: tires, velon. others; Voice of Firestone; M; 30 min. 

Food Specialties: Appian Way pizza pie; Breakfast Club; Tu; 5 min. 

Foster-Milburn: Doan's pills: My True Story; Th; 15 min.; Whisper- 
ing Streets; Tu ; 5 min. 

General Foods: Calumet; Breakfast Club; Tu; 5 min.; Jell-O: 

Brail, last Club; M.W.F; 15 min.; My True Story; W.F; 10 min.: 

When a Girl Marries: Tu.Th; 10 min.: Whistiering Streets: W.F; 

10 min.: Kool-Aid: Breakfast Club; M-F; 25 min.; La France: 

Ureal, lust Club; _M.Tu.Tli: 15 min.; Post Cereals; Breakfast Club: 

M-F; 25 min. 

Gospel Broadcasting Assn.: religious: Old Fashioned Recital Hour: 

Su: 60 min. 

Billy Graham: religion*: Hour of Decision: Su: 30 min. 

Highland Church of Christ: religious: Herald of Truth; Su: 30 min. 

Charles E. Hires Co.: Hires Root Beer; Weekday Newscasts: M-F; 

100 min. 

La Choy: Chinese foods; Breakfast Club: M.W: 10 min. 

Midas Muffler: auto mufflers; Weekday Newscasts; M-F; 25 min. 

Milner Products: Perma Starch. Pine-Sol; Breakfast Club: M: 5 min. 

Mishawaha Rubber & Woolen Mfg.: casual shoes; Breakfast Club; 

Tu.Th; 10 min. 

National Brands, div. of Sterling Drug: Dr. Caldwell's; Sunshine 

Boys: M-F: 25 min. 

Norwich-Pharmocal: Pepto-Bismol; Weekend Newscasts: Sa.Su; 90 

min. 

NOTE: Data on time purchased refers to weekly brand or advertiser total I 
program, Time bought for particular brands is shown white possible, In cases 
where groups i I precede a show or group of shows, it was not possible to 

pinpoint which brands were advertised on each show or on which days of the week 



Oral Roberts Evangelistic Assn.: religious; Oral Roberts' Broad- 
i a sis : Su : 30 min. 

Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis: institutional; Business & Finan- 
cial Hour: .M.W.F: 15 min. 

Radio Bible Class: religion-: Radio Bible Class; Su; 60 min. 
Renuzit Home Products: cleaning fluid-, air sprays, etc.; Jack Paar 
Show; Th: 5 min. 

R. J. Reynolds: Camel: Weekday Newscasts: M-F: 100 min.: Week- 
end Newscasts; Sa.Su; 90 min. 

Sandura Company: floor covering; Breakfast Club; Th; 5 min. 
Sterling Drug Company: Phillips Tooth Paste; My True Story; 
Tu.Th; 10 min.; Ant Prufe & Roach Prufe; My True Story; Tu.Th; 
10 min. 

Voice of Prophecy: institutional; Voice of Prophecy; Su; 30 min. 
Dr. Thomas Wyatt: institutional: Wings of Healing: >u; 30 min. 



CBS 



American Home Foods: Wendy Warren; W,Th; 10 min. 

Amino Products: Arthur Godfrey; W & Th, alt. wks.; 15 min. 

Bristol Myers: Arthur Godfrey; M.W: 60 min. 

Campana Sales: Robert Q. Lewis: Sa; 5 min. 

Chun King Sales: Arthur Godfrey: W & F, alt. wks.; 15 min. 

Clairol: Galen Drake: Sa; 5 min. 

Colgate-Palmolive: Our Gal Sunday; M-F; 37 r o min.; Backstage 

Wife; M-F; 37 1 - min.: Strike It Rich: M-F: 37% min.; 2nd Mrs. 

Burton; M-F; 37% min. 

Cowles Magazines: Jack Benny: Su. alt. wks.; 3 : S min. 

Curtis Circulation: Arthur Godfrey; Tu: 15 min. 

Dixie Cup: Robert Q. Lewis: Sa: 5 min. 

Florida Land & Homes Bureau: Galen Drake: Sa; 5 min. 

General Foods: Arthur Godfrey; Th, every 4th F, 18% min.; Wendy 

Warren; Th : 5 min.: World News Roundup: Su: 5 min.: Gunsmoke; 

Su; 5 min.; Our Miss Brooks: Su: 5 min.: Amos V Andy Music 

Hall: M-F; 25 min.; Galen Drake: Sa: 5 min.: Robert Q. Lewis: Sa; 

5 min.; Gunsmoke; Sa: 5 min. 

General Motors: Allan Jackson — News: Sa; 20 min.; Robert Trout — 

News; Su, M-F: 40 min.: Frigidaire; Robert 0. Lewis: Sa; 5 min.: 

Galen Drake: Sa: 5 min.: 2nd Mrs. Burton: M: 7V. min.: Dr. 

Malone; Tu; 7% min.: Our Gal Sunday: W; 7% min.: Ma Perkins: 

Th; 7'j min.: Delco: Lowell Thomas: M-F; 75 min.: Pontiac: Galen 

Drake; Sa; 5 min.; Robert Q. Lewis: Sa; 5 min.; Amos V Andy 

Music Half: Sa: 5 min.: Gunsmoke: Sa; 5 min.: Sat. Night Country 

Style; Sa: 5 min.: Susi>ense; Su: 5 min.; Johnny Dollar: Su: 5 

min: FBI In Peace <?• War: Su : 5 min.: Gunsmoke: Su: 5 min.: 

Mitch Miller: Su; 5 min.: Amos V Andy Music Hall: M-F: 25 min. 

Harti Mountain Products: Arthur Godfrey; Th & F. alt. wks.: IS 

min. 

Hearst Publications: Ma Perkins: M: 7% min.: Dr. Malone: M: 

7V 2 min.: Helen Trent: Tu; 7% min.: Our Gal Sunday : M: 7% min. 

Hudson Vitamin Products: Galen Drake: Sa: 5 min.: Robert Q. 

Lewis; Sa : 5 min. 

Kellogg: Arthur Godfrey: Tu.Th: 30 min. 

Leeds Chemical Products: JVora Drake: M.W.F: 22 1 -j min.: Road of 

Life: Tu.Th: 15 min. 

the brands were advertised. Except for General Motors, brands information was not 
available from ens 

In NBC li-t. i"t mean, commercials are rotated on different clays of the week under 
the web's run "i schedule plan. 






Lever Bio;.: 1/'/ Perkins, M I .ih. »k- ; 17' j linn.. Romanci 

Helen Trent, M I . ;.'_■ .; Ma Perkins M Fall. »k- ; l;: : , nun.. 

Young Dr. Malont M I . 17V4 nun.. House Part) \l I . I7V4 min. 
Lewis Howe: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; i nun. 

P. Lonllard: World Tonight', ^ I . IS nun.; hulii tment v n . . nun.; 

Miii h Miller; Su; > i .; Sports Resume', Sa; > min.; Sports R 

me SlIJ S nun.; >«/. Vife ' nunli\ Style; Sa; > mm.; ffflOJ '»' f rj </ v 

I/// %/ > //<;//. Th.F; lo min.; Johnny Dollar ; Su; 5 min.; Oui 1//%% 
Brooks; Su; 5 min.; Robert Q Lewis; Id. I ■': lo nun.: Suspense; 
Sn; 5 min.; I"i<>\ V tndy; Sa; > min. 
Longines-Wittnauer: Longines Symphonette; Su; 10 min. 
Milncr Products: Robert Q, Lewis; Sa; > min. 

Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Assn.: Irthur Godfrey . I n 8 

ever} '•'' '" : '" : ' """■ 

North American Philips: Herman Hickman-Sports; M.W.I ; I") mill. 

Norwich Pharmacol: trthui Godfrey; In; ever) llli I' ; Ifl-'i min. 

Pharmacraft: House Party; M. I'll. I •': 10 min. 

Pillsbury: Irthur Godfrey; Til. I'll; 10 nun. 

Reader's Digest: Irthur Godfrey; \\ : 15 min. 
Rcnuzit Home Products: House Party; W; 7% min. 
R. J. Reynolds: Herman Hickman Sports; In. I h,Sa; l"> tnin. 
Salada Tea: Backstage Wife; M,Th; 15 min.; Romance of Helen 
Trent; \\ : 7 ' ■_• min.; Sora Drake; Tu.F: 15 min. 
Scott Paper: Irihm Godfrey; I'll. I- 8 ever) 1th F; 18 :! , min.; Back- 
stage Wife; I ; ~'j min.; Young Dr. M alone; Th.F: I") min.; Sora 
Drake; Tu.Th; I") min.; Mn Perkins; Tu 8 W .ilt. «k-: 7 ' _■ min.; 
2nd Mrs. Burton; Th.F; r> min. 

Sherwin-Williams: irthur Godfrey; W, everj Ith F; 18*4 min. 
Simoniz: irthur Godfrey; \\ : 15 min; House Party, \\ : 15 min.: G. 
Herman Sews; Tli.F: lo min.; E. Sevareid Sews; Th,F; lo min.; 
Veias; Sa; I") min.; Spur is \ ru s . Sa; 10 min. 

Slenderella: Slenderella Slum: >.i ; 10 min. 

A. E. Staley Mfg.: House Party; Tu; r> min.; irthur Godfrey; F; 

1") min. 

Standard Brands: House Party; M; l"> min.; Arthur Godfrey; M. 8 

ever) lih F; ! 7 ' -_• min. 

Swift: Huns, ■ Party; F; 1"> min. 

Toni: Robert Q. I. cms: Sa; 5 min. 

Vernell's Buttermints: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min. 

VVeco Products: Irthur Godfrey; M: 15 min. 

F. W. Woolworth: Woolworth Hour: Su; 60 min. 

Wm. Wrigley, Jr.: Howard Miller Show: M-F: 75 min.: /'<// Buttram 

Show; M-F; 75 min. 



BS 



Amana Products: refrigerators, air conditioners; True Detective Mys- 
teries; M: 5 min.: Counter-Spy; F; 5 min. 

Americon Home Products: \na< in. Bisadol, lero-Shave, Infra-Rub. 
Kolynos, Primadne, Preparation II. Free-Zone, Petro-Cylium; Steve 
McCormick \ <•;<*. M-F; _'") min.: Gabriel Heater Sews; Tu; 5 
min. 

American Molasses: Grandma's Molasses: Gayelord Hauser; Tu.Th; 
10 min. 

Billy Graham Evangelical Assn.: religious; Billy Graham; So 
min. 

Carter Products: Little Liver Pills; Gabriel Heater \cus: Tu; 
."> mill. 

Christian Reformed Church: religious; Back to God; Su; 30 min. 
Coca-Cola: Coca-Cola; Eddie Fisher: Tu.Th; 30 min. 
Dawn Bible Institute: religious; Frank and Finest: Su: 15 min. 
Drug Products: \-liim: Treasury Agent; Tu: 5 min.; Secrets of 
Scotland )anf: Th; 5 min. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist: religions; Hon Christian Science 
Heals: Su: 15 min. 

General Tire & Rubber: General tires; General Sports Time: Su-F; 
35 min. 

Kraft: Ml Purpose oil, mustard, Kraft dinner, Miracle Whip, Italian 
Dressing, cheese spreads, Parkay; Frank Singiser Sews, M-Sa; 30 
min.: Holland Engle Sews; M-Sa; 30 min.; Fes Higbie Sews; 
M-Sa; 30 min.: Sam Hayes Sews; M-Sa; 30 min.; Cedru Fost 
Sews; M-Sa; 30 min.; True Detective Mysteries; M: 5 min.; Treas- 
ury Agent; Tu: 5 min.: Gang Busters: \Y: 5 min.; s 
land ) ard : Th : ."> min.: Counter-Spy; F: 5 min. 
Lever Brothers: Pepsodent; Charles Warren \eus. M-Sa; 10 min.: 
Henr\ Gladstone- Sews; M-Sa: 30 min. 

P. Lorillard: Kent; True Detective Mysteries; M: 5 min.: Treasury 
Agent: Tu: o min.: Gang Rasters: \\ : 5 min.: Secrets of Scotland 
Yard: Th: .S min.: Counter-Spy; F; 5 min. 



Lutheran Laymen's League: religious; Lutheran Houi S min. 

Lyon Van: mai in| haulii ' ' 1 ■mi. 

Manion Forum of Opinion ll-an Clarence M anion 

I i nun. 

Miles Laboratories: Nervine, Oni \ Day, I ibeini Millie < 

M-F; '■ "in, //.,. //., . „ | M„rtiu Starr M I 25 nun : 

//.;//. Hennessy Sen M \\ l 15 min fohn Scott Sett Ml 
10 min.; Ed Pettitt Sews Sa; 15 min.; Wonders of the World; 

Ml 25 - .; Queen Fo» / /<<;. Ml 25 nun.; /.»/. I/;/; V 

M I . .' ■ mm. 

Quaker State Oil Refining: Q . (,„ni, of the Day 5| 

60 nun.. Jporta Flashes with Frankie I 10 min. 

Radio Bible Class: religious; Ratio ////./. < lass. Su; ;n min. 

R. J. Reynolds: < amel; Camel Scoreboard Su-Sfl 15 min v7in 

-inn: II ins/on Scoreboard; Su - min. 

Slcep-Ezc: sleep tablet; 7Yu< /'•'■ • ■ W. '.'/■ \l . n ■„, I 

/.'i; rterj ft . i mm ' Spj l , mm. 

Sterling Drug: Fletcher's Castoria; Qm en Foi t Day Ml. 25 min 

Voice of Prophecy: religious; Void of Prophecy Su; 10 min. 

Wings of Healing: religious; Wings of Healing; Su; 60 min. 

Word of Life Fellowship: religion! " Ord of Lift IF min. 



NBC 



institutional; \ut'l. Farm & Home Hour: - 



M; 10 



min.. _'l 

M-F; 215 min.. 



Allis-Cholmcrs 

min. 

American Motors: Rambler; Monitor, SaJSu; 55 min. 

American Oil: Lmoco products; Monitor Sa,Su; 50 min. 

Bell Telephone: Monitor. Su; 10 min.; Telephone Hour 

min.; Telephone Preview; M; 5 min. 

Billy Graham Evangelistic Assn.: religion; Hour of Decision 

30 min. 

Bristol-Myers: Bufferin; Hourly Sews; M-F; 105 

Brown & Williamson: Kools, Viceroy; Hourly \iu> 

12 30-sec 

Colgon: Calgon; Bandstand: \\ .1 h : III nun. 

Calif. Packing: canned fruit; Hourly Sews; M-F; 110 min., 2] 10 
sec. 

Carter Products: Vrrid, 10 min.; Little I iwi Pills, 60 miii.: Band- 
stand; M-F; 20 min.; True Confessions; rot., 5 min.; Human In My 
House: rot., 5 min.; Hilltop House, rot, 5 min.; Pepper Young's 
Family; rot., 5 min.; Veiw o/ 7/fte If «rW: Tu.W.Th: 15 min.; Moni- 
tor . Sa,Sn : .!■"> min. 

DcSoto: DeSoto cars; You Bet Your File: Sa; 10 min. 
Evangelistic Foundation: religion; Bible Study Hour; Su; 30 min. 
Evinrudc Motors: outboards; Monitor; F,Sa25u; 2"> min. 
Ex-Lax: Ex-Lax; Monitor: Sa,Su; | 10-aec, 5 6-sec; Bandstand; 
Tu.Th: 2 6-sec; Woman In Ifj ffoiue; M.'lh.F: 10 mm.. 1 II 
> Star Matinee: T,,.Th: 2 30-sec.; Pepper Young's Family; M-W; 5 
mm.. 2 30-sec; One I/ah's Family: Th: ."> min.: /'■ • fre Funny; 
W : 5 min.: Great GUderslevee; Tu: 5 min. 

General Foods: (nstanl Postum; Bandstand: M-F; 25 min.: /'■ 
Young's Family; M-F; 2.i min. 

Gillette: Gillette p>r...l-.. Paper-Mate, Toni prod.; Boxing Bouts; F; 
l!~> min. 

Ins. Co. of No. America: insurance; Monitor: Su; 20 min. 
Knapp-Monarch: picnii supplies; Monitor: SaJSu; 1 

P. Lorillard: Kent; Monitor: Ni.-ii: 50 min., 9 30 . 

Lutheran Laymen's League: religion; Lutheran Hon- - min. 

Midas: car mufflers; Monitor: Su; 5 min. 

Morton Salt: -.ilt: ilex Dreier— Sews - nin. 

Mutual of Omaha: insurance; On (At Lint Will Cons 

15 min. 

North American Van Lines: moving service; Monii 5a,Su; 20 

min. 

Quaker Oats: Quake] Monitor: Sa; 

M,W; .' 10-sei ; Woman In 1A House; Tu.Tli.F: I '.< - 

Man's Family ; M.W.Th.F: 4 ' 

Quaker State Oil; motor oil; Monito- -